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South Carolina Divorce 101

Divorce is a difficult decision for anyone, whether it's you or your partner who initiates it. It's a painful experience that can leave you feeling shattered and alone in the dark. When you made your wedding vows, you did so with the intention of being together for life. You invested a lot of time and money into your wedding, inviting friends and family from all over South Carolina to share in your joy.

Now, you're faced with the harsh reality that you and your former spouse are no longer together. As your family law attorney in Moore, SC, we understand how overwhelming this can be. We've assisted many clients through the divorce process and had the knowledge and tools to help them work through it and move on to greener pastures.

The CDH Law Firm Approach to Child Custody in South Carolina

Did you know that the U.S. Census Bureau states that 25% of children younger than 21 live with just one parent while the other parent resides elsewhere in the country? In such circumstances, many families must navigate the complicated and legally complex process of child custody. As seasoned family law attorneys, we have represented clients in all aspects and legal stages of child custody and support.

We focus in providing services for a range of issues, including but not limited to:

  • Drafting Reasonable Proposed Parenting Plans
  • Preparing Child Support Calculations
  • Communication with a Guardian ad Litem (if applicable)
  • Securing De Facto Custodian / Psychological Parent Rights
  • Negotiating Agreements Relating to Child Custody
  • Prosecuting Claims Related to Domestic Violence
  • Prosecuting and Defending Claims for
  • Adoption,
  • Termination of Parental Rights
  • Custody, and
  • Visitation
  • Defending Claims Alleging Abuse / Neglect by the Department of Social Services

Every family has its own distinct characteristics, and as such, child-related agreements must also be customized to fit each unique situation. In South Carolina, our team of skilled family law attorneys takes the time to understand our clients' individual goals and needs and tailor our services accordingly.

 Law Firm Moore, SC

South Carolina Alimony 101

When you get married, you go into the partnership believing that you'll be together forever. It makes sense, then, that most divorcing couples don't know very much about alimony in South Carolina (also referred to as spousal support). They ask questions such as:

  • Who gets alimony?
  • What is a reasonable amount of alimony?

Fortunately, working with a family law lawyer in Moore, SC, can answer those questions and make alimony easier to understand and approach.

 Family Support Attorney Moore, SC
Family Law Attorney Moore, SC

What is Alimony in South Carolina?

Many individuals often mistake alimony for child support, but they are, in fact, two distinct forms of financial obligation and not mutually exclusive. Alimony was established to safeguard a supported spouse in the event of a divorce or separation. For example, a spouse who did not work during the course of the marriage would generally have a stronger alimony claim than a spouse who worked throughout the marriage. Likewise, a spouse who worked throughout the marriage but made less than the other spouse would have a stronger alimony claim than a spouse who worked and earned equivalent income to the supporting spouse.

In many cases, a spouse may choose to stay at home to tend to the children and manage the household. Oftentimes, the spouse who remains at home has sacrificed their career or education to care for the family. In such instances, a divorce could leave the financially weaker spouse in a state of financial turmoil. Without that support system, they will have to start over from scratch. These are some factors the Court will consider in evaluating an appropriate alimony case. Throughout your marriage, you have structured your quality of life based on a budget determined by your finances. While all expenses are shared by both partners, what happens if you have been financially dependent on your spouse and need to support yourself?

At Cobb, Dill, & Hammett, LLC, we aim to assist you in securing the alimony you need to support both yourself and your children. At the same time, we want to ensure that you are not overpaying your spouse, if you are the one required to pay. You may be required to pay an amount that could leave you in a difficult financial situation. Regardless, it's crucial to have the right legal representation to guide you through the alimony process in South Carolina.

The CDH Law Firm Approach to Alimonyin South Carolina

Some people may assume financial responsibilities to a former partner are end with the filing of a divorce decree. However, if the court has mandated alimony payments, then the financial obligations survive. Failure to meet those obligations can lead to serious legal and financial consequences. Family law attorneys at CHSA Law, LLC have years of experience representing clients throughout the divorce process, including alimony determinations.

