Criminal Defense Attorney inPiedmont, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
Piedmont, SC

Getting charged with a crime in Piedmont can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in Piedmont, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in Piedmont, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

Criminal Defense Attorney Piedmont, SC

Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for Piedmont criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the Piedmont Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in Piedmont
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in Piedmont can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Law Firm Piedmont, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in Piedmont, SC

DUI penalties in Piedmont can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Piedmont, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in Piedmont, SC

The consequences of a DUI in Piedmont depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in Piedmont, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

Criminal Defense Attorney Piedmont, SC

First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Law Firm Piedmont, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in Piedmont may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Piedmont, SC

Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in Piedmont, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in Piedmont can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in Piedmont can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in Piedmont, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common Piedmont
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in Piedmont, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our Piedmont defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

Criminal Defense Attorney Piedmont, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in Piedmont.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
Piedmont, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in Piedmont can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in Piedmont, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Law Firm Piedmont, SC
 Criminal Defense Lawyer Piedmont, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in Piedmont. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in Piedmont include:

Criminal Defense Attorney Piedmont, SC
  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in Piedmont, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

Ask us anything

Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in Piedmont, SC

Here's how 3 Upstate SC parks and recreation areas will spend $1.3M in federal grants

Thirteen recreation projects across South Carolina will see upgrades and improvements on park grounds, boating docks and more as a total of $4.2 million in federal Land and Water Conservation Funds (LWCF) were awarded throughout the state at the end of January.Three of those thirteen projects will enhance Upstate based parks as Piedmont Riverfront Park (Anderson), Duncan Park (Spartanburg), and Gower Park (Greenville) will see a total of $1.3 million of LWCF dollars applied to their enrichment plans.These federal funds come in ...

Thirteen recreation projects across South Carolina will see upgrades and improvements on park grounds, boating docks and more as a total of $4.2 million in federal Land and Water Conservation Funds (LWCF) were awarded throughout the state at the end of January.

Three of those thirteen projects will enhance Upstate based parks as Piedmont Riverfront Park (Anderson), Duncan Park (Spartanburg), and Gower Park (Greenville) will see a total of $1.3 million of LWCF dollars applied to their enrichment plans.

These federal funds come in response to increased activity at local parks amid the COVID-19 pandemic, said Samantha Queen, director of communications at S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism.

In 2020 outdoor recreation increased as people looked for safe, socially distanced activities. The influx of visitors put a larger demand on parks across the state, Queen said.

In addition, the expansion of Paris Mountain alongside Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area will provide more acreage to two of the more popular state parks, which are intended to provide more access points to greenspaces into northern Greenville County, she added.

The 2022 LWCF grant recipients were selected based upon plans and their history of maintaining their parks and administering grants.

Park project upgrades are not expected to begin until summer or fall of 2023 and could expand well into 2024 depending upon the remaining funding needed to complete the upgrades.

Here are the parks that received federal grant funding in the Upstate and will see a major overhaul in upcoming years.

Gower Park Renovation, City of Greenville

? Federal Grant Total: $500,000 ? Total Project Cost: $1,400,000

The spider-web cracks seen on the basketball and tennis grounds are soon to disappear as Gower Park's ball courts will be reupholstered with a resurfaced asphalt for safer hoops and racket-based activities.

Gower Park will also add eight new pickleball courts to the property with an additional renovation headed to the parking lot, which is slated to begin later in 2023, said Jeff Waters, senior capital projects manager at the city of Greenville.

"We want to improve the assets we have to make sure it's safe, attractive and user friendly," Waters said. "We're excited about the new look and making our parks more enjoyable."

Waters anticipates the remaining $900,000 dollars to come from a neighborhood improvement bond package fund, and shortly after those funds are secured, the construction portion of the project will go out to bid.

Duncan Park, City of Spartanburg

? Federal Grant Total: $300,000 ? Total Project Cost: $600,000

In collaboration with PAL Spartanburg, the city of Spartanburg will upgrade the Mary Black Foundation Rail Trail with just over a mile worth of asphalt upgrades that will expand out across Union Street.

The project will also address the invasive plant species that are beginning to take over the biosystem as Privet, Wisteria, and Eleganus flowers are growing up alongside the trees and choking out the native plants.

"We want to enrich that area naturally," said Ned Barrett trail development manager of PAL Spartanburg. "Duncan Park is a really great property in the middle of the city. The lake is not used, and the woods don't see the same activity as the baseball stadium or tennis courts. We want to activate that entire property to make it available for more people to use."

