Criminal Defense Attorney inCarlisle, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
Carlisle, SC

Getting charged with a crime in Carlisle can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in Carlisle, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in Carlisle, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

Criminal Defense Attorney Carlisle, SC

Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for Carlisle criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the Carlisle Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in Carlisle
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in Carlisle can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Law Firm Carlisle, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in Carlisle, SC

DUI penalties in Carlisle can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Carlisle, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in Carlisle, SC

The consequences of a DUI in Carlisle depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in Carlisle, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

Criminal Defense Attorney Carlisle, SC

First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Law Firm Carlisle, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in Carlisle may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Carlisle, SC

Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in Carlisle, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in Carlisle can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in Carlisle can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in Carlisle, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common Carlisle
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in Carlisle, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our Carlisle defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

Criminal Defense Attorney Carlisle, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in Carlisle.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
Carlisle, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in Carlisle can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in Carlisle, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Law Firm Carlisle, SC
 Criminal Defense Lawyer Carlisle, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in Carlisle. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in Carlisle include:

Criminal Defense Attorney Carlisle, SC
  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in Carlisle, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

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Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in Carlisle, SC

‘Carlisle Tour’ offers affordable start to competitive golf

It’s gone by many different names based off of the organizations who host them and the sponsors who attach their name to them, but most of the participants know it by one moniker.The Carlisle Tour.That’s the informal name for Aiken’s local junior golf tour, also known as the Aiken Chapter of the South Carolina Junior Golf Association’s Hootie and the Blowfish Summer Chapter Series.“It has gotten that name, and it stuck. I keep saying, no now, we’re the Aiken chapter of the South Caroli...

It’s gone by many different names based off of the organizations who host them and the sponsors who attach their name to them, but most of the participants know it by one moniker.

The Carlisle Tour.

That’s the informal name for Aiken’s local junior golf tour, also known as the Aiken Chapter of the South Carolina Junior Golf Association’s Hootie and the Blowfish Summer Chapter Series.

“It has gotten that name, and it stuck. I keep saying, no now, we’re the Aiken chapter of the South Carolina Junior Golf Association,” USC Aiken golf coach Michael Carlisle joked. “They’ve got Hootie and the Blowfish sponsoring it, but I guess it’s easier to just say the Carlisle Tour. I guess there’s worse things that could happen. ... Either that, or I’m just the one they’re stuck with running the thing, so they better get my name right if they want to play.”

Carlisle is the director of the tournament series, and he estimated his involvement has lasted for around 35 years. Needless to say, he knows better than anyone how being involved with this local tour can benefit a junior golfer.

“It’s what we refer to as kind of a grassroots start in competitive golf,” he explained. “Golf can be a very expensive game if you’re traveling to tournaments and paying entry fees and staying in hotels and things like that. Here, you can stay at home and travel to these tournaments and get some good, competitive experience.

“Even the better players, when they don’t have anything really good to travel to, they can stay here and play some local golf courses and play with their friends, guys they’ve played and grew up with all along. It is just a good grassroots start into competitive golf where you can get out there and find out if you like competitive golf, if you enjoy doing it, and maybe go on to bigger and better things from there.”

This year’s series has 13 summer dates and between five and eight around Christmas, and he credited the help of the area’s golf courses for making that happen despite the challenges caused by the changing school calendar. Still, they were able to squeeze in the schedule and accommodate everybody.

Per the SCJGA’s website, dues for the Aiken chapter are $150 for the 7-12 age group and $200 for the 13-18 group, and the contact number is (803) 641-3528.

The series has turned benefited players of all ability levels, and Carlisle has seen some good ones pass through - most notably pros like Kevin Kisner, Scott Brown and Charles Howell III.

“And then there’s just been a pile of kids who have gone on to college and played collegiately that have played in that, also. It’s turned out some good players, and it’s turned out a lot of good people who are still in the game.”

Some of those are second-generation players who are keeping it in the family while also reminding Carlisle just how long he’s been running the tour.

“It always amazes me, I’ll run across somebody who calls me up and says, ‘Hey, I’ve got an 8-year-old and I want to get him involved in competitive golf. I played in those tournaments when I was in their age,’” he said. “I’m thinking, good Lord, I’m getting the kids of former players who are playing now, so that kind of dates me a little bit also.”

