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South Carolina Divorce 101

Divorce is a difficult decision for anyone, whether it's you or your partner who initiates it. It's a painful experience that can leave you feeling shattered and alone in the dark. When you made your wedding vows, you did so with the intention of being together for life. You invested a lot of time and money into your wedding, inviting friends and family from all over South Carolina to share in your joy.

Now, you're faced with the harsh reality that you and your former spouse are no longer together. As your family law attorney in Jonesville, SC, we understand how overwhelming this can be. We've assisted many clients through the divorce process and had the knowledge and tools to help them work through it and move on to greener pastures.

The CDH Law Firm Approach to Child Custody in South Carolina

Did you know that the U.S. Census Bureau states that 25% of children younger than 21 live with just one parent while the other parent resides elsewhere in the country? In such circumstances, many families must navigate the complicated and legally complex process of child custody. As seasoned family law attorneys, we have represented clients in all aspects and legal stages of child custody and support.

We focus in providing services for a range of issues, including but not limited to:

  • Drafting Reasonable Proposed Parenting Plans
  • Preparing Child Support Calculations
  • Communication with a Guardian ad Litem (if applicable)
  • Securing De Facto Custodian / Psychological Parent Rights
  • Negotiating Agreements Relating to Child Custody
  • Prosecuting Claims Related to Domestic Violence
  • Prosecuting and Defending Claims for
  • Adoption,
  • Termination of Parental Rights
  • Custody, and
  • Visitation
  • Defending Claims Alleging Abuse / Neglect by the Department of Social Services

Every family has its own distinct characteristics, and as such, child-related agreements must also be customized to fit each unique situation. In South Carolina, our team of skilled family law attorneys takes the time to understand our clients' individual goals and needs and tailor our services accordingly.

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South Carolina Alimony 101

When you get married, you go into the partnership believing that you'll be together forever. It makes sense, then, that most divorcing couples don't know very much about alimony in South Carolina (also referred to as spousal support). They ask questions such as:

  • Who gets alimony?
  • What is a reasonable amount of alimony?

Fortunately, working with a family law lawyer in Jonesville, SC, can answer those questions and make alimony easier to understand and approach.

 Family Support Attorney Jonesville, SC
Family Law Attorney Jonesville, SC

What is Alimony in South Carolina?

Many individuals often mistake alimony for child support, but they are, in fact, two distinct forms of financial obligation and not mutually exclusive. Alimony was established to safeguard a supported spouse in the event of a divorce or separation. For example, a spouse who did not work during the course of the marriage would generally have a stronger alimony claim than a spouse who worked throughout the marriage. Likewise, a spouse who worked throughout the marriage but made less than the other spouse would have a stronger alimony claim than a spouse who worked and earned equivalent income to the supporting spouse.

In many cases, a spouse may choose to stay at home to tend to the children and manage the household. Oftentimes, the spouse who remains at home has sacrificed their career or education to care for the family. In such instances, a divorce could leave the financially weaker spouse in a state of financial turmoil. Without that support system, they will have to start over from scratch. These are some factors the Court will consider in evaluating an appropriate alimony case. Throughout your marriage, you have structured your quality of life based on a budget determined by your finances. While all expenses are shared by both partners, what happens if you have been financially dependent on your spouse and need to support yourself?

At Cobb, Dill, & Hammett, LLC, we aim to assist you in securing the alimony you need to support both yourself and your children. At the same time, we want to ensure that you are not overpaying your spouse, if you are the one required to pay. You may be required to pay an amount that could leave you in a difficult financial situation. Regardless, it's crucial to have the right legal representation to guide you through the alimony process in South Carolina.

The CDH Law Firm Approach to Alimonyin South Carolina

Some people may assume financial responsibilities to a former partner are end with the filing of a divorce decree. However, if the court has mandated alimony payments, then the financial obligations survive. Failure to meet those obligations can lead to serious legal and financial consequences. Family law attorneys at CHSA Law, LLC have years of experience representing clients throughout the divorce process, including alimony determinations.