The final park upgrade will see the reconstruction of a 40-foot wooden bridge and be rebuilt with aluminum materials for easier maintenance and upkeep, Barrett said.

The city of Spartanburg will contribute the remaining $300,000 dollars to the overall project with a timeline of early 2024 for its full completion.

Piedmont Riverfront Park Phase One, Anderson County

? Federal Grant Awarded: $500,000 ? Total Project Cost: $1,210,065

An expansion of the Saluda River Rally and Rhythm on the River are on the horizon as phase one of the 48-mile river corridor development project will introduce additional ADA-compliant kayaking docks for safe launch and takeouts to-and-from the river.

Phase one is the beginning of a six-section project which will eventually connect Powdersville to Ware Sholas via the Saluda River, and additionally promote fishing, walking, experiencing wildlife and duck hunting as a shoreline trail will come with the project upgrade.

"It will fit in neatly with our plans of the Saluda River Blue Trail," said Rusty Burns, Anderson County Administrator. "There will be plenty of room for everyone to enjoy the camp trail, getting back to nature and even concerts by the river.

Anderson County has a favorable notice to secure the remaining funds for phase one of the project, yet the source of where it will come from is unknown at the time, said Matt Schell, parks manager for Anderson County.

There is anticipation of the project to conclude near the end of fall 2023.

– A.J. Jackson covers the food & dining scene, along with arts, entertainment and more for The Greenville News and Anderson Independent Mail. Contact him by email at ajackson@gannett.com, and follow him on Twitter @ajhappened.

Developers move forward with Piedmont riverfront community

This story first appeared in the Feb. 21 print edition of GSA Business Report.Developers of a green townhouse community on the banks of a Saluda River mill dam plan to break ground this spring after a two-year pause.In 2019, Red Oak Developers went public with plans to create a hydro-powered residential development within the bones of 1876-era Piedmont Mill One.Only a smokestack stands from the original mil...

This story first appeared in the Feb. 21 print edition of GSA Business Report.

Developers of a green townhouse community on the banks of a Saluda River mill dam plan to break ground this spring after a two-year pause.

In 2019, Red Oak Developers went public with plans to create a hydro-powered residential development within the bones of 1876-era Piedmont Mill One.

Only a smokestack stands from the original mill itself following a 1983 fire, but at one point, according to the S.C. Historic Properties Record, Piedmont Manufacturing’s Henry Hammett built out the property to be one of the largest textile plants in the world in the 1800s.

The Saluda River dam, a footbridge across the river between two of the Piedmont mill sites and a soon-to-be renovated mercantile space remain, laying the groundwork for what Red Oak Developer’s Brad Skelton hopes will become a “cool urban living” space.

The area is “prime for the pickings,” he said, with Piedmont’s close proximity to Greenville and cheaper property than in most municipalities in the county. The historic structures and corresponding tax credits also sweeten the pot.

“I think it will be more of a millennial vibe maybe. In the town of Piedmont itself, which is contiguous, there are several developers who are already upfitting some of the old building there,” he said. “There’s already a co-work space in an old bank there.”

Plans for the refurbished mercantile space will also cater to the younger demographic: a coffee shop, taphouse, cafe and five art studios committed to lease the space several years ago, according to developer KDS Commercial Properties.

Skelton aims to build out 90 to 105 three-level townhomes in Piedmont Village, as well as 25,000-square-feet of commercial space set to house the Saluda Falls Brewery. An eight-foot pedestrian bridge will be reconstructed on the Anderson County side of the Saluda River, which will be dotted with kayak put-ins and accompanied by a trail network once the community is complete.

“We’ve got a builder — we’re probably 90 to 120 days before we start moving dirt down there,” he said, adding that he couldn’t share his contractor yet. “We’ve got all of our due diligence down, we bought the property, we own it.”

The CEO and owner of Red Oak Development is less sure today that the community’s reliance on the Piedmont Hydro Electric Project for power will come through — “there’s still an outside chance that could happen,” he said — but the village will still center around green building practices and designers will pursue LEED certification.

Semi-underground waste and recycling containers distributed by Greenville-based Sutera will be installed across the property, limiting leakage and pollution into the river.

“You don’t have to build an enclosure, you don’t have to have a dumpster, you don’t have all that juice coming out,” Skelton said. “Everything stays in the container: it’s a much more environmentally sound unit.”

Coldwell Banker Caine signed on in 2019 as the community’s real estate partner.

