Divorce Attorney in Tigerville SC

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If there were one universal truth it would be that every family is different. We all have our own set of challenges to face and changes to go through. Sometimes those changes are happy like when a new baby is born. Other times these changes involve uncertainty and loss like in the event of a divorce.

If you are having to go through the pain of divorce deal with a complicated custody issue or are handling a different family-related legal matter you might need help. At CHSA Law LLC we understand that family issues are hard. Many of the family law clients that we work for have big questions about the future leaving them over-stressed and full of worry. They are concerned about their children their marriage or both. They are wrestling with uncertainty and anxiety having been served confusing documents that don't make sense. Sound familiar? A family law attorney in Tigerville, SC can help whether you need a level-headed moderator or a trusted advocate in the courtroom.

At CHSA Law LLC we have decades of combined experience serving the needs of families from divorce proceedings to family formation issues. Our team is fiercely committed to our clients and with a dedicated focus stays up-to-date on the nuanced world of family law in Tigerville. If you're looking for personal attention unbiased representation and a responsive family law attorney look no further than our law firm.

Divorce Attorney Tigerville, SC

If you're unsure of whether you need a family law lawyers in Tigerville" ask yourself these questions:

  • Are you getting married?
  • Are you thinking about divorce?
  • Has your spouse served you with legal papers?
  • Are your kids not receiving the support that they are entitled to?

If you answered yes to any of the questions above know that we are here to help you figure out your next steps. With CDH Law Firm by your side you can have the confidence to face even the most difficult family law issues. All of our attorneys have years of experience are incredibly responsive and fight for your family's rights. We are happy to take as much time as you need to answer questions and help put your mind at ease for whatever lies ahead.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC

Our firm specializes in a wide range of family law cases including:

  • Divorce
  • Child Custody
  • Alimony
  • Adoptions
  • Child Support
  • Mediation
  • Property Division
  • More

If you have been left to manage a foreign family law situation it's time to call CHSA Law LLC. We will sit down with you for an hour at absolutely no cost - because we understand what you're going through and know that you need answers not another bill to pay.

To help provide you with a basic understanding of family law keep reading for in-depth explanations on our areas of expertise.

The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference

Divorce lawyer in
Tigerville SC.

At CHSA Law LLC we know all-too-well that a one size fits all approach isn't going to work very well for your unique situation. That's why we approach each divorce case from a personalized standpoint - something that we feel like each of our clients deserves.

 Attorney Tigerville, SC
Our goal is to help solve your family law issues and focus on your needs when your divorce is finalized. We will help develop a strategy for:
  • Meeting your post-divorce needs and objectives
  • Dividing marital property for maximum benefit
  • Maximizing time spent with your child as part of your divorce's parenting plan
  • Strengthen your role as a decision-maker for your child
  • Navigating your divorce proceedings and minimizing financial and emotional costs

By working together our divorce law firm will help you rebuild your life and secure a better future for your family.

Divorces in South Carolina
- Different Than Other States

Unlike divorce law in other states South Carolina divorce law doesn't allow spouses to receive an instant no-fault divorce. One or both spouses in the marriage must establish a legally acceptable reason for a divorce to happen. Grounds for a divorce in Tigerville, SC include:

  • Desertion
  • Physical Cruelty
  • Habitual Drunkenness
  • Separation for One Year or More
  • Adultery
 Divorce Lawyer Tigerville, SC

If you or your spouse do not have the necessary grounds for divorce in Tigerville our family law firm can file a Separate Maintenance and Support action. This step lets the court order child custody alimony and marital bills until you can file for your divorce. During this period CHSA Law LLC gathers pertinent info on your spouse's character and assets that can strengthen your case should it be necessary.

Common Issues Associated
with Divorces in Tigerville

A divorce in Tigerville means more than the end of a marriage. It involves dividing the parties debts and assets determines child support and custody parameters and can establish alimony. At CHSA Law LLC many of our clients are able to reach agreements with their spouse to resolve these issues. Reaching an agreement lets both parties customize the terms of their divorce to conserve resources avoid trial and meet the family's needs.

Sometimes however two spouses cannot or will not come to terms with an agreement. In these situations a trial is possible and litigation is necessary. Our family law attorneys in Tigerville, SC. are highly experienced litigators and are well-equipped to handle any disputes revealed in the conference or courtroom.

