Criminal Defense Attorney inCross Anchor, SC

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CDH Law Firm: Giving Hope to
Criminal Defense Clients in
Cross Anchor, SC

Getting charged with a crime in Cross Anchor can be a traumatic experience. Even "petty" crimes can cause an individual's life to fall apart professionally and personally. Spending time in jail is bad enough, but the ramifications of a criminal record run deep, resulting in loss of employment, loss of friends, and even family. For many people, having a zealous criminal defense attorney in Cross Anchor, SC, to defend their rights is the only shot they have of living a normal life.

That's why, if you have been charged with a crime, you need the help of a veteran criminal defense lawyer early in the legal process. That's where CDH Law Firm comes in to give you or your loved one hope when you need it the most.

Our criminal defense law firm was founded to help people just like you - hardworking men and women who are looking at diminished employment opportunities and a possible lifetime of embarrassment. But with our team of experts fighting by your side, you have a much better chance of maintaining your freedom and living a normal, productive life. When it comes to criminal law in Cross Anchor, we've seen it all. With decades of combined experience, there is no case too complicated or severe for us to handle, from common DUI charges to complicated cases involving juvenile crimes. Unlike some of our competition, we prioritize personalized service and cutting-edge criminal defense strategies to effectively represent our clients.

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Clients rank CHSA Law, LLC as the top choice for Cross Anchor criminal defense because we provide:

  • One-on-One Counsel
  • Education on the Cross Anchor Legal Process and Its Risks
  • Ardent, Effective Representation
  • Commitment to Our Clients and Defending Their Rights
  • Prompt Inquiry Response
  • Robust Experience with Criminal Law Cases in Cross Anchor
  • Innovative Defense Strategies
  • Effective, Thorough Research and Investigation

Choosing the right criminal defense lawyer in Cross Anchor can mean the difference between conviction and acquittal. Our firm has represented thousands of clients in the Lowcountry, and we're ready to defend you too. Some of our specialties include:

 Estate Planning Attorney Cross Anchor, SC
The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

DUI Cases
in Cross Anchor, SC

DUI penalties in Cross Anchor can be very harsh. Many first-time DUI offenders must endure a lifelong criminal record, license suspension, and the possibility of spending time in jail. Officers and judges take DUI very seriously, with 30% of traffic fatalities in South Carolina involving impaired drivers, according to NHTSA. Criminal convictions can have lasting impacts on your life, which is why CDH Law Firm works so hard to get these charges dismissed or negotiated down. In some cases, we help clients avoid jail time altogether.

 Estate Planning Lawyer Cross Anchor, SC
When you hire our DUI defense firm, our team will always work towards your best interests and will go above and beyond to achieve the best outcome in your case. Depending on the circumstances of your DUI charges, we will investigate whether:
  • Your DUI stop was legal
  • You were administered a field sobriety test correctly
  • The breathalyzer used was calibrated correctly and properly maintained
  • Urine and blood tests were administered and collected properly

The bottom line? Our criminal law defense attorneys will do everything possible to keep you out of jail with a clean permanent record. It all starts with a free consultation, where we will take time to explain the DUI process. We'll also discuss your defense options and speak at length about the differences between going to trial and accepting a plea bargain.

DUI Penalties in Cross Anchor, SC

The consequences of a DUI in Cross Anchor depend on a number of factors, including your blood alcohol level and how many DUIs you have received in the last 10 years. If you're convicted, the DUI charge will remain on your criminal history and can be seen by anyone who runs a background check on you. Sometimes, a judge will require you to enter alcohol treatment or install an interlock device on your automobile.

If you're on the fence about hiring a criminal defense lawyer in Cross Anchor, SC, consider the following DUI consequences:

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First Offense

Offense

48 hours to 90 days

in jail

with fines ranging from

$400 to $1,000

Second Offense

Offense

Five days to three years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$2,100 to $6,500

Third Offense

Offense

60 days to five years

in jail

with fines ranging from

$3,800 to $10,000

Additional consequences can include:

1

Alcohol or Drug Treatment

When convicted of DUI in South Carolina, most offenders must join the Alcohol and Drug Safety Action Program. This program mandates that offenders complete a drug and alcohol assessment and follow the recommended treatment options.

