Criminal Defense Attorney inTigerville, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
Tigerville, SC

Getting charged with a crime in Tigerville can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in Tigerville, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in Tigerville, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC

Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for Tigerville criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the Tigerville Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in Tigerville
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in Tigerville can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in Tigerville, SC

DUI penalties in Tigerville can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Tigerville, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in Tigerville, SC

The consequences of a DUI in Tigerville depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in Tigerville, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC

First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in Tigerville may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

 Criminal Defense Lawyer Tigerville, SC

Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in Tigerville, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in Tigerville can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in Tigerville can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in Tigerville, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common Tigerville
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in Tigerville, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our Tigerville defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in Tigerville.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
Tigerville, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in Tigerville can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in Tigerville, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC
 Criminal Defense Lawyer Tigerville, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in Tigerville. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in Tigerville include:

Criminal Defense Attorney Tigerville, SC
  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in Tigerville, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

Ask us anything

Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in Tigerville, SC

Fire damages Upstate church

SHAREGREENVILLE COUNTY, S.C. (WSPA) – Multiple agencies responded to a church fire in Taylors.The Tigerville Fire Department said first responders arrived at Camp Creek Baptist Church located at 116 Camp Creek Road.The cause of the fire is unknown at this time.Officials are on the scene investigating the fire.Copyright 2024 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Read next >...

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GREENVILLE COUNTY, S.C. (WSPA) – Multiple agencies responded to a church fire in Taylors.

The Tigerville Fire Department said first responders arrived at Camp Creek Baptist Church located at 116 Camp Creek Road.

The cause of the fire is unknown at this time.

Officials are on the scene investigating the fire.

Copyright 2024 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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Here are the Greenville County Schools with the most significant academic growth, performance

Greenville County Schools were recognized for significant academic growth and performance during the 2022-23 school year at the Superintendent’s Academic Achievement Awards celebration, according to a press release from GCS.Awards were presented one week after the South Carolina Department of Education released the 2022-2023 test scores for South Carolina Colleg...

Greenville County Schools were recognized for significant academic growth and performance during the 2022-23 school year at the Superintendent’s Academic Achievement Awards celebration, according to a press release from GCS.

Awards were presented one week after the South Carolina Department of Education released the 2022-2023 test scores for South Carolina College and Career-Ready Assessments (SC READY) for English Language Arts and Mathematics along with South Carolina Palmetto Assessment of State Standards (SCPASS) for Science.

“Today, we recognized schools with top performance and greatest improvement, and I’m extremely proud of the hard work and dedication of our students, staff and leadership of our principals,” said GCS Superintendent Dr. Burke Royster. “Greenville County Schools significantly outperformed the state of South Carolina, made substantial gains and remains nationally competitive.”

The press release cited statistics from Spring 2022 to Spring 2023:

Greenville County elementary schools

?94% Posted Positive Growth in ELA

?61% Posted Positive Growth in Math

?41% Posted Positive Growth in Science

Greenville County middle schools

?95% Posted Positive Growth in ELA

?82% Posted Positive Growth in Math

?41% Posted Positive Growth in Science

Greenville County high schools

?41% Posted Positive Growth in English 2

?71% Posted Positive Growth in Algebra 1

?59% Posted Positive Growth in Biology

Overall highest performance

The following schools achieved the highest overall performance from spring 2022 to spring 2023:

?Elementary: Augusta Circle

?Middle: Riverside

?High: Riverside

Overall highest growth

The following schools achieved the highest overall growth from spring 2022 to spring 2023:

?Elementary: Crestview

?Middle: Northwest

?High: GCS Virtual School, Mauldin and Southside

What to know:Greenville County elementary, middle school test scores outperform SC

Top 10% highest performance

The following schools were in the top 10% for achieving the highest performance in the subject areas of ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies from the spring 2022 to spring 2023:

Elementary

ELA: Augusta Circle; Sterling; Oakview; Stone; Buena Vista

Math: Sterling; Augusta Circle; Stone; Tigerville; Buena Vista

Science: Augusta Circle; Sterling; Gateway; Stone; Tigerville

Middle

ELA: Blue Ridge; Riverside

Math: Riverside; Northwood

Science: Rudolph Gordon; League

High Schools

English 2: Riverside; Mauldin; Greenville Early College; GCS Virtual School

Algebra 1: Greenville Early College; Mauldin; Woodmont

Biology: Riverside; Mauldin

US History: Riverside; Mauldin

Top 10% highest growth

The following schools were in the top 10% for achieving highest growth in the subject areas of ELA, Math and Science from the spring 2022 to spring 2023.

Elementary Schools

ELA: Slater-Marietta; Crestview; Cherrydale; Bryson; Sara Collins

Math: Crestview; Gateway; Slater-Marietta; Brook Glenn; Armstrong

Science: Gateway; Sara Collins; Mauldin; Sterling; Brushy Creek; Ellen Woodside

Middle Schools

ELA: Northwest; Blue Ridge

Math: Northwest; Blue Ridge

Science: Beck; Rudolph Gordon

High Schools

English 2: J.L. Mann; Mauldin; GCS Virtual School

Algebra 1: Greenville Early College; GCS Virtual School; Southside; Greer

Biology: Carolina; Greer

Ice Cream, Animals, and Fun at Famoda Farm near Greenville, SC

Have you heard of Famoda Farm in Tigerville, SC? We just had the most amazing afternoon visiting the farm, enjoying delicious ice cream, and hanging out with baby goats! The cows, donkeys, bunnies, and sheep joined us at the fence to visit, and we even picked up some fresh milk to bring home. This is a special place, I mean like turn a “grumpy preteen” day into a “sunshine-filled happy day” kind of place. Do you know how rare that is? It’s awesome, which means we’re telling you all abou...

Have you heard of Famoda Farm in Tigerville, SC? We just had the most amazing afternoon visiting the farm, enjoying delicious ice cream, and hanging out with baby goats! The cows, donkeys, bunnies, and sheep joined us at the fence to visit, and we even picked up some fresh milk to bring home.

This is a special place, I mean like turn a “grumpy preteen” day into a “sunshine-filled happy day” kind of place. Do you know how rare that is? It’s awesome, which means we’re telling you all about Famoda Farm so you can plan your visit.

Arriving at Famoda Farm

The entrance to Famoda Farms is a gravel driveway with pasture on either side. Just plug the address into your GPS and look for the signs. Even my preteens and teenage kids were stoked to see the cows in the pasture as we drove in. You think it’s cute when little kids love animals. Well, hearing “Aw, there are cows! Hi Cows!” will melt your heart when it comes out of the mouth of a fourteen-year-old boy, too.

Ice Cream at Famoda Farm

Amazing Grazin’ Hand Dipped Ice Cream is the newest addition to Famoda Farm. You’ll find their cute ice cream truck beside the farm store with a wide array of seating options in the shade.

There are quite a few ice cream flavors to choose from, plus toppings that can be added. Choose a cup or cone variety. My kids always go with the “ice cream in a cup and a cone on top option”, having been raised from tots to enjoy the cone without the stress of racing to polish off a melting, dripping cone. But, you know, you do you.

There was one dairy-free option – a lime daiquiri sorbet- that I enjoyed.

Things to Do at Famoda Farm

The ice cream is good, but the animals are the best part, in my humble opinion. Where else can you go enjoy some ice cream and then wander around hanging out with adorable farm animals? Nowhere! There is no admission fee to the farm, so checking out the animals is totally free and you definitely don’t want to skip this part.

Visit with cows, donkeys, bunnies, a sheep, and goats at the Lovin’ Barn. Most of the animals are in pastures, but a few of the older goats roamed with supervision. They aren’t allowed over by the ice cream though, so don’t worry, you won’t have any goats trying to steal your dessert.

Some wonderful people at the farm told us about the animals and even walked us over to the baby goats in the barn. Yes, there were baby goats in the barn and yes, we got to pet them.