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Meet the candidates: Carlisle Harrison (Dorchester County Council)

Carlisle Harrison is a retired USAF, MSC, Colonel with over 28 years of active duty service. He has served in leadership positions for multiple hospitals, clinics, and health care networks all over the country and, through his military service, the world. He has served on nonprofit boards and organizations across the spectrum of community engagement and healthcare access.He is the immediate past chairman and current finance committee member of the Fetter Health Care Network (FHCN) board, an organization dedicated to serving the insure...

Carlisle Harrison is a retired USAF, MSC, Colonel with over 28 years of active duty service. He has served in leadership positions for multiple hospitals, clinics, and health care networks all over the country and, through his military service, the world. He has served on nonprofit boards and organizations across the spectrum of community engagement and healthcare access.

He is the immediate past chairman and current finance committee member of the Fetter Health Care Network (FHCN) board, an organization dedicated to serving the insured, uninsured, and undeserved residents of Dorchester, Berkeley, and Charleston counties. Past Treasurer of Charleston Promise Neighborhood board and current finance committee member, an organization dedicated to providing and facilitating comprehensive programs and services that support children and strengthen families. Graduate of the University of Louisville with a BSC and MA from Central Michigan University. Senior Health Policy Fellowship, Office of the Surgeon General, Bolling AFB, DC. Carlisle and his wife Flora have two children and seven grandchildren and live in North Charleston.

Lori Hammond, aka Lori McCracken, aka Lori Blakely, 54, of Summerville, Christopher Conrad, 41, of Holly Hill, Catherine “Cassie” Needham, 38, of Manning, and Jontrell Wright, 37, of Orangeburg, were sentenced to federal prison after being convicted of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and wire fraud for submitting fraudulent Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan applications and misusing the funds.

Evidence presented during the sentencing hearings established Hammond submitted more than $11 million in fraudulent loan applications for PPP and COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster (EIDL) loans for her enrichment and the enrichment of her co-conspirators. The loan applications contained inflated employee and payroll funds, were often submitted on behalf of companies that did not exist or were inactive and included fake business addresses and fraudulent tax documents. More than $5.8 million in PPP and EIDL loans were paid to Hammond and her co-conspirators.

“While millions of South Carolinians were struggling during the pandemic, these defendants defrauded the systems meant to provide relief,” said Adair F. Boroughs, U.S. Attorney for the District of South Carolina. “We will continue to pursue bad actors such as these and hold them accountable for exploiting these resources for their own gain.”

Hammond personally received $3,162,038.50 in PPP and EIDL loan funds. She spent the money on personal expenses, including purchasing a home, luxury vehicles, a golf cart and plastic surgery. She was sentenced to 80 months imprisonment, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $2,722,932.50 in restitution, representing the remaining outstanding unpaid loan funds.

Conrad fraudulently received $898,300 in loans and spent the funds on unapproved personal expenses. He was sentenced to 12 months and one day incarceration, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $898,300 in restitution.

Needham fraudulently received $1,244,200 and used the funds for improper personal expenses, including purchasing property, a golf cart, a pool, home improvements and plastic surgery. She was sentenced to 21 months incarceration, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $1,244,200 in restitution.

Wright fraudulently received $561,700 in loan funds and spent the funds on personal expenses. He was sentenced to 15 months incarceration, followed by a three-year term of supervised release and ordered to pay $561,700 in restitution.

“These sentences reflect the severity of PPP loan fraud,” said Steve Jensen, special agent in charge of the FBI Columbia Field Office. “Such crimes challenge the integrity of relief programs designed for those who need assistance most. The FBI is committed to holding offenders accountable and safeguarding loan programs to ensure the public’s trust in our financial systems.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney Emily Limehouse prosecuted this case. The Hon. David C. Norton presided over the sentencing hearings in Charleston.

Opera at USC presents Carlisle Floyd’s 'Susannah' Nov. 1-3

School of Music alum returns to perform in beloved American operaIn the 65 years since its premiere, South Carolina-born composer Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah stands as one of the most beloved American operas. Floyd, dubbed “a master of creating mood in the orchestra” by The Los Angeles Times, is a South Carolina Hall of Fame inductee, 2004 National Medal of Arts awardee and recipient of the 2008 National Endowment for the Arts Opera Honoree for lifetime work. Opera theater student .&q...