 Criminal Defense Attorney Cross Anchor, SC

2

Community Service

Some first-time DUI offenders in Cross Anchor may choose to complete community service in lieu of jail time. Community service hours are usually equal to the length of jail time an offender would be required to serve.

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Sanctions to Your Driver's License

Typically, when a person is convicted of driving under the influence in Cross Anchor, their driver's license is restricted or suspended. The length of restriction or suspension depends on how many prior DUI convictions an individual has.

First DUI Offense

First-time DUI offenders must endure a six-month license suspension. Drivers convicted with a blood-alcohol level of .15% or more do not qualify for a provisional license. However, sometimes they may still drive using an ignition interlock device.

Second DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a second DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for two years.

Third DUI Offense

Offenders convicted of a third DUI charge must use an ignition interlock device (IID) for three years. That term increases to four years if the driver is convicted of three DUIs in five years.

Immobilized Vehicle

For offenders with two or more convictions, the judge will immobilize their vehicle if it is not equipped with an IID. When a judge immobilizes a vehicle, the owner must turn over their registration and license plate. Clearly, the consequences of receiving a DUI in Cross Anchor can be life-changing, and not in a good way. The good news is that with CDH Law Firm, you have a real chance at beating your charges and avoiding serious fines and jail time. Every case is different, which is why it's so important that you call our office as soon as possible if you are charged with a DUI.

Traffic Violation Cases

Most drivers brush off traffic law violations as minor offenses, but the fact of the matter is they are criminal matters to be taken seriously. Despite popular opinion, Traffic Violation cases in Cross Anchor can carry significant consequences like fines and even incarceration. If you or someone you love has been convicted of several traffic offenses, your license could be suspended, restricting your ability to work and feed your family.

Every driver should take Traffic Violations seriously. If you're charged with a traffic crime, it's time to protect yourself and your family with a trusted criminal defense lawyer in Cross Anchor, SC. Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC is ready to provide the legal guidance and advice you need to beat your traffic charges. We'll research the merits of your case, explain what charges you're facing, discuss your defense options, and strategize an effective defense on your behalf.

Common Cross Anchor
Traffic Violations That CDH Law
Firm Fights

There are dozens and dozens of traffic laws in Cross Anchor, all of which affect drivers in some way. Our Cross Anchor defense attorneys fight a full range of violations, including but not limited to the following:

 Law Firm Cross Anchor, SC
  • Driving Under Suspension: If you drive while your license is suspended, revoked, or canceled, you could be looking at 30 days in jail and fines up to $300.
  • Driving Under the Influence: Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated on drugs or alcohol is illegal and often results in jail time and fines.
  • Reckless Driving: You could be ordered to pay up to $200 in fines or jailed for up to 30 days if you drive with wanton disregard for the safety of other people.
  • Racing: You can be cited and fined if you aid or participate in street racing.
  • Hit and Run: When you leave the scene of an accident that involved injury to another party, you can be arrested. This serious charge can lead to up to one year in jail and fines of up to $5,000 for first-time offenders.
  • Disregard Traffic Signals: Drivers must obey all traffic signals and control devices, less they be ticketed and sometimes fined.

As seasoned traffic violation lawyers, we know how frustrating it can be to get charged with a Traffic Violation. While some traffic charges can be minor, others are severe and can affect your life for years to come. Don't leave your fate up to chance call CDH Law Firm today for the highest-quality Traffic Violation representation in Cross Anchor.

Juvenile Crime Cases in
Cross Anchor, SC

At Cobb Dill Hammett, LLC, we understand that children are still growing and learning about the world around them. As such, they may make mistakes that get them into trouble with the law. Children and teens who are arrested in Cross Anchor can face much different futures than other children their age. Some face intensive probation, while others are made to spend time in jail.