Our legal services cover many aspects of alimony law, such as:

  • Negotiating Temporary and Final Alimony Payments
  • Modifying Alimony
  • Providing Advice on Reasonable Alimony
  • Filing to Collect Unpaid Alimony

Though our family law attorneys are fearless negotiators and litigators, we always strive to keep your legal proceedings as seamless and straightforward as possible. Our goal is to help reach an agreement on alimony that is reasonable for both you and your spouse. However, compromises aren't always possible. If needed, our lawyers will fight aggressively on your behalf to help ensure your financial rights are protected.

 Law Firm Jonesville, SC

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Law is complicate matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

Trust the Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Difference

Dealing with family law cases can be incredibly trying, particularly when it comes to matters of separation or divorce. As your family law attorney in Jonesville, SC, we recognize the challenges you're facing. With that in mind, know that we're committed to offering empathetic legal counsel on your behalf, no matter how contentious or confusing your situation may become. Contact our law offices today for your initial family law consultation.

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Latest News in Jonesville, SC

Divided decision produces united Union County school

zach.fox@shj.comThe anger in Jonesville and Lockhart over the loss of their high schools has faded with time, but the sense of loss still lingers.“Friday night football was the main event up there,” Lockhart business owner Bernice Canupp said.Games were major social gatherings, with residents in both towns coming out to cheer on the Wildcats and Red Devils. School events were supported by the whole community.But that ended 10 years ago, when the high schools in Jonesville and Lockhart we...

zach.fox@shj.com

The anger in Jonesville and Lockhart over the loss of their high schools has faded with time, but the sense of loss still lingers.

“Friday night football was the main event up there,” Lockhart business owner Bernice Canupp said.

Games were major social gatherings, with residents in both towns coming out to cheer on the Wildcats and Red Devils. School events were supported by the whole community.

But that ended 10 years ago, when the high schools in Jonesville and Lockhart were combined with Union High School to form Union County High.

The decision to consolidate was a divisive one. Many residents of the two communities argued the move would hurt their towns and rob them of a piece of their identity.

The two high schools were estimated to need somewhere in the range of $13 million in repairs. Consolidating the three high schools would save about $1 million annually, the Union County School District estimated.

In the end, economics prevailed, and most residents came to accept the change. But many still miss the institutions that helped bring everyone together.

'A tough decision'

The vote came in March 2007.

“It goes without saying that there was a feeling of loss in the Jonesville community as well as the Lockhart community. Those schools were an important part of the fabric of Union County,” said David Eubanks, who served as Union County's interim superintendent about a month after the vote. “It was a tough decision and it was an emotional decision.”

Consolidation came down to money, he said. Renovating the two high schools would have been costly, and enrollment was declining at all three of the county’s high schools.

“The school board did make that decision, in my opinion, just months before they probably would have had to make it because of the economic downturn,” Eubanks said.

After the 2006-07 school year, 364 Jonesville High students and 117 Lockhart High students became part of the consolidated Union County High School, according to S.C. Department of Education records.

Elementary and middle school students continue to use the Lockhart High building. Even before consolidation, all grade levels shared one facility, but because the lower grades don't require as much technology and lab space as the high school would have needed, the district has been able to focus funds on maintenance.

Jonesville High now houses the town's municipal complex, but still bears banners and logos with the school's old colors and Wildcat mascot.

Current Union County Superintendent Bill Roach said while the decision has come to be accepted by many, it remains an "open wound" for some residents.

“What happened then was, you’re shutting a page of history for a lot of those folks,” he said.

Small town voices

Bernice Canupp owns Lockhart Café, one of only a handful of businesses operating in the town limits.

“I hated it,” Canupp said of the consolidation effort.

Lockhart Café is surrounded by old mill houses that have outlived the mill that was once the heart of the community.

In 1994, Milliken & Co., the town’s major employer, pulled out. Since then, new development has come slowly.