School of Music alum returns to perform in beloved American opera

In the 65 years since its premiere, South Carolina-born composer Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah stands as one of the most beloved American operas. Floyd, dubbed “a master of creating mood in the orchestra” by The Los Angeles Times, is a South Carolina Hall of Fame inductee, 2004 National Medal of Arts awardee and recipient of the 2008 National Endowment for the Arts Opera Honoree for lifetime work.

Under the direction of Ellen Douglas Schlaefer, the School of Music presents Floyd’s Susannah at the university’s Drayton Hall Theatre Nov. 1-3.

Opera alumnus Daniel Gainey returns to the university to perform the role of Little Bat McClean, a troubled boy and admirer of title character Susannah.

“It is an honor for me to return to South Carolina professionally to help bring Mr. Floyd's music to life in Schlaefer's production,” Gainey says.

Schlaefer, director of opera studies at the University of South Carolina, gives graduate and undergraduate students the opportunity to learn from a comprehensive program covering every facet of opera production, both on stage and behind the scenes.

“Ellen's commitment to creating a working theater company for her students, by her students, instilled a great sense of ownership for my opportunities,” Gainey says. “I create my chances as an artist instead of waiting for someone to offer me one.”

Gainey came to UofSC on a full scholarship and he credits that opportunity for opening doors he never expected. Since he graduated in 2007, he has performed as a singer and instrumentalist and directed shows. Gainey is the pastoral musician for St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Asheville, North Carolina. He credits his success in part to opera at South Carolina.

“While I was at USC, I was amazed at how many resources and connections I made,” Gainey says. “I was in a leading role by my sophomore year. I was getting one-on-one time with coaches, professors and audiences. It was an amazing experience.”

The music of Susannah is characterized by Appalachian folk melodies and includes some Protestant hymns and traditional classical music. A prominent part of the opera is Susannah’s soaring aria in Act II, "The Trees on the Mountain," similar to Appalachian folk tunes, but is Floyd's own composition.

The libretto, also written by the composer, has as its basis the apocryphal story of Susannah and the Elders, updated to the recent past and relocated to a fictional rural community. The drama centers on the unjust ostracizing and abuse of Susannah by her community and the powerful leaders who are simultaneously repulsed and captivated by her beauty.

“The opera explores themes of hypocrisy, fear and the malleability of crowds, all of which are extremely relevant to our society today,” says Melissa Starkweather, a second-year master’s student in opera theater and one of two students performing the title role. “It is an exciting thing to be a part of a show which carries such a powerful message. Both the story and the music are absolutely gripping and will leave audiences with a new perspective on the power of fear.”

I hope this work can inspire the next generation of South Carolina operatic talent.

Daniel Gainey, opera alumnus

Senior choral music education and honors student Catherine Howland also plays Susannah.

“Discovering the slow, harrowing transformation and internal struggle that Susannah experiences has been a challenge, but it has also been captivating,” Howland says. “I have loved the opportunity to grow as a performer through this wonderful opera. Susannah warns us of the power of a community to do evil but encourages us to consider how we can instead do good in our own community.”

“People are ostracized and isolated every day, both for things they have done and things they haven’t,” says T.J. Turner, a master's in voice performance student who plays Sam, Susannah’s brother. “This show emphasizes the destruction and emotional turmoil it can cause for not only those who are accused, but also those who are doing the accusing, despite the reason. I think we can all identify with Susannah, but it’s important to take a step back and learn from what the other characters are doing to her and her brother, Sam, throughout this masterpiece.”

Despite its serious topic, Susannah was received well and hailed as an instant classic at its world premiere in Tallahassee, Florida, and later at the New York City Opera in 1956. The appeal of the opera has endured for more than six decades, a rare feat in operas composed in the 20th century. It attests to the composer’s uncommon ability to wed tuneful music with astute dramatic insights to create an opera of complex characters, emotional immediacy and thrilling narrative pace.

“South Carolina has given generously of its talents to the operatic world,” Gainey says. “Carlisle Floyd and Ellen Schlaefer are two such gifts. I hope this work can inspire the next generation of South Carolina operatic talent."

The opera, sung in English, will be performed at Drayton Hall Theatre, 1214 College St., at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 1 and 2 and at 3 p.m. Nov. 3. Tickets are $25 for adults; $20 for seniors, UofSC faculty and staff and military; $10 for students with ID. Tickets are available online through the USC Marketplace or at the door. Please note that online and phone sales end at 3 p.m. on opening day. After that you may purchase at the door one hour before showtime.