This happens most often when a child's parents fail to retain legal counsel for their son or daughter. Cases referred to the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice often move quicker than adult cases, so finding a good lawyer is of utmost importance. With that said, a compassionate criminal defense attorney in Cross Anchor, SC, can educate you and your child about their alleged charges. To help prevent your child from going to a detention center, we will devise a strategy to achieve favorable results in their case.

 Attorney Cross Anchor, SC
 Divorce Lawyer Cross Anchor, SC

Juvenile Detention Hearings

Unlike adults, juveniles don't have a constitutional right to a bond hearing. Instead, once your child is taken into custody a Detention Hearing is conducted within 48 hours. This hearing is similar to a combination of a Bond Hearing and a Preliminary Hearing. Unfortunately, there is little time to prepare for these hearings, which is why you must move quickly and call CDH law firm as soon as possible.

Our team gathers police reports, petitions, interviews your child at the DJJ, speaks with you about the case and talks to the prosecutor to discover if they have plans for detention. In most cases, we strive to avoid detention and seek alternatives like divisionary programs or treatment facilities. This strategy better addresses your child's issues and keeps them out of the juvenile legal system in Cross Anchor. If your child is charged with a crime, and South Carolina decides to prosecute, your child will appear before a family court judge, who will find them delinquent or not delinquent. There are no juries in juvenile cases in South Carolina, which is why it's crucial to have a lawyer present to defend your child if they go in front of a judge.

Common penalties for juveniles charged with crimes in Cross Anchor include:

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  • Probation: Children charged with probation are released to their parents or guardians. Depending on their charges, they must abide by certain stipulations while at home and may be subject to random drug screenings. Violation of probation often results in jail time.
  • 90 Days in Juvenile Detention Center: When probation is not a viable option, prosecutors may push for 90 days of jail time in a juvenile detention facility.
  • Juvenile Detention: Children who commit very serious crimes can be sent to a juvenile detention center for a long time. These sentences can last up to the child's 21st birthday.
  • School Expulsion: When a child is convicted of a crime, their school is notified of the offense. Sometimes, the administration may decide to expel the child from school for the misdemeanors or felonies they commit.

We Fight to Protect
Your Rights So You Can
Provide for Your Family

Whether you are facing a DUI charge or a serious traffic violation, CDH Law Firm is here to fight for your rights so you can continue living life. The future might seem bleak, but our criminal defense lawyers in Cross Anchor, SC, have the tools, experience, and strategy to win your case, as we have with so many others. Don't lose hope call our office today and maintain your freedom tomorrow.

Ask us anything

Call Now 843-936-6680 PH

Latest News in Cross Anchor, SC

Tornado damage, outages reported after severe storms move through western Carolinas

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - Storm damage and power outages were reported Friday night after a line of severe storms moved through Upstate South Carolina and western North Carolina.A tornado warning was issued for parts of the Upstate earlier in the night.A downed tree and powerlines were on a home on Gurley Street in Anderson County. FOX Carolina’s Kennedi Harris spoke with the family who said they are renting the house. The mother and children who live there were at a neighbor’s home with the tree fell so eve...

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - Storm damage and power outages were reported Friday night after a line of severe storms moved through Upstate South Carolina and western North Carolina.

A tornado warning was issued for parts of the Upstate earlier in the night.

A downed tree and powerlines were on a home on Gurley Street in Anderson County. FOX Carolina’s Kennedi Harris spoke with the family who said they are renting the house. The mother and children who live there were at a neighbor’s home with the tree fell so everyone is okay. They are waiting for the Red Cross to arrive and said they have lost most of their belongings.

In Spartanburg County along I-26, multiple trees were downed during the storm. Spartanburg County Emergency Management said eight trees fell near or along the highway. However, they added that no injuries from the falling trees were reported following the storm.

