Car Accident Attorney inRidgeland, SC

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CHSA Law, LLC Fighting
for Your Rights in Ridgeland, SC

When an accident comes without warning, even the most prepared person can fall victim. One moment, you're walking to a restaurant after a long day of work. The next moment, someone else's negligence and carelessness change your life forever. Personal injury victims aren't just the victims of negligence they suffer from pain, concern over family and ability to work. Often, these victims do not have the luxury of worrying about work and family, because they're clinging to life in an ER. Without a personal injury attorney in Ridgeland, SC, by their side, they mistakenly provide official statements to insurance agencies and accept settlement offers that only account for a fraction of what they have lost.

If you have recently been hurt in an accident, you may be asking questions like:

  • "What happens now?"
  • "How will I pay for my hospital bills?"
  • "Will I get fired from my job?"
  • "Will I be able to function independently ever again?"

With more than 100,000 car accidents in South Carolina every year, we hear these questions every day. Our hearts hurt for those who are suffering due to no fault of their own. Accident victims are not only left with questions like those above; they're also forced to deal with costs associated with medical bills, car repair, follow-up appointments, and loss of income.

While reading these facts can be bleak, there is a silver lining. South Carolina law dictates that those who are found responsible for your pain and suffering may be obligated to pay for your expenses. CHSA Law, LLC exists for that exact reason to make sure that negligent parties are held accountable. We fight on your behalf to make sure you get the compensation you deserve. We aren't afraid to go toe-to-toe with greedy insurance agencies who do not have your best interests at heart.

Our overarching goal is to protect your rights, and our law firm is uniquely positioned to do so, with attorney Michael Dill‘s vast experience in the auto insurance industry.

Personal Injury Attorney Ridgeland, SC
Service Areas

We offer comprehensive vehicle representation for a number of different automobile accidents, including:

  • Distracted Driving
  • Drunk Driving
  • Rollovers
  • Multi-Vehicle Accidents
  • Automobile Defects
  • Roadway Defects
  • Speeding
  • Reckless Driving
  • Uninsured Motorists or
    Underinsured Drivers
  • Rear-End Collisions
  • Car Rental Accidents
  • RV Accidents

If you know you have been involved in one of the car accidents above, the time to seek experienced representation is now. Generally, car accident victims have three years from the date of their injuries to file a personal injury claim in Ridgeland. That time frame can be reduced in certain circumstances. When a wrongful death is involved, surviving family members must take action in a similar time frame.

The bottom line is that speed is of the essence in these cases. When we sit down with you to learn more about your accident, we will help you understand South Carolina law so that you are fully informed before taking legal action. The sooner we can dig into the details of your case, the sooner we can fight for your rights.

We Recover Compensation
When You Need It Most

The law states that personal injury victims are entitled to compensation for the full extent of their injuries. Why? Because the primary goal of injury compensation in Ridgeland, SC, is to help the victim return to the state they would have been in, if the accident never occurred. In the literal sense, doing so isn't possible. The law cannot reverse the incredible suffering and pain that accompanies a severe injury. As such, personal injury victims are entitled to receive a financial reward that equals those damages.

How much compensation you get depends on the facts and nuances of your case. With that said, you may be able to recover compensation for the following needs:

  • Rehab-Related Expenses like
    Physical Therapy
  • All Medical Expenses
  • Pain and Suffering
  • Long-Term Disability
  • Lost Wages and Loss of
    Future Income Earning Ability
  • Disfigurement
  • Emotional Distress
  • Mental Anguish

If you or someone you love was recently injured in a car wreck, contact our office today to speak with a personal injury lawyer in Ridgeland, SC. The sooner you call, the sooner we can begin fighting for your rights and the compensation you need.

 Personal Injury Lawyer Ridgeland, SC The-Cobb-Dill-Hammett-Difference
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What Our Clients Say

The Role of Negligence in Your
Ridgeland Personal Injury Case

If there were one common truth that we can count on, it's that life is unpredictable. Sometimes, accidents just happen. However, when recklessness and negligence come into play in situations where accidents cause personal injuries, the negligent party can be held responsible under South Carolina law. For victims to have a chance at compensation, the party responsible for the accident must be proven to be negligent. When a party or parties are negligent, they fail to take appropriate care when performing an action, like driving an automobile.

 Car Accident Attorney Ridgeland, SC
At CHSA Law, LLC, our team works to prove negligence
for our clients by proving:
  • The defendant had an obligation to look out for your safety.
  • The defendant did not uphold that duty.
  • There was causation between the defendant's breach of duty and the injuries you sustained.
  • You suffered real damages.