In the barn, depending on the day, you also may find any of Famoda Farm’s other younger cows, Twinkles the sheep, the other goats, and maybe even some baby animals!

The babies in the barn were 2-3 months old and full of energy when we went in 2022. Of the older goats that roamed outside the pasture, one of the youngest is Billy. He’s a little over a year old and super sweet. The other two goats are Fancie and Mama Goat. Fancie is the tan goat and she was not into pets, preferring to meander to a new patch of grass to munch when approached. Mama Goat is the largest goat and she spent most of her time relaxing in the shade.

If you visit when it’s time for one of the calves to have a bottle, you can have a turn giving them the bottle! When we visited at the end of August 2022, the baby cow, Rusty, was just 6 days old and super enthusiastic about his bottle. There’s no cost to interact with the animals or feed the babies. In the future, the farm plans to bring in more bottle-fed babies, giving families a chance to participate in the work that goes into raising animals on the farm by feeding them.

And just because this is seriously cool, and Rusty and his little “moos” for his bottle are so stinking cute, here’s another Rusty bottle photo.

There is an outdoor play space with climbing equipment, a see-saw, and more fun things for younger kids. All of the equipment is spread out across a shaded lawn, perfectly inviting even in the summer heat. This is a great spot for the kids to run off some of that ice cream before popping them back in the car.

Grazers: Farm Store at Famoda Farm

The farm store, called Grazers has lots of local items like raw milk, Happy Cow milk, local cheese, and local meats. You’ll also find pottery, candles, and other locally made items that would make excellent gifts.

Event Space

Famoda Farm also has a beautiful barn event space that can be rented for weddings, baby showers, and really any large gathering.

Beef Shares

Famoda Farms offers full or half shares of beef, either 400 or 800 pounds. They process five or six per month and you can even pick out your cow if you want and meat cuts. The price is $10/pound and the farm uses zero additives or hormones.

Famoda Farm: Our Review

I’m trying to figure out if I can justify taking the kids out for ice cream again tomorrow, too. Or, maybe we’ll finish that whole gallon of milk I just bought tomorrow morning so we can go back and buy some more.

Truly, it was one of the best summer afternoons I’ve had with the kids this year.

The farm is perfectly set up for families to enjoy. If you like ice cream, if you like animals, if you just need a gallon of milk, go visit. I don’t think you’ll regret it.

It’s a farm. There are animals and that means poo, insects, and even those pesky fire ants. Closed-toed shoes would be a good choice if you plan to walk around by the animals.

You can pet all the animals that come to the fence, just be mindful of the wire on the inside of the fences. They are electric, they are on, and they will hurt if you touch them.

Hours: Ice cream is open Friday and Saturday from 12 pm to 9 pm, and Sunday from 4 pm to 9 pmGrazers (farm store) is open Wednesday – Friday 10 am to 6 pm, Saturday 9 am to 1 pm

Please note that when the farm has festivals like their Fall Festival in October, the animals will be moved to the festival grounds (3 Camp Creek Rd). Admission is charged for these festivals.

Famoda Farm7410 Mountain View Road, Taylors

Developer takes Greenville County to court after board quashes his housing project

A developer wants his day in court after an energized Greenville County planning board reversed course on a housing project in northern Greenville County, quashing it a month after giving it the green light.In a 4-2 decision at its July 25 meeting to reject Ethan Richard Estates, the Greenville County Planning Commission cited a new rule — Article 3.1 of the county's Land Development Regulations — that allows that body to reject subdivisions that are not "compatible with the surrounding land use density...

A developer wants his day in court after an energized Greenville County planning board reversed course on a housing project in northern Greenville County, quashing it a month after giving it the green light.

In a 4-2 decision at its July 25 meeting to reject Ethan Richard Estates, the Greenville County Planning Commission cited a new rule — Article 3.1 of the county's Land Development Regulations — that allows that body to reject subdivisions that are not "compatible with the surrounding land use density" or the site's environmental conditions. In June, that same body had approved the project.