Common divorce issues include:

Divorce Attorney Tigerville, SC
1.

Child Custody and Visitation

One of the most heart-wrenching difficult decisions for parents going through a divorce is resolving child custody and visitation issues. Child custody refers to how much time each parent will spend with their child and whether they can make decisions for them. According to South Carolina law child custody and visitation time are based on what is best for the child.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC
2.

Child Support

Like other U.S states a formula is used in South Carolina to determine how much child support a person must pay. This formula recommends the amount of child support based on factors like how much income the parents make the cost of childcare and the obligation to support children from other relationships.

 Attorney Tigerville, SC
3.

Alimony

In South Carolina there is no formula to determine how much alimony a person must pay. However courts consider several factors when deciding if alimony is needed how much alimony should be paid and how long a spouse must pay it. Those factors include each spouse's ability and need to pay alimony how long the marriage lasted and any marital misconduct that occurred. To make matters more confusing there are different alimony types including lump sum rehabilitative and reimbursement.

 Divorce Lawyer Tigerville, SC
4.

Distribution of Property

In South Carolina marital property is the property that each spouse amasses from the date of the wedding to the time a spouse files for divorce. That property can often include marital debt. In a South Carolina divorce the courts will order an equitable division of property meaning fair under all circumstances but not necessarily equal.

Divorce Attorney Tigerville, SC

Understanding Child Custody in Tigerville, SC.

As mentioned above decisions that involve child custody and visitation can be contentious for parents both emotionally and legally. As experienced empathetic divorce lawyers we understand how difficult this process can be. When we work with clients going through child custody battles we always make it a point to be with them through the ups and downs to help them stay centered. Whether you are the husband or wife in your divorce we share a common goal: finding an effective way to support your children and assure their wellbeing.

In South Carolina child custody is a loaded term. In the most general definition child custody determines when each parent is responsible for the physical care of the child and how much authority each parent has to make decisions in their child's life.

No two child custody cases are the same but a negotiated custody arrangement is usually preferred in the judge's eyes as each parent has input in the process. If the parents cannot come to an amicable resolution their fate is left in the hands of a Family Court Judge in South Carolina. The focus of child custody law is always on what is in the best interests of the child. What the judge determines to be the best interests changes depending on the judge.

There are different variations of custody in South Carolina (or custody arrangements) each with varying degrees of authority. When you consult with our family law attorneys at CHSA Law LLC we will go over the child custody process in detail and touch on each distinction to eliminate any confusion you have.

  • Help develop cooperative solutions to disputes or mediate when needed
  • Create an equitable parenting plan
  • Discuss the implications of the different forms of joint and sole custody
  • Problems related to child support
  • Modify court orders if you or your child's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of visitation and custody agreements
  • Much more
Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry. <

Many of the family law clients that walk into our office have big questions that are leaving them full of stress and worry.

 Law Firm Tigerville, SC

Understanding Child Support
in Tigerville, SC.

When children are involved in divorce cases child support is often ordered. Several factors can impact whether child support is ordered like the income-earning potential of the child's parents any custody arrangements that are created and what needs the child may have.

At CHSA Law LLC we have years of experience with child support issues relating to:

  • Cases where child support is needed for stay-at-home parents
  • Modifications and enforcement of child support mandates
  • Resolving support and custody disputes
  • Mediation arrangements to reach an agreement on child support. Compared to litigation going
  • the mediated route often means less stress and is more cost-effective than trial.

When you trust our family law firm in Tigerville for representation we can help calculate an estimate of how much child support you or your spouse may be ordered to pay. We can also perform a needs-based analysis in cases that involve large amounts of income. At the end of the day our goal is to make this frustrating process as stress-free as possible for you so that you can focus on living life and caring for your child.

Understanding Alimony in
Tigerville, SC.

Alimony (sometimes called spousal support or maintenance) is ordered by the court or negotiated between parties. This kind of spousal support has many factors like the income of both spouses how long they were married and the age of each spouse. Like child custody and child support trusted legal guidance is strongly recommended if you are facing potential alimony payments. Our family law attorneys will help you reach amicable arrangements for fair and appropriate alimony payments.