After an accident occurs, it is critical to take certain steps to help prove the responsible party's negligence and maximize the compensation you rightly deserve.

Steps to Maximize Compensation
After an Accident in Ridgeland, SC

All too often, car wreck victims don't get the compensation they need because they failed to take the proper steps after their accident. Don't let this be you. By having comprehensive records of your car accident and its aftermath, you have a much better chance of protecting your rights and maximizing compensation for your bills and injuries. If you have been injured in an automobile accident in Ridgeland, follow these steps before doing anything else:

1.

Go to a Doctor

First and foremost, seek medical attention for any injuries that you have sustained. You might not realize it now, but your injuries may be more complex and serious than you think. Damage like head trauma and back injuries are not easy to diagnose on your own and sometimes take time to surface. A full medical examination will help reveal the extent of your injuries, lead to a quicker recovery, and help document the injuries you sustained. This last part is essential to prove the significance of your injuries.

 Law Firm Ridgeland, SC
2.

File an
Accident Report

The second step you should take is to report your injuries to the correct authorities. The authorities change depending on the circumstances of your accident. If you were involved in a car wreck in Ridgeland, you should file your report with the highway authorities and any associated insurance agencies. Regardless of where you were injured and how the wreck occurred, the biggest takeaway here is to file a report. That way, you have an established, official record of the incident that can be referred to down the line.

Personal Injury Attorney Ridgeland, SC
3.

Preserve Evidence
if Possible

Personal injury cases in Ridgeland are won with evidence. It might sound like the job of the police, but it's important that you try to secure any evidence that you can collect relating to your accident, especially if you are injured. Evidence in auto accident cases tends to disappear quickly. By preserving evidence soon after the accident, it can be used in court. For example, if you cannot get a witness statement immediately after your wreck, their testimony may come across as less reliable. Completing this task on your own can be quite difficult, especially after a serious accident. That's why it's so crucial to complete the last step below.

 Personal Injury Lawyer Ridgeland, SC
4.

Contact a Lawyer

One of the most intelligent, important steps you can take after a car accident is calling a personal injury attorney in Ridgeland, SC. At CHSA Law, LLC, we will assist you with every step of your personal injury case to ensure that your rights are protected. That includes gathering all types of evidence relevant to your case. When we investigate your accident, we will determine the person who is liable for your losses. If there are multiple liable parties, we will hold each one accountable for their negligence.

Every personal injury case is different, which is why experience counts when it comes to car accident compensation. Our track record speaks for itself, but no number of past results will guarantee a perfect outcome. What we can guarantee, however, is our undivided attention and fierce dedication to your case, no matter the circumstances. Unlike other personal injury law firms in Ridgeland, you can have peace of mind knowing your best interests always come first at CHSA Law, LLC.

 Car Accident Attorney Ridgeland, SC

Common Car Accidents in
Ridgeland, SC

At CHSA Law, LLC, we have years of experience handling some of Ridgeland's most complicated car accident cases. Some of the most common cases that come across our desks include:

Drunk Driving Accidents

Drunk driving is a major problem in the Lowcountry. Drunk drivers are incredibly irresponsible and regularly cause fatal accidents because they drive physically and mentally impaired by alcohol. Drunk drivers have slower reaction times, delayed reflexes, and impaired vision, making them unfit to operate a motor vehicle. In auto wrecks, drunk drivers often come away with minor injuries compared to their victims, which is a bitter pill to swallow

Individuals who make a choice to drive drunk cause accidents by weaving in and out of traffic, going over the speed limit, failing to see pedestrians, and ignoring traffic laws. They may run cars off the road, rear-end vehicles, hit them head-on, or even cause a vehicle to roll over.

Drunk driving accidents in Ridgeland care result in horrible injuries, such as:

  • Burns
  • Broken Bones
  • Head Injuries
  • Brain Trauma
  • Spinal Cord Injuries
  • Soft Tissue Injuries
  • Mental Anguish

If you are injured or have lost a family member due to an impaired or drunk driver, our team of personal injury lawyers in Ridgeland can help. We have extensive experience with car accident cases and can explain your rights in simple, plain terms. It is important to know that you can file a personal injury suit regardless of the criminal case outcome against the drunk driver.

 Law Firm Ridgeland, SC

Rental and RV Accidents

When accidents happen in RVs or rental cars, people are often unsure of their rights. This confusion is understandable since there are additional insurance and legal issues that must be accounted for in these cases.

Fortunately, the lawyers at CHSA Law, LLC, have the experience to help you with complex car accident and RV cases. Attorney Michael Dill worked in the auto insurance industry before becoming an attorney. He also has an undergraduate degree that includes a focus on risk management and insurance. When it comes to rental and RV accidents, we review each client's case with a fine-tooth comb. Once we understand your accident, our team will explain your rights and options in easy-to-understand terms.