Article 3.1, added in March, has given the planning commission broad, unprecedented powers to control the direction of growth in Greenville County. The commission invoked it in the rejection of at least three other proposed subdivisions in July and August.

More:How Greenville County's new development rules helped communities reject two subdivisions

More:Another two subdivisions fall amid Greenville County push to preserve quality of life

The Ethan Richard Estates neighborhood was proposed along a rural section of Tigerville Road. Homes in the 31-house subdivision would have lot sizes averaging 0.56 acres within a 23.6-acre footprint. Its 11 neighboring lots average 4.8 acres each.

Critics of the project, more than 30 of whom showed up at the commission's public meeting in June, complained the development would perpetuate urban sprawl in an area where the nearest grocery store, in Travelers Rest, is 5.6 miles away.

The developer, Bruce Niemitalo, challenged the Greenville County Planning Commission's July decision to kill the project, saying in legal documents that the board's original approval of the project in June had prompted him to invest time and money for several weeks.

County records show the development company, Niemitalo Inc., purchased a lion's share of the proporty, 22.7 acres, in April for $330,000.

The commission had placed several conditions on the project's June approval, including widening a cul-de-sac in the subdivision so that fire trucks could get in and out.

Julie Turner, who owns a small horse farm across Tigerville Road from the proposed development, has helped organized grassroots opposition to the Ethan Richard Estates project. She was among those in the packed meeting room when the subdivision application was originally approved. Article 3.1, she said, was not properly considered at that meeting because discussion veered toward whether the 26.8-acre property was zoned.

Article 3.1, planning commission members have since clarified, applies regardless of any zoning-related development restrictions.

"We were livid for obvious reasons," Turner said. "We got together and tried to figure out if there was an appeal process."

Turner said her group approached Greenville County Councilman Joe Dill, who represents the Tigerville area, and learned he could take the matter to the County Council and have them send the subdivision back to the Planning Commission for reconsideration.

He did that on July 17, the County Council supported him unanimously, and the matter was added to the commission's July 25 meeting agenda the next day.

Turner and her neighbors have prepared dozens of pages of supporting documents in their battle against Ethan Richard Estates, including a photo illustration, which The News reviewed and was able to recreate, showing the proposed development in the context of surrounding properties.

"Not to belabor Article 3.1, but a picture can speak 1,000 words," she said in an email.

The county's Land Development Regulations are silent on how the planning commission can reconsider subdivision applications.

The minutes of the July 25 planning commission meeting reflect how unusual the situation was, and commission member Chris Harrison expressed reservations at the time:

Mr. Harrison stated he was an open minded person and was happy to reconsider (the Ethan Richard Estates preliminary subdivision application). He cautioned the Commission, this was the first time this had ever happened ... he felt this should not become a habit by any stretch of the imagination.

Niemitalo received official notice of the commission's reversal on Aug. 22 and filed an appeal in state court Sept. 21.

"The Planning Commission's purported reconsideration and revocation of its prior approval of Plaintiff's application was arbitrary, capricious, unreasonable and beyond its lawfully delegated authority," the appeal documents say.

In the appeal, Niemitalo also complains that his development team did not receive reasonable notice that the planning commission was reconsidering his project at its July meeting.

He says he learned about the planning commission's decision to take another look at his project at 3:30 p.m. July 25 — one hour before the meeting. The appeal documents include an email from Paula Gucker, the county's assistant administrator for community planning:

Hey there. Just in case no one in Subdivisions told you. [sic] Mr Dill sent Ethan Richards back for PC to reconsider. It is the last item on the agenda today. Mtg starts at 4:30.

The project's reconsideration was included in an agenda posted online a week before the July planning commission meeting. Dill's request to send the project back to the planning commission for reconsideration was also listed in the County Council's July 17 agenda.

In his appeal, Niemitalo asks the planning commission to stick to its original approval of the project and to pay damages.