The South Carolina Highway Patrol reported downed trees in the roadway at the following locations:

The Georgia vs. LSU game at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena was delayed due to a leak from the ceiling during the storms caused by excessive high winds.

Duke Energy reported 5,792 customers without power in Buncombe County on Friday night.

As of 11:30 p.m. on Saturday, the power company reported the following counties with customers without power: 51 in Buncombe County, 87 in Haywood County, 25 in Jackson County and 239 in Macon County.

Duke Energy announced on Saturday, that crews are currently working to assess the damage and their line technicians are making good headway with repairs. Officials said the estimated time of restoration is expected to be available once the assessments are complete.

The National Weather Service conducted a storm survey in northern Laurens and southern Spartanburg Counties to determine if the damage was due to straight line winds or tornadoes.

Officials confirmed that a tornado was the cause of EF-1 rated damage in the Gray Court area in Laurens County.

The National Weather Service says “The tornado traveled into downtown Gray Court where sporadic, snapped, and uprooted trees followed a narrow path. It continued to travel through Blackberry Rd and in the vicinity of Highway 92. It then traveled across Ora Rd, while uprooting or snapping at least a dozen trees near a pond on the intersection of Garret Rd and Ora Rd. Numerous trees were uprooted or snapped between MM41 and MM42 on Interstate 26, near Enoree. The tornado finally lifted with a few large limbs down off of Cross Anchor Rd.”

Multiple trees were down in roadways in Cherokee, North Carolina near the Qualla Boundary.

The county was under a Tornado Warning for a portion of Friday evening.

Stay with FOX Carolina for updates on this developing story.

Copyright 2023 WHNS. All rights reserved.

Editor’s notebook: A quiet place

There is one patch of land at Musgrove Mill Golf Club, near the 11th tee, where the woods thin out just enough and golfers can catch sight of cars and trucks whooshing by on South Carolina Highway 56, headed south toward Cross Anchor, or Pauline, or maybe all the way to Spartanburg. Arnold Palmer and Ed Seay designed the course to be rustic, natural, a daylong escape, and wherever those vehicles wind up, the sounds they hurl toward the turf is a surprise after a couple hours of solitude.“This is...

There is one patch of land at Musgrove Mill Golf Club, near the 11th tee, where the woods thin out just enough and golfers can catch sight of cars and trucks whooshing by on South Carolina Highway 56, headed south toward Cross Anchor, or Pauline, or maybe all the way to Spartanburg. Arnold Palmer and Ed Seay designed the course to be rustic, natural, a daylong escape, and wherever those vehicles wind up, the sounds they hurl toward the turf is a surprise after a couple hours of solitude.

“This is the only place you can hear any traffic,” superintendent Will Holroyd says. “It reminds you of what you don’t want to go back to.”

Holroyd is lean and quick, his Bean Boots laced, his face covered in a thick mustache. He knows everything one person can know about these 315 acres because he is the only superintendent in the history of the course. Musgrove Mill opened in Clinton, South Carolina, almost equidistant from Atlanta and Charlotte, in the fall of 1988. Holroyd arrived in 1987.

Generous with his time, he will tell you that the course is rich with dogwoods and cedars, oaks and walnuts, and that the Penncross bentgrass greens are originals. He will tell you that he regularly spots deer, beavers, wild turkeys and wild pigs on the grounds. Occasionally, he might spot a bobcat or a coyote, or a bald eagle. He will tell you that the Enoree River is both his “greatest asset and biggest headache.” He will tell you there are 21 fans dotted around the course — he describes them as “game-changers” for the turf — and that 15 holes need some sort of air movement.

And he will tell you that at least one person — and, most likely, many more than one — has described the place as the “Pine Valley of the South” — a reference to both its rugged beauty and its nearly constant challenge. “We’ve opened it some, softened it,” Holroyd says, “but we’ve never made it easier. It’s a penal course.”