Our legal services cover many aspects of alimony law, such as:

  • Negotiating Temporary and Final Alimony Payments
  • Modifying Alimony
  • Providing Advice on Reasonable Alimony
  • Filing to Collect Unpaid Alimony

Though our family law attorneys are fearless negotiators and litigators, we always strive to keep your legal proceedings as seamless and straightforward as possible. Our goal is to help reach an agreement on alimony that is reasonable for both you and your spouse. However, compromises aren't always possible. If needed, our lawyers will fight aggressively on your behalf to help ensure your financial rights are protected.

 Law Firm Moore, SC

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Trust the Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Difference

Dealing with family law cases can be incredibly trying, particularly when it comes to matters of separation or divorce. As your family law attorney in Moore, SC, we recognize the challenges you're facing. With that in mind, know that we're committed to offering empathetic legal counsel on your behalf, no matter how contentious or confusing your situation may become. Contact our law offices today for your initial family law consultation.

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Latest News in Moore, SC

South Carolina football injury update: OL starter Jakai Moore questionable vs Tennessee

COLUMBIA – Injuries continue to plague South Carolina football's offensive line as starting right guard Jakai Moore was downgraded to questionable by coach Shane Beamer on his radio call-in show Thursday....

COLUMBIA – Injuries continue to plague South Carolina football's offensive line as starting right guard Jakai Moore was downgraded to questionable by coach Shane Beamer on his radio call-in show Thursday.

Beamer said Tuesday that Moore did not practice but was optimistic he would be available to play when the Gamecocks (2-2, 1-1 SEC) face Tennessee (3-1, 0-1) in Knoxville on Saturday (7:30 p.m., SEC Network). The 6-6, 318-pound senior suffered a right shoulder injury during last week's 37-30 win over Mississippi State.

If Moore is ruled out, freshman Trovon Baugh will start at right guard after seeing increased usage in the last two games. Baugh, a former 3-star prospect, played 46 snaps to Moore's 23 against Mississippi State. He would be South Carolina's second true freshman starter on the offensive line, joining left tackle Markee Anderson.

South Carolina's offensive line has lost three players — four-star freshman Markee Anderson, freshman center Ryan Brubaker and Mercer transfer Ni Mansell — to season-ending injuries since the start of preseason practice. Jaylen Nichols, a presumed starting tackle, is also questionable to return this year after suffering a knee injury during the spring game.

Starting tackle Cason Henry has been out since suffering a lower-body injury in Week 1 with no timeline for return, and Beamer said freshman walk-on Chase Sweigart also is not currently practicing due to an injury.

The Gamecocks will also be without star wide receiver Antwane "Juice" Wells for the second week in a row against Tennessee. The preseason All-SEC selection exited with a left foot injury after scoring a touchdown on the opening drive against Georgia, and there is no clear timeline for his return. Sophomore O'Mega Blake will start in Wells' place with freshman Tyshawn Russell as the backup.

Follow South Carolina football beat reporter Emily Adams on X @eaadams6 and subscribe to The Greenville News for exclusive Gamecocks content: https://subscribe.greenvilleonline.com/offers.

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University of South Carolina names next dean of Darla Moore School of Business

Rohit Verma will be the next dean of the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. He takes over the position on Aug. 1, according to a university news release.Verma joins the Moore School from VinUniversity in Hanoi, Vietnam, where he serves as the founding provost of Vietnam’s first private, not-for-profit university based on international standards, according to the news release. Verma is also ...

Rohit Verma will be the next dean of the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. He takes over the position on Aug. 1, according to a university news release.

Verma joins the Moore School from VinUniversity in Hanoi, Vietnam, where he serves as the founding provost of Vietnam’s first private, not-for-profit university based on international standards, according to the news release. Verma is also a professor of operations, technology and information management at Cornell University’s SC Johnson College of Business. Prior to his role at VinUniversity, which was established in collaboration with Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania, Verma served as dean of external affairs at Cornell’s SC Johnson College of Business.

Verma’s leadership experience at Cornell also includes serving as the executive director for the Center for Hospitality Research and as the founding executive director for the Institute for Healthy Futures. While on leave from Cornell since 2019, Verma has served in several concurrent leadership positions at VinUniversity, where he won the Excellent Leader Award in 2021.