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Pollution leaks at aging textile plant threaten Broad River, Columbia drinking water

When the small plane he was riding in flew over a closed textile factory several months ago, Bill Stangler saw two slime-covered waste lagoons on the edge of the Broad River north of Columbia.The proximity of the factory’s lagoons to the river worried him. Stangler, the riverkeeper for the Broad, knew the basins were in an area where high levels of hazardous chemicals had been found in groundwater, sewer sludge and wastewater.He also knew the river and one of the state’s largest drinking water plants – 65 mile...

When the small plane he was riding in flew over a closed textile factory several months ago, Bill Stangler saw two slime-covered waste lagoons on the edge of the Broad River north of Columbia.

The proximity of the factory’s lagoons to the river worried him. Stangler, the riverkeeper for the Broad, knew the basins were in an area where high levels of hazardous chemicals had been found in groundwater, sewer sludge and wastewater.

He also knew the river and one of the state’s largest drinking water plants – 65 miles south in Columbia – have shown the same types of chemicals at levels above a proposed federal safe drinking water limit. The site of the lagoons reinforced his concerns that leaks from the plant were perilously close to the river and threatening Columbia’s canal drinking water.

The questions now are whether chemicals from Carlisle Finishing caused the contamination downriver and what can be done to reduce the threat of the toxic pollutants, known as per and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, in Columbia.

“That site is a potential source of PFAS for the Broad River and certainly PFAS that could be found downstream in Columbia’s drinking water,’’ Stangler said. “This is a potential ticking time bomb of pollution that sits less than 100 feet from the Broad River.’’

At Carlisle Finishing, forever chemical pollution is up to 7,200 times higher in groundwater than the proposed federal standard of four parts per trillion, state data show. Tests show sludge from waste basins has forever chemical levels up to 80 times higher than the proposed federal limit.

Levels recorded in the river and Columbia’s drinking water plant are substantially lower, but they still exceed the proposed limit for the two most common types of PFAS.

Clint Shealy, Columbia’s assistant city manager over utilities, said he wants to know whether the city or state can stop future threats and any existing leaks that are contaminating the river at the Carlisle plant.

Not only does Columbia want to limit forever chemicals in drinking water for safety reasons, but stopping them could save the city hundreds of millions of dollars. Columbia faces the prospect of spending more than $150 million for a filtering system to comply with the federal drinking water limit for PFAS if it can’t keep the pollutants out of its water, Shealy has said.

Because PFAS levels aren’t substantially above the proposed limit at the canal plant — they are less than 10 parts per trillion — any reduction in the chemicals in the Broad River could help bring the city into compliance without costly upgrades to its water system, Shealy said.

“The first logical step is to stop putting this stuff in the environment,’’ Shealy said. “Then, let’s see if our PFAS levels start decreasing. It might bring you below that limit and save customers a whole lot of money.’’

PFAS, a class of thousands of compounds, is commonly called forever chemicals because the materials do not break down easily in the environment. Used since the 1940s, the chemicals were vital ingredients in waterproof clothing, stain resistant carpet and firefighting foam.

But they have increasingly been found to be toxic. Exposure has been linked to kidney, testicular and breast cancer, ulcerative colitis and thyroid problems. Forever chemicals also can weaken a person’s immune system and cause developmental delays in children. PFAS manufacturers have been accused of hiding the dangers for decades.

In this case, it’s possible that even if forever chemical pollution can be reduced and cleaned up at Carlisle Finishing, the damage may have been done years ago.

Stangler said it would not be surprising if Carlisle Finishing released the chemicals for years, long before the public knew about the dangers. The company ran a treatment plant for wastewater it generated at the textile factory, but wastewater systems are not required to filter out forever chemicals before releasing wastewater into a river. Only certain pollutants are required to be treated.

For now, state regulators say they are trying to learn more about the problem at Carlisle. The 68-year-old textile plant, which closed about three years ago, is under scrutiny by the state Department of Health and Environmental Control for the pollution found on the sprawling site between Columbia and Spartanburg.

In April, DHEC sent factory representatives a letter calling the environmental problems at Carlisle Finishing “an urgent legal matter.’’ The letter said Elevate Textiles, a one-time owner, is potentially liable to clean up the mess at the Carlisle plant. In addition to forever chemicals in groundwater, DHEC also has found the presence of volatile organic compounds, the agency said. These types of materials include solvents and chlorination byproducts.