Jeff Tallman, the director of golf since 1996, likes to tell the story about when a member approached him and expressed their wish that the course was just 16 holes. “My score would be a lot better,” Tallman remembers the member saying. “Well, which two holes do you have a problem with?” Tallman asked. “That’s the problem” the member responded. “It changes every time out.”

Holroyd will also tell you about the unique schedule he developed for his maintenance crew. Out of necessity, he splits the team into weekday and weekend staffers. The six full-time crew members and one full-time mechanic work Monday through Friday mornings, with weekends starting at 10 a.m. Fridays. The part-timers work Saturdays and Sundays, free to do whatever they want the rest of the time.

Most of those part-timers are students, which also requires Holroyd to shuffle project schedules around school calendars and holidays. Aerification, for example, is scheduled for every Presidents’ Day. “And if we get washed out that day …” Holroyd says. He trails off, not wanting to consider a late-February downpour. “If I can stay another 35 years,” he says, “I might be able to straighten some of this out.”

Oh, and one other thing Holroyd will tell you. Before he arrived at Musgrove Mill, he worked out of state for a while. Holroyd, the 2017 recipient of the Carolinas GCSA Distinguished Service Award, values the industry infrastructure and support across the region. “Everybody in the Carolinas needs to move, at least for a year, to really appreciate what we have here,” he says. His last stop before landing at Musgrove Mill was at a course over in Tennessee that handled 50,000 rounds per year. “It was like a factory,” he says, “and it just about drove me out of the profession.”

Musgrove Mill is a little quieter, a little more reserved. Well, a little more reserved most of the time: At least two people have instructed family and friends to spread their ashes on the course — and one of them had his remains fired from a cannon.

“It shows the passion people have for this place,” Holroyd says. “I have that passion too.”

Matt LaWell is Golf Course Industry’s managing editor.

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What We Know: Spartanburg County high school graduation schedules and safety procedures

Spartanburg County's Class of 2021 will hold graduation ceremonies over the next few weeks, using similar safety protocols that were held last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic.Though Gov. Henry McMaster issued a mandate earlier this week making face masks optional in South Carolina public schools, some local school districts already had made graduation plans encouraging people to wear face masks.Here's what we know so far:Chapman High SchoolTime and date: 8 p...

Spartanburg County's Class of 2021 will hold graduation ceremonies over the next few weeks, using similar safety protocols that were held last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Though Gov. Henry McMaster issued a mandate earlier this week making face masks optional in South Carolina public schools, some local school districts already had made graduation plans encouraging people to wear face masks.

Here's what we know so far:

Chapman High School

Time and date: 8 p.m. on May 27.

Place: Chapman High football stadium, 1420 Compton Bridge Road in Inman

? What you need to know: Graduates will be given eight guest tickets and four parking passes each. Parking is limited. The ceremony will be live-streamed for anyone who can’t attend.

Graduates and guests will be seated 6 feet apart. Graduates will be provided with masks; guests are encouraged to also wear them. Only graduates and school faculty and staff will be allowed on the field.

Rain dates: May 28 at 8 p.m. OR May 29 at 11:30 a.m.

Landrum High School

Time and date 6 p.m. on May 27.

Place: Landrum High football stadium, 18818 Asheville Hwy. in Campobello

? What you need to know: Each graduate will be given eight guest tickets and four parking passes. Parking is limited. The ceremony will be live-streamed for anyone who can’t attend.

Graduates and guests will be seated 6 feet apart. Graduates will be provided with masks; guests are encouraged to also wear masks. Only graduates and school faculty and staff will be allowed on the field.

Rain dates: May 28 at 6 p.m. OR May 29 at 10 a.m.

Boiling Springs High School

Time and date: 7 p.m. on May 28.

Place: Boiling Springs High School Bulldog Stadium, 2251 Old Furnace Road in Boiling Springs

? What you need to know: Boiling Springs is expecting around 550 graduates, and each graduate will receive five guest tickets. The ceremony will be livestreamed for those who cannot attend.