If you were involved in an accident while driving an RV or a rental vehicle, you may find that your auto insurance company, the rental car's insurance company, and the other party's insurance carrier will try to deny your claim. Situations like these call for a bold, experienced personal injury attorney in Ridgeland, SC, who isn't afraid of large corporations and insurance groups. We have extensive experience with insurance companies and know how to interpret policies. As your advocate, we will ensure that you receive the coverage and compensation you are entitled to, even if an insurance company says you aren't.

We can help you seek compensation in cases that involve:

  • Injuries from Boating Ac
    cidents
  • Rental Cars Injuries
  • RV Accidents
  • Jet Ski Injuries
  • Golf Cart Injuries
  • Rental cars
  • Boat accidents
  • ATV Accidents

Victims of RV and rental car accidents (as well as their families) may be entitled to compensation for pain and suffering, medical expenses, and lost income or benefits. Our personal injury lawyers work with life-care planners, medical experts, and economists to determine the amount of compensation you will need.

Personal Injury Attorney Ridgeland, SC

Texting While Driving and
Distracted Driving Accidents

We live in a time where just about everyone has their eyes glued to their phones. Often, this happens in situations where the person needs to be paying attention, like when they're driving an automobile. Taking a few moments to glance down at your phone can cause irreparable damage to other drivers. That is why texting while driving is illegal in Ridgeland. Typically, this crime is met with a minor traffic violation. However, when a distracted driver injures another motorist, you can seek compensation through a legal suit. If you have been injured in such a situation, our team can help you hold the negligent driver accountable for your losses and damages.

Texting takes drivers' minds and eyes off the road and their hands off the wheel. Because they are not paying attention to their driving,

They miss crucial road signs and information such as:

  • Changes in the Flow
    of Traffic
  • Traffic Lights
  • Traffic Signs
  • Work Zones
  • Bicyclists
  • Lane Changes
  • Incapacitate Cars and
    Motorists

At CHSA Law, LLC, we represent injury victims in Ridgeland who are involved in all types of car accidents, including distracted driving. We work with vigor to recover the full amount of compensation you and your family will need to recover. You can rely on our attorneys for dedicated, representation throughout your case. Unlike some distracted driving lawyers in Ridgeland, we will assist you with all aspects of your accident, including access to good medical care if needed.

 Personal Injury Lawyer Ridgeland, SC

Unflinching Legal Advocacy. Compassionate Care

At CHSA Law, LLC, we are proud of our commitment to our clients. We pledge to provide them with the highest quality legal representation in Ridgeland and treat them with respect, empathy, and compassion. If you are suffering from the results of a dangerous car accident, know we are here to assist.

We will help you seek compensation for your medical bills, lost wages, pain and suffering, and additional losses. Surviving family members may also recover funeral expenses and compensation for the personal loss of a loved one, including the deceased's future income and benefits. When you or your family's health and financial security are on the line, trust the best choose CHSA Law, LLC.

CONTACT US

Latest News in Ridgeland, SC

Three seeking two Ridgeland council seats, mayor running unopposed

There will be three candidates for two seats in the Nov. 7 election in the Town of Ridgeland. Current Mayor Joey Malphrus will be running unopposed, according to town officials.There will be several precincts open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Election Day.Those voting in the Ridgeland 1, 2, or 3 precincts will cast ballots at the Kingdom Touch Ministries Gymnasium, 6714 Tillman Road in Ridgeland.Those voting in the Grahamville 1 and 2 precincts will vote at the Mt. Carmel Baptist Center Fellowship Hall, 3376 B...

There will be three candidates for two seats in the Nov. 7 election in the Town of Ridgeland. Current Mayor Joey Malphrus will be running unopposed, according to town officials.

There will be several precincts open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Those voting in the Ridgeland 1, 2, or 3 precincts will cast ballots at the Kingdom Touch Ministries Gymnasium, 6714 Tillman Road in Ridgeland.

Those voting in the Grahamville 1 and 2 precincts will vote at the Mt. Carmel Baptist Center Fellowship Hall, 3376 Bees Creek Road in Ridgeland.

Current Town of Ridgeland Mayor Joey Malphrus first took office in 1988 and won two more terms afterward. He resigned in 1999 when he was elected probate judge. He was elected mayor again in 2011 and took office in 2012. He is currently seeking another term unopposed.