At CHSA Law LLC your family law attorney in Tigerville, SC will help protect your interests and rights regarding:

 Attorney Tigerville, SC
  • Alimony and business assets
  • Permanent or long-term alimony
  • Significant alimony in high-asset divorces
  • Modifications to alimony arrangements when you or your spouse's circumstances change
  • Enforcement of spousal support mandates when needed

Understanding Division of
Property in Tigerville, SC.

When there are no children marital property or issues of alimony divorces often proceed smoothly between amicable spouses. However most divorces in South Carolina are much more complex. Typically divorce involves a union between spouses that lasts for years and involves substantial marital property. This property can be personal property real estate family businesses debts out-of-state property debts bank accounts and more.

In these nuanced situations the applicable parties need assistance dividing their property. This help most often comes from seasoned family law attorneys like CHSA Law LLC.

When it comes to distribution of property certain types of properties that are controversial even under the property division rules in South Carolina. South Carolina is an equitable distribution state meaning that marital property is divided equitably but not always equally.

If you are going through a divorce it's important that you are aware of the following assets and the common issues their division presents:

 Divorce Lawyer Tigerville, SC
Pensions

Pensions:

Generally pensions are the second-largest asset in a marriage. When there are sufficient alternative income sources to compensate the non-pension holder South Carolina divorce courts may leave the pension rights with the spouse who earned it with future distribution available. Otherwise a divorce court may enter a Qualified Domestic Relations Order requiring the pension administrator to pay both the former spouse and worker.

Family Home

Family Home:

The family home or the primary residential property owned by the divorcing couple is usually considered a marriage's biggest asset. Dividing this kind of property can be complex and frustrating especially when there are kids involved.

Many divorcing couples have a hard time reaching an agreement on property division. Because the division of property depends on the complexity of you or your spouse's assets and liabilities it is crucial to consult with an experienced family law attorney to provide guidance.

Latest News in Tigerville, SC

As tensions simmer, ReWa resolves to limit expansion into Northern Greenville County

Fred Kissling has lived in the rural, northern Greenville County community of Tigerville for more than 40 years.In a county that has seen drastic changes and development during that time, Tigerville’s quiet, agrarian lifestyle has been a form of solace for him and others in the community.But in the past few years, a simmering tension has been building between local residents and Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the primary wastewater treatment service provider in Greenville County....

Fred Kissling has lived in the rural, northern Greenville County community of Tigerville for more than 40 years.

In a county that has seen drastic changes and development during that time, Tigerville’s quiet, agrarian lifestyle has been a form of solace for him and others in the community.

But in the past few years, a simmering tension has been building between local residents and Renewable Water Resources (ReWa), the primary wastewater treatment service provider in Greenville County.

The conflict began when ReWa purchased about 75 acres of land off Highway 414, including 50 acres acquired in 2020 through eminent domain.

“Lack of communication is what got things off on the wrong foot. [ReWa] never communicated things formally or clearly along the way, and that left the community to investigate and find out on our own.” -Jimmy Epting, former president, North Greenville University

ReWa promised that its goal was to build a new facility that would only serve to meet the needs of North Greenville University and a subdivision known as Cherokee Valley. The new facility, ReWa stated, would “not be designed to accommodate future growth in the area,” according to Chad Lawson, ReWa’s Director of Communications.

But residents like Kissling argued a new facility would only need a small fraction of that acreage, and questions arose as to whether the new treatment facility would be the first step in developing the area and destroying the rural beauty Kissling and others have come to love.

“It’s a problem, because what I would say is the overwhelming community desire is to just leave this place alone,” Kissling said. “But boy, sometimes it seems that is not well-understood.”

Lawmakers heard those concerns, and this past February, a group that included state Senator Tom Corbin, state Representative Mike Burns, County Councilman Joe Dill and members of the Tigerville Executive Community Committee sent a letter to ReWa asking for clarity on the true purpose of the treatment facility. The letter also asked for assurances that ReWa would meet the community’s “terms of agreement for coexistence.”

On Monday, April 19, lawmakers and North Greenville residents got their answer.

A resolution passed by ReWa’s board agreed to nearly every term outlined in that letter.