The livestream link is available: www.youtube.com/c/SpartanburgCountySchoolDistrict2

Safety protocols for the graduation will include mask-wearing, social distancing and marked seating.

Rain date: May 29, time TBD

Chesnee High School

Time and date: 7 p.m. on May 27.

Place: Chesnee High School gymnasium, 795 S. Alabama Ave.in Chesnee

? What you need to know: Chesnee is expecting about 189 graduates, and each graduate will receive four guest tickets. The ceremony will be livestreamed for those who cannot attend.

The livestream link is available: www.youtube.com/c/SpartanburgCountySchoolDistrict2

Safety protocols for the graduation will include mask-wearing, social distancing and marked seating.

Broome High School

Time and date: 8 p.m. May 27.

Place: Broome High football field, 381 Cherry Hill Road in Spartanburg

? What you need to know: Broome is expecting about 200 graduates at the ceremony and each will receive eight guests tickets.

Graduates and guests will be required to social distance, and everyone is encouraged to wear a mask.

Woodruff High School

Time and date: 8 p.m. on May 28

Place: Willie Varner Stadium, 710 Cross Anchor Road in Woodruff

? What you need to know: Graduates will be given six guest tickets each and these tickets will be designated to either the home or visitor side of the stadium. Guests are asked to distance themselves from others.

Don't be late — gates close at 7:45.

Byrnes High School

Time and Date: 7:30 p.m. on May 20.

Place: Nixon Field, 150 E. Main St. in Duncan

? What you need to know: Currently, the school is expecting about 600 graduates at the ceremony and each graduate will receive four guest tickets.

Graduates and all attendees are encouraged to wear masks when entering the stadium until they get to their seats, which will be spaced out.

Dorman High School

Time and date: 8 p.m. on May 27

Place: Cavalier Stadium, 1050 Cavalier Way in Roebuck

? What you need to know: Each graduate will receive four guest tickets, and the ceremony will be livestreamed for anyone who can’t attend in person.

The livestream link is available: https://livestream.com/spartanburg6/dhsgraduation2021

Graduates will receive their tickets at a mandatory graduation practice at 8:30 a.m. on May 27. They will not be able to receive them early.

Spartanburg High School

Time and date: 8 a.m. on May 22

Place: Viking Stadium, 2250 E. Main St. in Spartanburg

? What you need to know: The school is expecting about 400 graduates to attend the ceremony and each will receive six guest tickets.

Guests and graduates are asked to remain socially distanced from others and wear a mask.

Samantha Swann covers Spartanburg County K-12 schools and colleges and the food scene in downtown and beyond. She is a University of South Carolina Upstate and Greenville Technical College alumna. Contact her at JSwann@gannett.com.

Here's how Spartanburg County plans to improve, maintain roads without road fee

Fixing potholes and upgrading many of the county's 1,700 miles of roads and 150 bridges tops the list of goals in a strategic vision plan recently adopted by Spartanburg County Council.The vision plan is non-binding, but is meant to serve as a general roadmap of the council's priorities for the next five years, said County Council Chairman Manning Lynch.The vision plan's top five goals are:? Accelerate the improvement of county roads.? Make strategic use of land to foster quality of...

Fixing potholes and upgrading many of the county's 1,700 miles of roads and 150 bridges tops the list of goals in a strategic vision plan recently adopted by Spartanburg County Council.

The vision plan is non-binding, but is meant to serve as a general roadmap of the council's priorities for the next five years, said County Council Chairman Manning Lynch.

The vision plan's top five goals are:

? Accelerate the improvement of county roads.

? Make strategic use of land to foster quality of life and economic growth.

? Strike a balance between attracting new business and industry, and supporting the growth of small businesses.

? Expand access to affordable housing.

? Champion a vibrant downtown in the city of Spartanburg.