Stokely Holder, an attorney for Niemitalo, declined to comment on details of the case.

"With all due respect to you and your profession, I have no intention of trying to litigate this matter in the media," Holder said in an email to The News.

County Attorney Mark Tollison also declined comment. The county has a couple more weeks to respond to the appeal in court.

"We are reviewing the appeal and are in the process of filing an appropriate response to Circuit Court on behalf of the Planning Commission," Tollison said in an email.

As tensions simmer, ReWa resolves to limit expansion into Northern Greenville County

Fred Kissling has lived in the rural, northern Greenville County community of Tigerville for more than 40 years.In a county that has seen drastic changes and development during that time, Tigerville’s quiet, agrarian lifestyle has been a form of solace for him and others in the community.But in the past few years, a simmering tension has been building between local residents and Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the primary wastewater treatment service provider in Greenville County....

Fred Kissling has lived in the rural, northern Greenville County community of Tigerville for more than 40 years.

In a county that has seen drastic changes and development during that time, Tigerville’s quiet, agrarian lifestyle has been a form of solace for him and others in the community.

But in the past few years, a simmering tension has been building between local residents and Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the primary wastewater treatment service provider in Greenville County.

The conflict began when ReWa purchased about 75 acres of land off Highway 414, including 50 acres acquired in 2020 through eminent domain.

“Lack of communication is what got things off on the wrong foot. [ReWa] never communicated things formally or clearly along the way, and that left the community to investigate and find out on our own.” -Jimmy Epting, former president, North Greenville University

ReWa promised that its goal was to build a new facility that would only serve to meet the needs of North Greenville University and a subdivision known as Cherokee Valley. The new facility, ReWa stated, would “not be designed to accommodate future growth in the area,” according to Chad Lawson, ReWa’s Director of Communications.

But residents like Kissling argued a new facility would only need a small fraction of that acreage, and questions arose as to whether the new treatment facility would be the first step in developing the area and destroying the rural beauty Kissling and others have come to love.

“It’s a problem, because what I would say is the overwhelming community desire is to just leave this place alone,” Kissling said. “But boy, sometimes it seems that is not well-understood.”

Lawmakers heard those concerns, and this past February, a group that included state Senator Tom Corbin, state Representative Mike Burns, County Councilman Joe Dill and members of the Tigerville Executive Community Committee sent a letter to ReWa asking for clarity on the true purpose of the treatment facility. The letter also asked for assurances that ReWa would meet the community’s “terms of agreement for coexistence.”

On Monday, April 19, lawmakers and North Greenville residents got their answer.

A resolution passed by ReWa’s board agreed to nearly every term outlined in that letter.

Those terms include:

Among those in attendance at a recent meeting with ReWa’s CEO Graham Rich was state Rep. Burns, who is now calling the resolution a “win-win” for both community residents and ReWa.

“I will say things developed a little slower than we would have liked,” Burns said, “but we have gotten to what I hope is the resolution of this situation, at least for now.”

That “slower” resolution Burns described was one of the main factors in driving speculation and uncertainty within the community, according to Jimmy Epting, former President of North Greenville University.

“Lack of communication is what got things off on the wrong foot,” Epting said. “What bothered the community so much was ReWa verbally saying, ‘Oh, it’s not our purpose to expand in that area. We just want to serve North Greenville University and Cherokee Valley.’ But they never communicated things formally or clearly along the way, and that left the community to investigate and find out on our own.”

As the president of NGU for nearly 25 years, Epting was part of the deliberations at the school to upgrade its sewer system just before he retired in 2015. One year later, lawmakers expanded ReWa’s service boundaries to include northern Greenville County.

For community residents like Heather Collins, who with her husband, Travis, owns 340 acres of family farmland right beside the land ReWa acquired, the clarity has been long overdue. Now, she just hopes the resolution means those agreements will be formally implemented.

“I really do want to find a nice coexistence with [ReWa],” Collins said. “I understand [northern] Greenville does need a solution, but it doesn’t need to be at the peril of the existing community.”

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