Former mill village Piedmont becoming a center of affordable new home activity

It’s not an incorporated town, but a census-designated area along the Saluda River best known for once being home to one of the largest textile mills in the world. The mill that birthed the place known as Piedmont burned down in the 1980s, and today only a lone smokestack remains. But it’s being discovered once again, because it’s home to one of the scarcest assets in metro Greenville—affordable housing.Once a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Greenville and Anderson counties meet, Piedmont is becoming more and...

It’s not an incorporated town, but a census-designated area along the Saluda River best known for once being home to one of the largest textile mills in the world. The mill that birthed the place known as Piedmont burned down in the 1980s, and today only a lone smokestack remains. But it’s being discovered once again, because it’s home to one of the scarcest assets in metro Greenville—affordable housing.

Once a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Greenville and Anderson counties meet, Piedmont is becoming more and more a destination for both prospective homebuyers and real estate agents searching for lower-priced homes in a market where such things have become very difficult to find. Half a dozen new home communities have sprung up around Piedmont, which features an official population of just 5,400, but average home prices which can be $50,000 less than those in the city of Greenville itself.

“Piedmont has seen tremendous growth in recent years from a residential perspective, and a new construction perspective at that, because builders are able to offer more affordable options than they would in nearby areas such as Mauldin and Simpsonville,” said Norell Mitchell Grissett, a Coldwell Banker Caine agent who’s active in the area. “Historically, land prices have been cheaper in Piedmont. And so in turn, the builders have the opportunity to offer lower prices on the homes that they would build in comparison to some more saturated areas of the Upstate.”

According to the Western Upstate Association of Realtors, the median sales price in Piedmont in January was $291,450, a 48.8 percent jump from the $195,900 of the same month in 2020. But that remains a bargain compared to January average prices of $335,000 in Fountain Inn, $353,750 in Mauldin, $360,000 in the city of Greenville north of downtown, and $650,000 in central Greenville, according to the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors.

A surge of new-home communities

And although inventory shortages exist everywhere within the greater Greenville area, Piedmont’s available supply of less expensive, developable land means more new home communities with less sticker shock. Grissett, who works for Coldwell Banker Caine’s new home division, represents Great Southern Homes, an Irmo-based company that’s building Harvest Glen, a new community that will be comprised of around 200 homes with prices starting in the low $200,000s.

Harvest Glen is approaching 100 sales in just under a year since opening, so the demand is clearly there. And Great Southern Homes is hardly the only new home builder operating in Piedmont—Cambridge Walk and Bracken Woods by D.R. Horton are offering floor plans starting in the high $200,000s, Barrington Creek by Ryan Homes is offering homes from the mid-$200,00s, and Attenborough by Eastwood Homes is offering townhomes from the mid-$200,000s.

“I think the amount of new construction offerings in Piedmont has just increased within the last few years,” Grissett said. “And I think based off the market statistics that I’ve been seeing, that trend is only going to continue. I think there’s going to be an additional surge of new communities, builders and consumers that are drawn to this area. The need for affordable housing is not going anywhere. And Piedmont will continue to offer our market a solution to that problem for some time.”

Some Greenville real estate agents will readily admit that they had never even been to Piedmont before the pandemic-fueled buying frenzy that started in mid-2020 and continues today. The area’s claim to fame was once Piedmont Manufacturing Company, a textile mill that opened in 1874 and by the turn of the century was the largest in South Carolina. But by 1977, its textile-producing days were over, according to the National Park Service, and a 1983 fire burned down a facility that had been designated a National Historic Landmark.

Since then, Piedmont has existed mainly at the fringes of Greenville’s industrial and manufacturing rebirth. Even now, “you do feel like you’re tucked away,” Grissett said. “It has a little more rural, country feel to it. It’s a little quieter, a little more laid back. But it is so close to downtown Greenville. You have shopping off West Georgia and Fairview roads. And you have easy access to that corridor of shopping on Butler Road in Mauldin. So while you have the feeling of being pulled away a little bit, you do have access to things that are convenient.”

Retail and redevelopment hopes

And almost certainly, Piedmont’s surge of new home construction will bring more nearby conveniences along with it; “retail follows rooftops,” after all, is a real estate adage that’s stood the test of time. Michelin and Lockheed Martin are among the major employers nearby, and the area now has two grocery stores anchoring shopping plazas. And “there’s absolutely going to be a need” for more commercial retail developments, Grissett added, as more new homeowners move into the area. A local developer, Larry Webb, even aims to redevelop Piedmont’s former mill village itself. State money has been earmarked to build a new pedestrian bridge over the Saluda River, and a taproom and coffee shop are planned for an old mercantile building. The ultimate goal is a picturesque riverfront downtown, just like Greenville’s.