OneSpartanburg's vision planFrom complete trail system to better gateways, what Spartanburg could look like in 2027

It is less detailed than the 331-page comprehensive plan County Council adopted in 2019, which looks at how the county plans to grow over the next serveral decades. That plan is also non-binding. It is also separate from OneSpartanburg's Vision Plan 2.0 that it launched in March.

County Council members noted that much of their plan focuses on creating a healthy business and living environment in and around the city.

With no road fee, Spartanburg County moves forward, revises plan

Last year, Alverson said 45% of county maintained roads and bridges are in poor condition.

"The fact that we're growing tells us we need to change up the way we are approaching our road network," he said. "We need to be more aggressive with that investment, more strategic."

In addition to better publicizing current and pending road improvements, he said more money will be needed. Some on County Council have previously said they would like a new penny sales tax to pay for more road upgrades.

Spartanburg area road projects this yearSpartanburg County 2022 road projects: 2 long-awaited upgrades among many slated to start

This is the first year of county-funded road projects since the $25 road fee was repealed by County Council last September. The fee generated more than $7 million a year for resurfacing.

To replace the $3.95 million in revenues lost , County Council revised the budget by eliminating some county road projects, and deferring others, based on priority.

Alverson said Council's decision to borrow $30 million in 2022 and another $30 million in 2024 for road projects will soften the blow of the road fee repeal.

The borrowing will cost taxpayers an average of $12 more a year in a debt service levy.

The county recently unveiled its road resurfacing program through next year.

The Herald

Improving gateways into downtown Spartanburg

County Administrator Cole Alverson said one key to a vibrant downtown Spartanburg is improving the appearance of the gateways to downtown Spartanburg.

"Some of those leave quite a bit to be desired," he said. "There's a lot of work we can do … to improve people's perception and in doing so we can improve the county at the same time."

Council members Bob Walker and Justin McCorkle, who represent northern and southern Spartanburg County, respectively, said they want to make sure smaller towns in their districts receive attention as well.

Walker said Campobello, Landrum, Inman, Greer and Lyman are all working to improve their central areas.McCorkle's district includes Pacolet and Woodruff and the communities of Pauline, Enoree and Cross Anchor.

"I think there ought to be more opportunity for everybody, thanks to this plan here," McCorkle said.

Councilman David Britt said everyone should benefit if council works toward the goals.

"When we say Spartanburg, we mean everybody, not just the city of Spartanburg," Britt said.

Here is a look at each of the five goals in the vision plan:

Spartanburg County plans to expand zoning

The goal is to "improve the ratio of quality space to newly developed space" by acquiring more land and helping to preserve existing parks and open space for public use. Developers are encouraged to create open space and trails as part of their projects.

In addition, the county plans to expand its zoning that covered southwestern Spartanburg County to other areas in the county. The southwest plan was adopted three years ago with the goal of encouraging more growth along major road arteries while preserving property rights and open spaces in more rural areas.

New leader of SPACENew leader of SPACE: Spartanburg County development causing land encroachment issues

Spartanburg County looks to strike more balance between large and small businesses

Over the years, County Council has awarded tax breaks to hundreds of companies as incentives to locate here. At the same time, some have criticized the council for failing to offer lower tax rates to existing businesses that aren't large enough to qualify for tax breaks.

Alverson said there are 400 companies out of 5,500 businesses in the county with 25 or fewer employees that do business with the county.

The goal is to "create a funding framework to support small business development and foster small business growth."

Expand affordable housing in Spartanburg County

The goal is to "increase the availability of housing units that are affordable." To do that, Alverson said the county should "establish baseline data that defines the need and makes the case for a common agenda," as well as "leverage and support development partnerships to reduce demand gap."

The latest SC Housing Needs Report of census data from 2015 to 2019 shows 22.9% of households in Spartanburg County are "severely" rent-burdened. There were 7,837 households having to spend over 50% of their monthly income on rent. Also, there were 16,682 low-income renter households living in unsubsidized housing in the county.

According to Kelley Ezell at the Upstate Family Resource Center, one's rent shouldn't exceed 30% of their income.