Prep for the polls: See who is running for president and compare where they stand on key issues in our Voter Guide

The two seats up for election in the town were vacated following the resignations of council members Chris Dubose and Grady Woods. The two councilmen's seats were up for re-election in November before the two resigned ahead of the election.

Dubose resigned Aug. 1, stating he was moving out of the area. He served for more than 10 years.

Woods, who served for 18 years on council, sent a resignation letter to the town dated Aug. 3. Woods did not provide a specific reason for his resignation. But according to records of a July 11 Beaufort City Council work session, he applied for the Beaufort Historic Review Board. He told Beaufort officials in July that he now resides in the City of Beaufort.

The three candidates filing for the two open council seats are Bill Fishburne, Johnny L. Jackson Jr. and Libby Malphrus.

Fishburne has lived in Ridgeland for the past eight years. He is a general contractor and has operated Coastline Construction Services, LLC for the past 40 years. He has also served as chairman of the Ridgeland Planning Commission for the past five years. He and his wife, Beth, have one son, William.

"I am concerned for Ridgeland and I am running because I believe Ridgeland can be the community those living there remember," Fishburne said. "Growth is inevitable, but we can grow responsibly. We need to have the best tools available to make it community friendly for everyone."

Jackson has been a resident of Ridgeland for more than 50 years and is an insurance agent at Jackson Insurance Agency, LLC.

"If you look at Ridgeland, nothing seems to be getting done," Jackson said. "I am running because there are not many businesses and I want to know how I can help the town to grow. I want to leave the town better than I found it."

Libby Malphrus has been a Ridgeland resident for 20 years and is an assistant program director of the genetic counseling program at the Medical University of South Carolina. Malphrus and current Mayor Joey Malphrus are not related. She and her husband, Deak, have one daughter, Grace. She also serves on the board of directors at Thomas Heyward Academy.

"Jasper County is one of the fastest-growing counties in the state and the housing developments coming in are overwhelming," Malphrus said. "I am running because Ridgeland needs long-term goals, better communication with its citizens and transparency. Social media is a benefit and it could be used to help the town promote its events and any current information. We need to keep the community involved."

Dementia patient left Ridgeland care facility in owner’s car. Family cites security issues

The Beaufort County family of a 67-year-old dementia patient is still reeling after the man managed to leave a Ridgeland hospice facility and drive the company owner’s unlocked car miles down the highway Tuesday afternoon, arriving at his families’ neighborhood confused and disoriented.“It was the best case scenario,” said Olivia Shultz, the patient’s daughter. Her father, who stopped driving after being diagnosed with ...

The Beaufort County family of a 67-year-old dementia patient is still reeling after the man managed to leave a Ridgeland hospice facility and drive the company owner’s unlocked car miles down the highway Tuesday afternoon, arriving at his families’ neighborhood confused and disoriented.

“It was the best case scenario,” said Olivia Shultz, the patient’s daughter. Her father, who stopped driving after being diagnosed with Lewy body dementia in 2021, was uninjured in the incident, she said, and the car did not appear to have crashed on the nearly five-mile route to Sun City.

Even still, Shultz says the situation reflects a security issue at Friends of Caroline Hospice, located off S.C. 170 in Jasper County. Although the family cannot pursue legal action against the facility due to a lack of monetary losses, she says her father’s escape — and the amount of time his absence went unnoticed among staff — is troubling.

“If you know someone has dementia, why wouldn’t you be more on guard?” Shultz told The Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette. She said Tuesday was the first time her father had wandered away from anywhere since his dementia diagnosis more than two years ago.

Lindsay Roberg, the president and CEO of Friends of Caroline Hospice, did not respond to multiple requests for comment.

Shultz dropped her father off at Friends of Caroline just before 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, planning to go shopping on Hilton Head with family before picking him up that evening. They had entrusted him to the facility once before in June, she said.

But around 2:30 that afternoon, Shultz got a call from Bluffton firefighters. Her father was at the Tidewatch Drive gate of Sun City, where the family lives, and appeared not to remember where he was or how he got there. Sun City security initially flagged down the man’s vehicle after noticing his car did not have an entrance decal.

“He wanted to go home, so he walked out the door,” Shultz said.

The car her father used in the attempt to drive home was registered to Roberg, the family soon discovered. The owner’s Forerunner had been left unlocked outside the Friends of Caroline facility with a spare set of keys inside, Shultz said, allowing her father to get inside and drive off.

Roberg later arrived to the scene, claiming her car and apologizing to the family, Shultz said.

The bulk of the family’s questions about Tuesday’s incident remain unanswered — how often their father had been checked on that afternoon, which door of the facility he walked out of, how long he was gone before staff noticed — but Shultz says the incident has damaged their trust in the company. They’ve now started the long process of updating their hospice and respite plans to find new caretakers for her father, she said.