“Dr. Verma is an award-winning teacher, a successful researcher and an innovative leader, and we are pleased to welcome him to the Carolina family,” USC President Michael Amiridis said in the release. “His excellent academic record and his international perspective will be great complements to the leading-edge work of the Darla Moore School of Business.”

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During his time with VinUniversity, Verma has recruited accomplished and diverse academic leaders and faculty from more than 10 countries, the release stated. He established a fully integrated campus life system and developed curriculum programs for all degree programs based on active learning and experiential learning.

“Dr. Verma is a world-class leader whose experience and success at both Cornell University and VinUniversity have prepared him to add tremendous value to the Moore School,” Donna Arnett, USC provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said in the release. “I look forward to working with Dr. Verma to uphold and enhance the Moore School’s outstanding international reputation, and to continue advancing the incredible contributions the school is making to the world of business.”

Moore to the Point: Artificial intelligence is here. Is South Carolina ready?

As we move further into the 21st century, it is becoming increasingly clear that artificial intelligence will play a major role in shaping the future of our economy and our world. It is already presenting unprecedented opportunities for innovation and entrepreneurship. It also poses a significant challenge for our state, as up to 40% of jobs in South Carolina are at risk of being automated by AI in the next 15 years. That is over 700,000 of our neighbors whose jobs will likely be impacted soon. Considering that AI is developing faster than a...

As we move further into the 21st century, it is becoming increasingly clear that artificial intelligence will play a major role in shaping the future of our economy and our world. It is already presenting unprecedented opportunities for innovation and entrepreneurship. It also poses a significant challenge for our state, as up to 40% of jobs in South Carolina are at risk of being automated by AI in the next 15 years. That is over 700,000 of our neighbors whose jobs will likely be impacted soon. Considering that AI is developing faster than anyone anticipated, including the AI experts, these job displacements could also be arriving sooner than anticipated.

To ensure South Carolina and its communities are well prepared to compete in the future economy, we must take bold action. I believe there are two important steps we should take immediately.

First, we should identify and engage with various AI experts, locally and globally, to help understand the threats and opportunities facing us and to guide our planning for the future. Too often, incumbent stakeholders dominate planning activities for a state or community, but that approach has an inherent weakness during times of dramatic change. It’s at those times that we need the change agents themselves to help inform and guide the forward thinking since they are more knowledgeable about where things are heading than those of us trying to catch up. It will be imperative that we find the right AI expertise to come alongside our established leadership and bring us up to speed on the challenges and opportunities we are facing.

Second, we should develop a statewide AI strategy with government, industry and academic leaders at the table. However, the effort should be led, once again, by experts in the field of AI. It’s imperative that our strategy be well informed and action oriented with clear public accountability for results. A successful strategy will help ensure that South Carolina is well-positioned to take advantage of the opportunities presented by AI while simultaneously mitigating the risk. It would likely include efforts to develop the AI talent pool, encourage collaboration and innovation across industries, and create incentives to entice AI research and commercialization here.

As we work to prepare our state for the impact of AI on jobs and our economy, it is important to remember that AI is both a threat and an opportunity. By embracing and understanding AI and the foundational changes it is creating, we can better position our economic development strategies and resources to ensure South Carolina remains a leader in the global economy for years to come.

Peter Drucker once said, “The greatest danger in times of turbulence is not the turbulence itself, but to act with yesterday’s logic.” Let’s take action now to ensure our state is well prepared for the future and not rely on yesterday’s logic when planning for tomorrow.

— John Moore is a principal with Momenteum Strategies, an Upstate-based consulting firm specializing in helping communities and their economic development organizations build thriving, impactful innovation ecosystems.

Dr. Kim Moore named as new Richland Two Superintendent

Moore had previously been serving in the Pasco County, FL school district.COLUMBIA, S.C. — Richland School District Two has hired Dr. Kim Moore to be its new superintendent after a months long search.The school board announced their decision Tuesday night, voting 6-1 in favor of her nomination, with Board Chair Linda Agostini being the only no vote. Agostini objected to some of the process in making the selection, not against Moore herself.Moo...

Moore had previously been serving in the Pasco County, FL school district.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Richland School District Two has hired Dr. Kim Moore to be its new superintendent after a months long search.