Recently, a Dollar General — referred to by some as “mini Walmart” — was built on the outskirts of town. Rounding out the local businesses are Bailey’s Café, another small restaurant, and two gas stations.

A grocery store, pharmacy or doctor’s office are at least a 20-minute drive away in either Union or Chester County.

In front of the old mill pond, a painted red wall reads, “Welcome to the Beautiful Town of Lockhart.”

“Now, there’s really nothing here,” said Lockhart resident Ronnie Swanger as he passed a recent afternoon fishing at the pond. “It’s just a little forgotten mill village now.”

Swanger, a 1965 Lockhart High graduate, has lived in the town all his life.

“We had our own school, our own teachers," he said. "When I graduated, we only had about 17 seniors."

A 15-minute drive down Highway 9 from Lockhart is Jonesville, a larger and less centralized town.

Jonesville has more residents and businesses than Lockhart, but shared its feelings about consolidation.

Kolby Gage, a lifelong Jonesville resident, was in the school’s final graduating class in 2007. He said he didn’t think much about consolidation at the time. A decade later, he said he’s proud to have been part of history.

“There’s never another class coming from that building,” he said. “It’s part of the culture, even still today.”

Losing an identity

A lingering sore spot for Jonesville and Lockhart residents is how the consolidation plan was executed.

When the high schools were combined, school trustees decided to keep Union High's Yellow Jackets mascot at Union County High. That upset residents who had supported a plan proposed by a group of students, teachers and community members that would have created a new mascot, the Wolfpack, and new school colors to go with the new name.

But school trustees said redoing the signs at the school and elsewhere in the county would cost too much.

“I was disappointed in the way they did that,” lifelong Lockhart resident Gerald Gregory said.

Gage agreed.

“If they were going to combine the schools, they should’ve had a new mascot,” he said. “They shut down Jonesville, they shut down Lockhart, and just made Union bigger.”

Coming together

Some efforts were made to honor the connection the two last high school classes in the Jonesville and Lockhart buildings felt to their old schools.

The Jonesville and Lockhart high classes of 2008 and 2009 were allowed to be academically ranked with both Union County High students and with the Jonesville and Lockhart high groups, respectively. For two years, three high school valedictorians were recognized in Union County.

Students also could choose a transcript bearing the name of Union County, Jonesville or Lockhart high school.

“When it was all said and done, people wanted it to work,” Eubanks said. “And, over time, those people are the reason it worked.”

Eubanks understands why residents were upset. He said he told district staff to be ready to listen to people's concerns.

“We had to have empathy for those folks who had a sense of loss. A sense of healing had to be there,” he said. “The administration, the school board, everyone had to be a good listener. You weren’t going to talk anyone into understanding or accepting the schools were closed.”

A Cowpens High School graduate, Eubanks is no stranger to consolidation. He became principal of Broome High School one year after Spartanburg School District 3 merged Cowpens and Pacolet high schools.

Community members more readily accepted that consolidation because the new school was a fresh start with a new name and mascot, Eubanks said.

“I didn’t disagree with them. I tried to approach it like, ‘I know exactly what you’re talking about. I know those schools are a big part of your community,’” he said. “I think the greatest concern I heard was, ‘We will lose our identity.’ I said, ‘Try to help develop a new identity with that Union County High School.’ I feel there has been an attempt to do that, and just by virtue of the fact I didn’t hear anyone say the consolidation was a problem the last time I was down there, I think a lot of people did that.”

Acceptance

Even though the high school is gone, Gregory said he remains proud of Lockhart schools.

“We all still love and support that school and try to go to about everything they have,” Gregory said.

Students from Lockhart have benefited from going to Union County High, and have more opportunities there now than they would have had at the old school, Swanger said.

“I really didn’t like it to start with, but I really think it’s a good thing now,” he said.

There was also no way the district could've sustained three high schools in the long run, given the declining enrollment, aging facilities and small tax base, Eubanks said.