“Because the site poses a hazard to human health and the environment, the department recommends that you give this matter your immediate attention,’’ the April letter from DHEC’s Gary Stewart to Elevate Textiles said.

Consultants have submitted a cleanup plan that appears promising, but DHEC needs to push for a resolution as soon as possible to stop the threat, said Stangler and Carl Brzorad, an attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center.

The plan says filter systems will be installed to remove PFAS from wastewater before it is released to the Broad River.

Sludge from waste basins also will be disposed of in a lined landfill on the property, according to the April 2023 plan. Sludge from Carlisle Finishing contained forever chemicals, although DHEC did not provide the levels.

In the past, the Carlisle plant distributed sludge to area farmers for use as fertilizer. All told, DHEC had given approval to spread the plant’s waste on more than 80 farm fields that included parts of small communities like Buffalo, Whitmire and Carlisle, state records show.

Tests last year found some wells near sludge fields contained levels of PFAS that would exceed the proposed federal drinking water standard, agency records show. One of those wells showed levels of one type of PFAS was 11 times higher than the proposed limit. DHEC recorded the high level in 2022, before the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recommended the four parts per trillion standard this past spring. All told, the well registered six different types of PFAS.

DHEC has identified sewer sludge as a major potential source of PFAS pollution in rivers and groundwater. Statewide, the agency has approved about 3,500 farm fields as sites for sewer sludge, including areas of eastern South Carolina where wells are polluted with forever chemicals, The State and McClatchy reported in a recent investigative series.

In a brief email to The State, an Elevate Textiles official said the company is working to address “any outstanding issues regarding wastewater processing at the site.’’

The email said the company tries to follow environmental rules and “to employ best industry practices.’’ The official also noted that Elevate Textiles no longer owns the Carlisle Finishing property.

Union County property records show the land, which is more than 700 acres, is owned by two companies with a Monroe, N.C. address: Carlisle WW Holdings LLC and Carlisle Partners LLC. Efforts to reach a representative of the companies were not immediately successful.

The Carlisle Finishing factory was once part of Cone Mills, a national denim and textile manufacturer in North Carolina. The company launched operations in 1955 and became a pillar of the community in tiny Union County. At one point, it had more than 1,100 workers and was the largest employer in the county.

Through the years, the company’s executives won awards from the local chamber of commerce, and Carlisle Finishing was even at one point included on a tour for people interested in the history of Union County.

The plant was sold after Cone Mills declared bankruptcy in 2003, making room for Elevate Textiles to acquire the company. The Carlisle site, while popular among local citizens, isn’t without blemishes. DHEC has made at least eight enforcement cases against Carlisle since 2006 for violations of environmental laws, records show.

McClatchy data journalist Susan Merriam contributed to this story.

This story was originally published July 28, 2023, 10:29 AM.

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Simpsonville family helps Mauldin Miracle League celebrate 15 years of baseball

MAULDIN – Elijah Carlisle anxiously steps to the plate, baseball bat in hand and hopes of a hit twinkling in his eyes.Much to his delight, there is no shortage of vocal support from the crowd gathered at Mauldin’s Sunset Park on a Saturday morning in May.“Next up is Elijah, from the baseball powerhouse of Carlisle Farms,” announces Jeff Powers, prompting a smattering of chuckles.Indeed, the Carlisle family of Simpsonville has produced many a player for the Mauldin Miracle League in ...

MAULDIN – Elijah Carlisle anxiously steps to the plate, baseball bat in hand and hopes of a hit twinkling in his eyes.

Much to his delight, there is no shortage of vocal support from the crowd gathered at Mauldin’s Sunset Park on a Saturday morning in May.

“Next up is Elijah, from the baseball powerhouse of Carlisle Farms,” announces Jeff Powers, prompting a smattering of chuckles.

Indeed, the Carlisle family of Simpsonville has produced many a player for the Mauldin Miracle League in recent years – nine players overall, including six players during the current spring season.

Five-year-old Elijah is the youngest; 20-year-old Tonesha, or Tia, the eldest.

In between, one will find four other Carlisles wearing the shirts of the “Red Sox” squad – Skyler, 7; Serenity, 8; Journey, 11, and David, 19.