The school board announced their decision Tuesday night, voting 6-1 in favor of her nomination, with Board Chair Linda Agostini being the only no vote. Agostini objected to some of the process in making the selection, not against Moore herself.

Moore had previously been serving as Assistant Superintendent of Career and Innovative Programs in the Pasco County School District of Florida.

"I walk the talk that I talk," Moore said in comments shortly after the announcement was made. "We are committed to one thing and one thing only: and that is to provide the best educational experience to each and every child that we have the privilege to educate.

Dr. Moore and two others--Dr. Nia Campbell and Dr. Benjamin Henry--were named as finalists earlier this month. They were in town this week for interviews with administrators, teachers, parents, students, and community members.

Officials said the national search resulted in 39 applicants from 20 states aspiring to lead the fifth-largest school district in South Carolina.

Moore takes over for a district that has been without a superintendent since January, when former superintendent Dr. Baron Davis and the school board agreed to part ways. Nancy Gregory has been serving as the interim since then.

Here's biographical information about Moore provided by the district:

Dr. Kim Moore

Dr. Kim Moore is the Assistant Superintendent of Career and Innovative Programs in the Pasco County School District of Florida, leading their workforce development programs, PreK-12 STEM/STEAM schools, and technical college.

Moore is a retired U.S. Army Chemical Corps Officer, Adjunct Faculty Member for Nova Southeastern University, and Executive Director for Maxwell Leadership.

Moore says she is passionate about leadership and education, and her philosophy is to lead by example.

During Moore’s military career, she served in numerous leadership positions, specializing in Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) Weapons, and Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). Her last assignment was at The Pentagon as Assistant for Negotiations, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Department of the Army.

Supreme Court hears tax case on ‘income’: It may ‘have the biggest fiscal policy effects of any court decision,’ expert says

People exit the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, June 27, 2023.Minh Connors | The Washington Post | Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday on a case that could affect broad swaths of the U.S. tax code and federal revenue.The closely watched case, ...

People exit the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, June 27, 2023.

Minh Connors | The Washington Post | Getty Images

The Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday on a case that could affect broad swaths of the U.S. tax code and federal revenue.

The closely watched case, Moore v. United States, involves a Washington couple, Charles and Kathleen Moore. They own a controlling interest in a profitable foreign company affected by a tax enacted via former President Donald Trump’s 2017 tax overhaul.

The Moores are fighting a levy on company earnings that weren’t distributed to them — which challenges the definition of income — and could have sweeping effects on the U.S. tax code, according to experts.

“This could have the biggest fiscal policy effects of any court decision in the modern era,” said Matt Gardner, a senior fellow at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, who co-authored a report on the case.

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The case challenges a levy, known as “deemed repatriation,” enacted via the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Designed as a transition tax, the legislation required a one-time levy on earnings and profits accumulated in foreign entities after 1986.

While the 16th Amendment outlines the legal definition of income, the Moore case questions whether individuals must “realize” or receive profits before incurring taxes. It’s an issue that has been raised during past federal “billionaire tax” debates and could affect future proposals, including wealth taxes.

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan, who helped draft the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, said at a Brookings Institution event in September that the goal was to “finance a conversion from one system to another, and it wasn’t to justify a wealth tax.”

Ryan, who doesn’t support a wealth tax, said using the Moores’ argument to block one would require getting rid of “a third of the tax code.”

Pass-through businesses could be affected

Depending on how the court decides this case, there could be either small ripples or a major effect on the tax code, according to Daniel Bunn, president and CEO of the Tax Foundation, who has written about the topic.

If the court decides the Moores incurred a tax on unrealized income and says the levy is unconstitutional, it could affect the future taxation of so-called pass-through entities, such as partnerships, limited liability corporations and S corporations, he said.

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“You’ve got to pay attention to the way the rules are going to impact your business, especially if you’re doing things in a cross-border context,” Bunn said.

There’s also the potential for a “substantial impact” on federal revenue, which could influence future tax policy, Bunn said. If deemed repatriation were fully struck down for corporate and noncorporate taxpayers, the Tax Foundation estimates federal revenue would be reduced by $346 billion over the next decade.

However, with a decision not expected until 2024, it’s difficult to predict how the Supreme Court may rule on this case. “There’s a lot of uncertainty about the scope of this thing,” Gardner added.

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