Those terms include:

Among those in attendance at a recent meeting with ReWa’s CEO Graham Rich was state Rep. Burns, who is now calling the resolution a “win-win” for both community residents and ReWa.

“I will say things developed a little slower than we would have liked,” Burns said, “but we have gotten to what I hope is the resolution of this situation, at least for now.”

That “slower” resolution Burns described was one of the main factors in driving speculation and uncertainty within the community, according to Jimmy Epting, former President of North Greenville University.

“Lack of communication is what got things off on the wrong foot,” Epting said. “What bothered the community so much was ReWa verbally saying, ‘Oh, it’s not our purpose to expand in that area. We just want to serve North Greenville University and Cherokee Valley.’ But they never communicated things formally or clearly along the way, and that left the community to investigate and find out on our own.”

As the president of NGU for nearly 25 years, Epting was part of the deliberations at the school to upgrade its sewer system just before he retired in 2015. One year later, lawmakers expanded ReWa’s service boundaries to include northern Greenville County.

For community residents like Heather Collins, who with her husband, Travis, owns 340 acres of family farmland right beside the land ReWa acquired, the clarity has been long overdue. Now, she just hopes the resolution means those agreements will be formally implemented.

“I really do want to find a nice coexistence with [ReWa],” Collins said. “I understand [northern] Greenville does need a solution, but it doesn’t need to be at the peril of the existing community.”

Historic Tigerville General Store renamed Wood's General Store

North Greenville University renamed the historic Tigerville General Store to Wood's General Store at a dedication ceremony. Left to right: Helen Wood, Willie Wood, Bobby Wood, and Laura Messer Wood.A 168-year-old part of the Tigerville community was renamed, honoring its historic role in the Greenville County community which is home to North Greenville University’s main campus.NGU’s remodeled campus store on the north edge of the campus is now Wood's General Store, celebrating the Wood family's ties to the building ...

North Greenville University renamed the historic Tigerville General Store to Wood's General Store at a dedication ceremony. Left to right: Helen Wood, Willie Wood, Bobby Wood, and Laura Messer Wood.

A 168-year-old part of the Tigerville community was renamed, honoring its historic role in the Greenville County community which is home to North Greenville University’s main campus.

NGU’s remodeled campus store on the north edge of the campus is now Wood's General Store, celebrating the Wood family's ties to the building which became a community hub when it was built by Tigerville pioneer B.F. Neves in 1864.

The building at 7850 North Tigerville Road, which NGU purchased from Willie Wood in 2007, was restored and reopened in 2012 as Tigerville General Store. This summer, the building was remodeled to accommodate the new campus store and serve as the NGU post office facility. Open from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, the store carries a variety of NGU-branded items, as well as school supplies and snack items. University officials saw the opportunity to restore the Wood name as part of the repurposing.

"If you forget your history, you are giving up precious jewels," said NGU President Dr. Gene C. Fant, Jr., at an Aug. 11 ceremony to celebrate the new name. "For over 150 years ... this is the place where people would come, would intersect, and would have conversations. It's really community.

"That’' one of the things we learned in the pandemic. We need community and we need connections with other people," said Fant. "Places like this really are integral to the community. That's been the value of stores like this in American life."

The store was originally called Ben Neves General Store. The Wood family connection began in 1914 as John T. Wood became Tigerville's postmaster, and also operated the store for Neves. Wood’' son, T. Pralo Wood, purchased the store in the 1940s, following Neves' death. Wood's son, Willie, bought the store from his father in 1988 and continued operating it until the mid-1990s. He sold it to North Greenville in 2007.

Willie Wood and his three siblings, Bobby Wood, Helen Wood, and Laura Wood Messer attended the Aug.,11 event. Laura Wood Messer, a 1967 North Greenville graduate, shared remarks on behalf of the family. She noted that their mother, Helen R. Wood, followed John T. Wood as postmaster, serving in that role for nearly 47 years.

“We would like to thank North Greenville University for reconnecting the Wood name to this store," Messer said. "You have refurbished and strengthened its 168-year-old walls and prepared it for another century of historical significance to the Tigerville community. And for that we are very grateful."

Noting the university’s need to address shifting needs of students related to textbook purchases and mail services, Fant said NGU "realized we had the opportunity to consolidate that here and make this once again a consolidated crossroads."