Roach said in the decade since consolidation, the district has worked hard for its students and its residents. The district has increased the programs offered at Union County High to accommodate students from across the county.

Gregory said while he thinks the process should’ve been handled differently, the bitterness many once felt has long since disappeared.

“You’ve got some with grudges from the start, but it has been good for the kids,” he said.

Eubanks said that sentiment is what has ultimately prevailed.

“There are a lot of people who still have a lot of value for those two schools in their soul, and that’s not going away,” Eubanks said. “I think everyone has come to accept, to a great degree, that it was in the best interest of the students in Union County so they could be better provided for academically.”

Dollar General Expands Supply Chain Growth

Dollar General is expanding its global supply chain network, including the opening of its first ground-up, dual facility in Blair, Nebraska and two permanent regional distribution hubs in Newnan, Georgia and Fort Worth, Texas.The company is also expanding in Jonesville, South Carolina and Amsterdam, New York at existing facilities.“The recent additions to our supply chain network aim to provide greater efficiencies, create additional jobs and drive pos...

Dollar General is expanding its global supply chain network, including the opening of its first ground-up, dual facility in Blair, Nebraska and two permanent regional distribution hubs in Newnan, Georgia and Fort Worth, Texas.

The company is also expanding in Jonesville, South Carolina and Amsterdam, New York at existing facilities.

“The recent additions to our supply chain network aim to provide greater efficiencies, create additional jobs and drive positive economic impact,” said Tony Zuazo, Dollar General’s executive vice president of global supply chain. “We’re excited to continue growing our distribution center network to further support store growth and to better serve our customers and local communities.”

Distribution Center in Nebraska Will Create 400 Jobs

Dollar General recently opened its Blair, Nebraska distribution center, which is expected to create approximately 400 new careers at full capacity and represents an approximate $140 million investment in Washington County. As the company’s first ground-up dual distribution center, Blair combines the efficiencies of traditional and DG Fresh supply chain networks, which is its strategic, multi-phased shift to self-distribution of frozen and refrigerated products. The DG Fresh network is currently delivering to more than 19,000 stores from 12 facilities. A formal grand opening celebration is scheduled for summer 2023.

Permanent Regional Facilities to Employ 200 Workers

The company recently increased distribution center storage capacity by more than two million square feet through two new permanent regional facilities in Newnan, Georgia and Fort Worth, Texas. Each facility will employ approximately 200 individuals at full capacity and serve as an intermediary point between import locations and Dollar General’s distribution center network.

Jonesville, South Carolina

The company announced an approximately $45 million expansion investment in its Jonesville, South Carolina distribution center, which first opened in 2005. The 250,000 square foot addition was completed in spring 2023.

Amsterdam, New York

Dollar General plans to build a 170,000 square foot DG Fresh facility to complement the company’s traditional distribution center that opened in 2019. The company currently plans to close on the property by fall 2023 and begin construction in 2024.

Dollar General is currently under construction on three distribution centers in North Little Rock, Arkansas; Aurora, Colorado; and Salem, Oregon.

The Tiny Town Of Jonesville In North Carolina Has A Little Bit Of Everything

December is a fun time all across the United States with the holidays and winter festivities in full swing. Whether your idea of a winter getaway is to a tropical beach setting or a snow-capped mountain, we have some wonderful destinations to show you. Here are some of the best places to visit in the U.S. in December for you to start planning your next getaway. Table of Contents This article is part our Best Places to Visit in the USA series. If you’re looking for the top places to visit around the country in each month...

December is a fun time all across the United States with the holidays and winter festivities in full swing. Whether your idea of a winter getaway is to a tropical beach setting or a snow-capped mountain, we have some wonderful destinations to show you. Here are some of the best places to visit in the U.S. in December for you to start planning your next getaway.