Meanwhile, the new home building boom in Piedmont shows no signs of letting up. As of last week, Grissett had only two available homes remaining in Harvest Glen’s current phase, with a an additional phase set to come online soon. If current building trends hold—always an uncertain proposition given the supply chain issues that have hamstrung builders throughout the Upstate—the Piedmont area could soon have hundreds more new homes and thousands more new residents than it did only a few years ago.

“It would not surprise me to see 1,000 new homes within a few years’ time here, because you do have some communities that are a little bit larger than Harvest Glen, so I think you have to account for them,” Grissett said. “Some of them have closed out just fairly recently, where they went into Piedmont a few years prior to Great Southern Homes entering that market. But because those communities did so well, they now have other areas that they’re selling out of. So I would not be surprised to see those numbers increase.”

GETTING ANSWERS: River Road follow up

PIEDMONT, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - We have reached over 1,000 Getting Answers submissions, thanks to you.This week, we are following up on a road we covered last year, River Road.This road is in Piedmont—mostly in Anderson County, but it also crosses over to Greenville County. You’ll find it between Highway 81 and Highway 86. It runs parallel to The Saluda River.Last year, the state’s Department of Transportation told us they paved from Highway 153 to I-85. We noticed new pavement in the area. And b...

PIEDMONT, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - We have reached over 1,000 Getting Answers submissions, thanks to you.

This week, we are following up on a road we covered last year, River Road.

This road is in Piedmont—mostly in Anderson County, but it also crosses over to Greenville County. You’ll find it between Highway 81 and Highway 86. It runs parallel to The Saluda River.

Last year, the state’s Department of Transportation told us they paved from Highway 153 to I-85. We noticed new pavement in the area. And bids were set to go out in December 2021 for the rest of the road.

The pothole problems start from the V-Go gas station near the bridge over 85 until Highway 86. Highway 81 to Highway 153 isn’t nearly as bad.

We covered this story back in June. Here we are, over a year later, and drivers tell us they are still waiting for the rest of the road to be paved.

We asked drivers if they’ve noticed a difference over the last year or so.

“Not on these roads here,” said Elena Boulding.

“No, the only difference is, it has gotten worse; more traffic, more cars, more damage to the road itself, the shoulders, and whatnot,” said Shawn Duchac.

The SCDOT told us they were doing a full-depth reclamation, repaving with asphalt after the reclamation process—reconstructing the roadway base throughout. The road is a part of their 2022 resurfacing project. It has been six months since bids went out. Boulding says the road isn’t improving.

“Horrendous. I had to change my tires because it had two knots from the potholes,” Boulding said.

Zachary Hong says he only drives River Road when he passes through traveling.

“I have to go this way, go that way to avoid those bumpy areas,” Hong said.

Hong drives a Tesla. And there’s a charging station at the V-Go, in Piedmont, where the potholes start.

“Boom! Boom! You can feel it. And you can... sometimes, it’s like your head is touching the ceiling,” said Hong.

Duchac says bikes can feel it too.

“I also ride a motorcycle. So, you hit a pothole on a motorcycle, it’s not very forgiving,” Duchac said, “And I’ve been there and done that.”

Duchac takes his truck now, which has four-wheel drive. He says due to how busy River Road is, the pavement has got to hold up. The SCDOT says about 5,700 vehicles can see this road daily.

“I get in early, around seven o’clock, and the traffic is overwhelming,” Duchac said.

That’s why having paved roads are important to these drivers. They asked us, what about the rest of the road?

“It’s a problem that needs some real solutions. Instead of just pushing it to each other, ‘It’s not my problem,’” said Hong.

The DOT says a solution is coming. River Road is a part of a larger project with several other roads. These things take time. It’s under contract. The anticipated completion time is July 2023, though Boulding says she isn’t holding out hope.

“I don’t see any changes there. So, I would say no, but you never know,” said Boulding.

We will follow up again Summer 2023.

Submit a roadway here.

Copyright 2022 WHNS. All rights reserved.

Historic site purchased for Piedmont museum, but funding is still needed

A.J. JacksonAt 73 years old, Danny Oliver can remember riding his tricycle on the wooden front porch of his childhood home in Piedmont and also driving his three-wheeler through the kitchen, burning to pretend rubber while turning laps around the dining room table.Many years before the Oliver family kitchen served as Danny's racetrack, the home near the old Piedmont M...