Messer said Neves constructed the building "with wooden pegs holding most of the timbers together. That was 29 years before North Greenville high school/junior college/university even came into existence.

"Mr. Neves was a great friend and supporter of education. He helped North Greenville survive in the early years after its founding in 1892," Messer said. "Mr. Neves donated the original 10 acres of land for the school and $500 to help in its establishment. For many years he somehow always found the cash to help keep the school's doors open."

Diane Jackson, Principal Tigerville Elementary School Taylors, SC

When Diane Jackson became Principal of Tigerville Elementary School in 2011, she ignited a powerful impetus for change and reform that the school had never experienced before. One of the first things she did was to share the school’s and students’ ranking and performance scores with staff and create a sense of urgency that the school had to improve its ex...

When Diane Jackson became Principal of Tigerville Elementary School in 2011, she ignited a powerful impetus for change and reform that the school had never experienced before. One of the first things she did was to share the school’s and students’ ranking and performance scores with staff and create a sense of urgency that the school had to improve its expectations and performance with no excuses. Principal Jackson developed a unique and innovated vision, set a goal to become one of the highest performing schools in the state, and formed a strong leadership team of teachers, the media specialist, and support staff. Student failure was not an option and, to that end, Principal Jackson established high expectations for every child and staff member.

Principal Jackson exemplifies a student-centered, goal-oriented, and data driven approach to improvement. The concepts of differentiation and responding to every students’ unique needs guide Tigerville’ s instructional practices, educational planning, and allocation of resources. As a former teacher and instructional coach, she has a firm grasp of instructional and pedagogical best practices and models these with teachers and students in small reading groups.

As Principal Jackson said recently, “We have an ‘all-in’ philosophy.” Every adult in the building understands and has internalized Principal Jackson’s high expectations. They are committed to doing whatever it takes to ensure student success.

One example of Principal Jackson’s focus on meeting the needs and maximizing the potential of every student is the “needs board” in the data room. The needs board is broken down by grade level and by content area within each grade level. The board contains the name of each student who is struggling in math, English language arts, science, social studies, behavior, or social skills. The list is fluid and is updated each Tuesday at grade level meetings with teachers and administrators. As students’ names appear on the board, measurable evidence-based interventions begin. The board also includes the names of high-performing students who require more challenging academic content. In addition to being beneficial to general education teachers and administrators, the related arts staff, resource teacher, school psychologist, speech therapist, and interventionists also use the board to help guide decisions, interventions, and collaborate with the staff. In addition to school-wide small group interventions, all students in grades three through five receive small group instruction with their classroom teacher and another staff member. Principal Jackson used the district’s flex funding allocation to hire an additional certified teacher and an instructional specialist to work in small groups and individually with students at all grade levels throughout the school day. As a result, the school is better able to meet the needs of all students, including high- and low-performing students through differentiated instruction.

Principal Jackson has successfully engaged the residents of a nearby residential community in a school/community partnership. This partnership was an integral component of Tigerville’s transformation. The residents, mainly retirees, support Tigerville educationally and financially. Principal Jackson arranged for training of the residents as weekly tutors and mentors using the school’s curriculum and instructional materials specific to each students’ needs and achievement levels. Through the residents’ support, Tigerville created a Smart Table lab so every student has access to devices. The residents also have purchased jackets, shoes, food, and Christmas presents for students in need.

When asked to describe herself as a leader, Principal Diane Jackson would use terms such as, honest, direct, fair, consistent, learner, and visionary. These words are traits that guide all her decisions and interactions whether communicating with students, faculty, parents, or community stakeholders.

Since 2011, under Principal Jackson’s leadership, Tigerville has undergone a sea change in school culture with lasting impacts on both student success and community perception.

ReWa passes resolution with conditions for Tigerville plant

Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) approved a resolution stating the conditions that it will construct and operate a treatment facility in Tigerville.The resolution, approved by its board Monday, comes after Tigerville residents asked ReWa's executive officers to sign off on a list of stipulations under which the c...

Renewable Water Resources (ReWa) approved a resolution stating the conditions that it will construct and operate a treatment facility in Tigerville.

The resolution, approved by its board Monday, comes after Tigerville residents asked ReWa's executive officers to sign off on a list of stipulations under which the community is willing to co-exist with the treatment facility.