Table of Contents

This article is part our Best Places to Visit in the USA series. If you’re looking for the top places to visit around the country in each month of the year then look no further, our guides will give you all the seasonal travel inspiration you need to find the perfect location for your next getaway:

SPRING IN USA SUMMER IN USA FALL IN USA WINTER IN USA
March June September December
April July October January
May August November February

Best Places to Visit in The USA In December

If you are wondering where to visit in December in the USA, we have some extra special destinations for you to explore. From some places you have possibly always wanted to go, to hidden gems you may not have heard about yet. Here are some of our favorites that we think you’ll love too.

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Best Attractions To Visit In The USA In December To Avoid Crowds

One of the best reasons to travel in December is that you can enjoy some of your favorite destinations without summer crowds. These next few destinations are unique in their own way and make for a delightful December getaway.

Best Places To Visit In The US In December For Outdoor Adventure

If you enjoy the outdoors and are looking for some of the best places to travel in December in the USA with stunning views and the opportunity to enjoy the outdoors these next couple of destinations should be on your trip list.

11 Once-In-A-Lifetime Tours That Show Off America's Most Breathtaking Landscapes

Build Your Own Travel-Themed Advent Calendar Or Christmas Countdown With These 12 Gifts

You Might Be Surprised To Hear The Predictions About America's Upcoming Winter

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Best Places To Visit In December For Events

December is a festive time of year, but there are certain places in the US that really take holiday celebrations to a whole new level. Here are a couple of the best places to travel in December in the USA to celebrate the holidays.

Best Hidden Gems to Visit in the US in December

We’ve all heard about the top spots in the US for wintertime getaways like ski lodges in Vail, or heading to Key West for a beach getaway, but there are plenty of hidden gems just waiting to be discovered. The next few destinations you may not be as familiar with, but they are just as spectacular as those you are used to enjoying.

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When it comes to winter travel some of us would rather hole up in a cozy cabin by the fireplace, others are looking for adventures. No matter what your ideal December vacation looks like we hope you have discovered a few new destinations that you are excited about visiting. If you have any other destinations that you’ve fallen in love with please share them with a comment so we can add them to our best places to visit in the U.S. in December list.

It’s never too early to start planning your next summer getaway too. Here are some of our favorite destinations to visit in July so you can get an early start on a fun summer trip.

Belk department store says it is laying off over 300 workers in South Carolina

Charlotte-based Belk department store is laying off more than 300 workers starting next month and closing a South Carolina fulfillment center.The Jonesville, S.C., fulfillment center at 3805 Furman L. Fendley Highway will close “in the near future,” according to a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification letter sent Feb. 28 to the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce.The layoff of 310 workers is expected to run from April 30 through May 28, Tim May, general vice president of supply chain operat...

Charlotte-based Belk department store is laying off more than 300 workers starting next month and closing a South Carolina fulfillment center.

The Jonesville, S.C., fulfillment center at 3805 Furman L. Fendley Highway will close “in the near future,” according to a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification letter sent Feb. 28 to the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce.

The layoff of 310 workers is expected to run from April 30 through May 28, Tim May, general vice president of supply chain operations said in a WARN report filed March 9.

“All positions and jobs at this location will be eliminated,” May said in the letter.

Some employees may be offered employment at other Belk locations. “However, we do not know at this time which employees, if any, will be given this option,” May said in the letter.

While other stores including Best Buy, Home Depot, Lowe’s and Amazon are adding fulfillment centers in the Charlotte region to meet distribution demands, Belk is cutting back.

The decision to close the Jonesville center meets the needs of the company’s supply chain network after review of internal processes, Belk spokeswoman Jessica Rohlik told the Observer on Thursday.

“We know the closure will affect associates at the Jonesville fulfillment center, and we are committed to working with them in the coming weeks to provide resources during the transition,” Rohlik said.

The Union County center filled thousands of online orders each day, according to a 7News report.

Two years ago, Belk said it would invest $2.5 million to upgrade its Blythewood, S.C., distribution center over the next five years, The State newspaper in Columbia reported. The facility employs up to 103 people.