A.J. Jackson

At 73 years old, Danny Oliver can remember riding his tricycle on the wooden front porch of his childhood home in Piedmont and also driving his three-wheeler through the kitchen, burning to pretend rubber while turning laps around the dining room table.

Many years before the Oliver family kitchen served as Danny's racetrack, the home near the old Piedmont Manufacturing mill site operated as a multi-denominational Piedmont Union Church when it was built in 1878. It was recognized as the first building in South Carolina dedicated to being a YWCA facility in 1908.

It's been unoccupied in recent years.

"There's houses near the old mill starting to crumble," said Dianne Young, older sister of Danny Oliver. "I didn't want to see momma and daddy's house like that."

The white colonial-style house is now safe from the dangers of decay, demolition, and development as the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society has purchased the home from the Oliver family.

The selling price went for $140,000, which was $13,000 below the appraisal price for the .72-acre property, according to Anne Peden, chairperson of the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society.

The preservation group's intention is to rededicate the building to be a museum to commemorate the Piedmont Manufacturing Company, local textile mill history, and contribution to the local economy.

Yet, more financial help is needed to open what is to be known as the Piedmont History Museum.

"It's where it needs to be," said Darlene Peden, another sister of Danny Oliver who also grew up in the home. "You've got a lot of people who love it. I want my house saved."

The new museum is to be a centerpiece for a revitalized Piedmont, as the area is expected to have tremendous growth over the next decade.

Grants and private donors bring Piedmont museum to life

"We've been working towards this about four to five years," said Anne Peden, sister-in-law of Darlene. "We want to be the place (where) the new people come in and understand that this was the textile center of the world."

The rich history of the residence made the historic site the desired location for the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society’s museum.

“That was our first choice when we started talking about getting a place for the museum,” Anne Peden said. “We didn’t dream we’d ever be able to come up with the money to buy it.”

In late 2021, the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society submitted a grant request for $53,000 to the Greenville County Historic & Natural Resources Trust.

The house at 7 Piedmont Avenue was ultimately awarded the grant and became the only historic site to receive funding among five other natural-resource preservation efforts during that grant's cycle, according to Carlton Owen, chair at GCHNRT.

“The 220,000 people coming to Greenville (in years to come through growth) don't know the story of the textile history,” Owen said. “If we wish to continue to compete for and win funds from outside the county, it is vital that we exhibit the importance of those projects by being among the first to invest.”

“This was a project we were definitely excited to fund,” said Alex Reynolds, board member of GCHNRT. “We have a vested interest in making sure this project is continuing."

Beyond the $53,000, the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society acquired $75,000 through a land-bank program and an additional $140,000 from Steve Bichel, a local retired electrical engineer.

“I knew a lot of people from Piedmont and have a lot of respect for those folks” said Bichel, a graduate of Woodmont High who grew up near the local mill. “I’m extremely supportive of redevelopment and zoning, but some developers have no concern for history whatsoever...

“It's a combination of things: a reconnection with Piedmont, my father working in other nearby mills, and to raise awareness of the project,” he said. “At least give 5 or 10% of what I gave. I challenge people to do the same."

Money still needed to open new museum in Greenville County

The purchase of the former YWCA, Union church and Oliver family historic home is a first step, but a long list of upgrades will require more financial help to bring the building up to date to function as a museum.

As of early September, the list of building improvements amounts to $460,000, which includes estimates of:

“The purchase of the building and the preservation of our museum is the first step towards our goal of having a state-of-the-art facility here in Piedmont, South Carolina, said Charlene Spelts, marketing and communications lead for the Piedmont Historical Preservation Society. "We've set ourselves a goal on 12 to 14 months to open.

"Money is the biggest thing we need.”

The museum could open as soon as the fall of 2023. It's to feature eight rooms for educational programming, which will be open three days a week for free, and also feature meeting rooms and space for homeschooling.

There will be antiques, including various artifacts dating back to 1818, some from Don Roper's mill collection that he's gathered since 1950, as well as an organ from the original Baptist church in Piedmont.

The new space for the museum is to house it all.

"Now that we have it, we have a lot of responsibility," said Anne Peden. "Owning a public building — although we are thrilled and it's a blessing — it's a little bit daunting.

"Now we've got to keep it up and make it live a long life as a museum, and every bit helps."

– A.J. Jackson overs arts, entertainment and more for The Greenville News and Anderson Independent Mail. Contact hum by email at ajackson@gannett.com, and follow him on Twitter @ajhappened.

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