Ready to buy in Spartanburg County?What to know about the housing market, mortgage rates

Champion a vibrant downtown Spartanburg

Downtown Spartanburg has seen continued growth this year with the emergence of more apartments, townhomes, restaurants and other businesses.

"This is really a town that supports the people who live here. This is a place to come to eat, have fun to be with your family, to be entertained," said Katherine O'Neill, chief economic development officer for OneSpartanburg, Inc. "As we recruit more companies out in the county, more have told us how much downtown Spartanburg has factored in their decision."

Alverson said the county should "use economic development tools to attract both business and residents to downtown, improve the aesthetics to the gateways to downtown," work with the city in the site selection and design of the joint city-county government complex, and sell county-owned properties downtown such as the current administration building, the detention center annex and the county employee health clinic "in support of affordable housing, small business and quality space."

Contact Bob Montgomery at bob.montgomery@shj.com. Please support our coverage of Spartanburg County with a digital subscription.

Cross football looking forward to full season

An opportunity to play a full schedule in 2022 has the Cross High football team excited about the potential for success this fall.Due to the lingering COVID-19 virus, Cross was limited to only five games in 2021. The Trojans did not play their first game until Sept. 24 while most teams had already played four games. The Trojans managed just two wins last season, but head coach Shaun Wright sees plenty of potential for more success this season.“First off, getting to play a full 10-game schedule is exciting,” said Wri...

An opportunity to play a full schedule in 2022 has the Cross High football team excited about the potential for success this fall.

Due to the lingering COVID-19 virus, Cross was limited to only five games in 2021. The Trojans did not play their first game until Sept. 24 while most teams had already played four games. The Trojans managed just two wins last season, but head coach Shaun Wright sees plenty of potential for more success this season.

“First off, getting to play a full 10-game schedule is exciting,” said Wright, who took over the program as head coach in 2009. “Knock on wood, hopefully everything will be more normal and our kids will have an opportunity to compete. I feel really good about this team. I am encouraged by what I have seen in the preseason, their work ethic and their attitude. Hopefully all of the excitement and work will translate into more wins.”

Even with the shortened season, the 2021 Trojans were pretty competitive overall. Two of the losses last season, to Baptist Hill and St. John’s, were by a total of five points. And Wright has a solid returning core returning from that team.

“Experience, especially along the front, is probably our strength,” the coach said. “The guys up front will carry us. When you are good up front on both sides of the ball you have a chance to be successful.”

Anchoring the offensive and defensive lines is senior Amonte McCray, a three-sport athlete and the veteran of the unit. Joining him on the offensive line are Jayden Middleton, Ty Bryant, Caleb Cornell and Jayden Smith.

McCray and Middleton also are regulars along the defensive front, joined by Devaughn Sutter and Jacob Sanford.

Several players are sharing the work at linebacker. Seniors include Damion Haines, Santory Jones, Jalen Simmons, and Kriston Moore, along with sophomore Karmello Jones. Working in the secondary are Jamez Way and Jaivon Jefferson at corner, and Preston Fuller and Cayden Ramsey at safety.

As is often the case at the small school level, several players also play integral roles offensively. Way, Jefferson and Fuller are among the top pass-catchers, while Santory Jones and junior Carmello Montgomery are the primary running backs.

Junior Tyler Mungin secured the starting nod at quarterback after a solid preseason. Jerome Thomas, also a junior, will start the season as the backup but Wright feels each can lead the offense effectively.

Cross will open the 2022 season against one of the top teams in Class A, Calhoun County, which played for the Class A Upper State championship last season.

While expectations are high for his own team, Wright feels defending region champion Baptist Hill is the team to beat in a revamped region 8-A. Whale Branch has moved to another region, leaving Military Magnet and St. John’s to battle it out in the four-team league.

“We’re ready to roll,” the coach said. “Still a lot of work to be done but we are making progress. We feel good about our chances.”

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