Elijah makes contact, which is the goal of the Mauldin Miracle League, both literally and figuratively.

“When you’re out there with them for two seasons a year for this many years, you become close and really build relationships,” said Tammy Carlisle, mom to Elijah and seven other special needs children. “In a typical league, they would age out. But my 19- and 20-year-olds play on the same team as my 5-year-old.”

The Mauldin Miracle League has been affording this opportunity for special needs young people since its founding 15 years ago by Dennis Raines. The league is a volunteer-driven, nonprofit organization with a simple mission – namely, to give every child a chance to play baseball.

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“The part that I enjoy is seeing children with physical or developmental challenges go out and play the game,” said Powers, who serves as the league’s director. “It’s great because we don’t have to worry whether the ball is hit or how many strikes you’re going to get. The goal of the league is to have fun. We’re trying to teach the fundamentals of baseball, but we’re not worried about churning out baseball players.

“It’s also important for the parents and families, who sit in the stands and develop camaraderie and have the ability to share with other parents.”

The league, which draws players from a five-county area in the Upstate, also conducts a fall season in September and October and serves approximately 140 young people between its two seasons each year.

“They’re learning from each other, and you get to see the progress from one season to the next,” said Carlisle, who has had kids playing in the league for each of the past eight years. “It’s more of a family-, community-type situation than just a ball team.

“We’re building relationships with people who are like-minded. They all have some special thing about them, to the point that it makes my kids not feel different. They feel included. They feel a part of it. I love that they feel normal. I can’t even tell you how important it has been for us to be part of this.”

Originally from Winter Haven, Florida, the Carlisles visited Greenville while on vacation in 2010 and left duly impressed.

“We just fell in love with the area,” said Jerry Carlisle, the patriarch of the family who works as a hospice nurse. “We decided that if we could find a house and I could get a job, we’d move here. We moved two months later.”

They also wasted little time in finding the Mauldin Miracle League, and like the countless families who have participated in the league have gained much appreciation for organizations such as Greenville Civitan Charities and the Rotary Club of the Reedy River, as well as the many other businesses, volunteers and private contributions that have kept the group thriving.

Local college and high school baseball teams and other groups regularly serve as “buddies,” assisting the players with batting, running and fielding. The minor league Greenville Drive baseball team of the Class A South Atlantic League hosts the players at downtown Greenville’s Fluor Field once each year while also providing uniform shirts for each of the league's eight teams, six of which play each Saturday and two that play every Tuesday.

All games are held at Mauldin's Sunset Park, a facility that also includes a fully accessible playground to accommodate all-comers, including special needs children.

Despite the frenetic pace around the Carlisle home on Saturday mornings, each game is special and highly anticipated.

Alarm clocks blare early, followed by breakfast and uniforms and caps and excitement.

“It’s chaotic,” Tammy says. “And wonderful.”

By 9:30, the Carlisle’s 15-passenger van is filled.

By 10 a.m., the game is under way, and the fun is contagious.

“We cheer for everything,” Tammy says.

Anything goes. In his first few games, Elijah would hit the ball, drop his bat and immediately retrieve his own ball before running the bases.

No problem.

When she hits the ball, Tia always focuses her stare behind the fence to confirm that her parents are watching. Later, when she crosses home plate, she makes a beeline to Tammy for a high-five, as does each member of the Carlisle contingent.

No score is kept.

Everyone’s happy.

All the players get to bat and get a hit.

Some players run to first base; others run wherever their legs or wheels will carry them.

There’s cheering and clapping and smiling and words of encouragement for each player.

“I love the fact that the kids are accepted for who they are,” Tammy said. “I don’t think my kids know that this is a special league. They just know that they put on their uniforms and they go play ball. And that means everything.”

The Saturday gets even better if Jerry Carlisle decides to make a pit stop on the way home for slushees.

When the crowd piles out of the van, many observers ask Jerry and Tammy if they run a day care.

“No,” they reply. “They’re all ours.”

Even at home, the fun and games are never ending.

“People come into our home, and it’s loud,” Tammy said. “It can be overwhelming.”

And, more often than not, wonderful.

“When you open your heart,” Tammy says, “and invite people in, family happens.”

For more information on the Mauldin Miracle League, visit www.mauldinmiracleleague.com or contact Jeff Powers at (864) 303-2362 or jefflori123@charter.net

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