It’s been just over a year since Belk, owned by private equity firm Sycamore Partners, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Feb. 23, 2021. It had a plan to restructure and eliminate $450 million of debt.

Belk emerged from bankruptcy protection a day later. At that time the company said it did not intend to close stores or layoff any employees.

Last summer, Belk promoted Nir Patel from president and chief of merchandising officer to CEO, replacing Lisa Harper. Patel’s background included e-commerce and marketing for Belk for five years.

In July, Belk said it would sublease its corporate office on Tyvola Road where about 1,200 employees work.

Last month, retail experts told the Observer the iconic, Charlotte-based department store hasn’t been doing enough since emerging from bankruptcy.

The 134-year-old company has nearly 300 store in 16 southern states. Belk has about 17,000 full- and part-time workers at its stores and distribution centers.

This story was originally published March 11, 2022, 10:00 AM.

Gov. Cooper visits Elkin, Jonesville

...

Elkin Mayor Sam Bishop shakes hands with Gov, Roy Cooper Tuesday.

[…]

Gov. Roy Cooper speaks in Elkin at a press conference announcing $19 million in grant funding to benefit the Jonesville water plant and the Yadkin Valley Sewer Authority.

[…]

Gov. Roy Cooper visited Elkin and Jonesville on Tuesday to tour local water and sewer plants which will soon be getting much-needed upgrades thanks to funding from the American Rescue Plan Act.

Jonesville will be receiving nearly $15 millionfor infrastructure improvements to its water treatment plant and water lines.

The Yadkin Valley Sewer Authority, which serves Elkin, Jonesville and Ronda, will be receiving $4 million for floodplain resiliency wastewater collection system improvements.

Cooper was a given a tour of the water treatment plant in Jonesville, including the original building constructed in the 1950s. Jonesville Town Manager Michael Pardue showed the governor corroded pipes which are common due to the age of the infrastructure which often causes water leaks, especially during season changes. Cooper also had a tour of the YVSA sewer facility prior to a short press conference.

YVSA Executive Director Nicole Johnston spoke about the state funds that have already benefited the regional sewer system and the new improvements that will be made possible by additional money.

Johnston said that since Cooper took office in 2017 the Yadkin Valley Sewer Authority has received more than $16.8 million in grant and loan funds for much-needed upgrades to the treatment plant and collection system.

“This funding that was received met the critical need of the citizens, businesses, the hospital, the schools, and the industry in the YVSA service area and now provides a sound waste water treatment plant which will serve future needs of our area and protect the water quality of the Yadkin River,” Johnston said.

Secretary Elizabeth Biser of the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality said that clean, affordable water was a “top priority.”

“Without clearn water literally nothing else matters,” Biser said. “These funds are going to go a long way to protect public health, the environment, upgrade essential services and also make sure we’re keeping rates affordable for local residents.”

Pardue added that it was a “transformational day” for Jonesville.

“This is going to take Jonesville into the next century,” Pardue said of the nearly $15 million that will be used to upgrade the water system.

“These funds will allow us to keep our rate structure in such a way to allow our citizens to have affordable, clean, clear water,” he said.

Pardue said the new upgrades will allow for much greater efficiency for the town’s water system.

“Our water we produce today is very safe and very clean considering the circumstances, but we’re very inefficient,” Pardue said.

Cooper praised the local leadership, saying it was a “coordinated effort.” He also said the regionalization of sewer services through the Yadkin Valley Sewer Authority was a model for other areas and commended the “visionary leadership” that lead its establishment.

“It is much more cost effective and want to encourage more of it,” he said of the regionalization efforts.

Seeing first hand the facilities that will be affected by this funding was nice, Cooper said, but he said his thoughts were particular on how these upgrades will benefit the people of the area.

“I can’t help but think of the families and people who have children who worry about whether their water is clean; the businesses that might be able to come and locate here that maybe couldn’t have otherwise that’ll provide a great paying job for mom or dad for that family,” Cooper said. “Everything does depend on clean water, if you don’t have it you can’t have a community.”

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