ReWa purchased property off State 414 and has said it plans to build a new treatment facility to replace the outdated one that serves North Greenville University and the Cherokee Valley neighborhood.

ReWa owns the facility that currently serves NGU and Cherokee Valley. The site of its new facility abuts the university athletic fields and Famoda, a historic angus cattle farm.

Residents in Tigerville, a rural nonincorporated area of northern Greenville County, have said they don't want the sewer option in the community, fearing it will spur sprawl and add more rooftops.

ReWa's resolution addresses some of the stipulations under which residents said they would co-exist with the new plant.

Travis Collins, a member of the Tigerville Community Executive Committee who also co-operates Famoda Farm with his wife, Heather, said the resolution does sound encouraging in that ReWa is trying to at least listen to the community to save the Upstate as far as the small town, rural community.

"That's what we're hoping to do," he said.

Still, he said, the community has yet to see a response from ReWa to the community or the committee.

Heather Collins said the resolution is definitely a step in the right direction.

"Hopefully we have been heard," she said. "What the community wants is not to be impacted by a sewer treatment plant. We understand that there is need to North Greenville and Cherokee Valley and we're happy to accommodate our neighbor. But we are not opening the flood gates. By (ReWa) coming to the table to acknowledge that and work with us on it, I'm very, very pleased with that."

More:Residents want Renewable Water Resources to agree to conditions to co-exist in Tigerville

Conditions in ReWa's resolution:

Stipulations requested by residents:

From prison to doctorate degree: Upstate man shares story of redemption ahead of commencement

TIGERVILLE, S.C. —Cary Sanders may have seemed like an unlikely candidate for a doctoral degree nearly a decade ago. Let alone from a school he was once not welcomed at, North Greenville University."We are here in Tigerville and I used to terrorize this town,” Sanders said. "By the age of 17, I had been arrested 17 different times, and I was really worthless to myself and to the community. One time, I had a lifetime trespassing ban from here for vandalism and stealing. I ended up with a ni...

TIGERVILLE, S.C. —

Cary Sanders may have seemed like an unlikely candidate for a doctoral degree nearly a decade ago. Let alone from a school he was once not welcomed at, North Greenville University.

"We are here in Tigerville and I used to terrorize this town,” Sanders said. "By the age of 17, I had been arrested 17 different times, and I was really worthless to myself and to the community. One time, I had a lifetime trespassing ban from here for vandalism and stealing. I ended up with a nine-year prison sentence for armed robbery. I thought my life was over.”

After his release in November 2013, Sanders said what ultimately changed his life was being given a second chance, and those around him that believed he was worth investing in.

"For nine years now, I’ve been in higher education since my release from prison," Sanders said. "Now, I’m a homeowner. I’m married, I have two children and I’m a productive member of the community."

During his nine-year sentence, Sanders only obtained his GED.

In 2018, he finally earned a master's degree in management from Western Governor's University.

In 2019, Sanders' ban was lifted following an application for a scholarship to the University of North Greenville. Sanders was among the first two people to receive a full scholarship for NGU's doctoral program. The scholarship was given by the late Walt Brashier.

NGU President Gene Fant said the university has seen some remarkable stories, but this one echoes the idea that redemption can be found through education.

"No matter where you are, no matter where you come from, there is hope and change is possible,” Fant said.

NGU Graduate School Associate Provost and Dean, Larry McDonald, said education is also a reflection of hope and NGU is a place where second chances are given.

“I want to say that we live in a society that when people make mistakes, when they mess up, they feel like their life is over," McDonald said. "They’re hopeless, they don’t feel like there’s a path to do anything significant, but Cary’s story is one that there is hope.”

Sanders received a doctorate of ministry, and he said he wants to use it to continue to be a blessing to others through JumpStart and other endeavors. Sanders said for all of the men and women currently locked up, change can happen when opportunities are taken advantage of.

"I’m hoping those watching this tonight will see that they too can have a future greater than their past," Sanders said. "If they will make the most of the opportunities they have right now and just step into them.”

Sanders said he also hopes communities will continue to provide transformational opportunities to formerly incarcerated individuals, because he said that can be the difference between productive members of society versus those who return to jail.

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