“It was a traumatic experience for us all,” Shultz said. “I woudn’t want anyone else to have that same experience.”

This story was originally published July 23, 2023, 6:00 AM.

Ridgeland Christmas lights show helps raise money for child battling cancer

RIDGELAND, S.C. (WSAV) — It first started as a light show for their children. Now, 26 years later, Chelsea and Barry Brendlen put on a free Christmas display for the Ridgeland community.However, the sparkling lights have a deeper meaning giving a helping hand to a family in need.During the day the lights are hard to see. But as soon as the sun goes down the Brendlen home, with more than 100,000 lights brightens the whole community.Jolly Ole Saint Nick, Mrs. Claus, reindeer, and more all light up to bring in holiday...

RIDGELAND, S.C. (WSAV) — It first started as a light show for their children. Now, 26 years later, Chelsea and Barry Brendlen put on a free Christmas display for the Ridgeland community.

However, the sparkling lights have a deeper meaning giving a helping hand to a family in need.

During the day the lights are hard to see. But as soon as the sun goes down the Brendlen home, with more than 100,000 lights brightens the whole community.

Jolly Ole Saint Nick, Mrs. Claus, reindeer, and more all light up to bring in holiday cheer.

“We started off like everybody, just a few strings of lights here and there for our kids when they were little. And it has grown into this for the community,” Chelsea said.

Beyond the sparkle, the Brendlens hope the lights shine a bit brighter. They’re helping raise money for a family whose four-year-old child, Ravel, is in the biggest fight of her little life.

She’s battling leukemia.

“My son actually came to me this year about wanting to do it for her, that he knows the family and that meant a lot to him to be able to help them out this year,” Chelsea said. “And that’s one of the reasons, too, that we continue to do this, that we’re able to to help a family or families in need each year. It’s pretty important to our family to be able to do that.”

For the past couple of decades, the Brendlen home has become a winter wonderland for Ridgeland families. It takes the couple six to eight weeks to get every light delicately placed around trees and on structures.

“Every year we talk about, well, this might be our last year,” Chelsea said. “It’s a lot of work, but when you hear the kids laughing and pointing at things and the excitement in their eyes and their faces as they’re driving through, that’s the reason that we keep doing this.”

However, it’s not just a light show. There’s hot chocolate, decorating cookies, train rides, and more. All to make sure children and their families have a jolly Christmas.

“If you’re able to leave a donation for our cause that year, that’s wonderful, but definitely not necessary,” Chelsea said. “We just want you to come through and enjoy this with your family. Start a new tradition.

The lights are on display every night from 6 to 10 up until the New Year’s Eve.

TICO sparking industry with EV solution

TICO, located in Ridgeland, SC, is sparking industry with emission-free, electric vehicle (EV) solutionSpecial to Bluffton TodayAt TICO, you can feel the energy pulsing through the plant. It seems….electric.And soon, it will be electric.Terminal Investment Corporation (TICO) began in 1946 as an inter-city bus transportation business by the Booker family in Savannah, Georgia. Over the next seven decades with two generations of family at the helm, the business evolved.In the early 1970...

TICO, located in Ridgeland, SC, is sparking industry with emission-free, electric vehicle (EV) solution

Special to Bluffton Today

At TICO, you can feel the energy pulsing through the plant. It seems….electric.

And soon, it will be electric.

Terminal Investment Corporation (TICO) began in 1946 as an inter-city bus transportation business by the Booker family in Savannah, Georgia. Over the next seven decades with two generations of family at the helm, the business evolved.

In the early 1970s, Randall S. “Randy” Booker, chairman and CEO of TICO, recognized an opportunity and developed a concept through which TICO could own and operate its tractors and lease them for port operations. This would allow the ports to have continually dependable vehicles without the burden of owning and maintaining them. TICO began building tractors to move containers around at the nation's busiest ports.

"This innovation has proved to be a critical aspect in the successes recorded by numerous ports,” according to TICO’s website.

“We are a pretty unique business,” said Mallery Pindar, TICO’s director of sales, marketing and commercial development. “Our products were born out of necessity.”

TICO’s leadership looked for a location and found it in Ridgeland. Booker said recently, “We selected the Ridgeland site in 2004 because we saw long-term value in the rural workforce concept. Today, with the largest private workforce in Jasper County, we are immensely proud of the men and women who drive a culture of safety, quality and productivity.”

In 2008, TICO entered the retail market, selling to businesses and industries that were also in need of specialized vehicles. “The tractors were built by people who not only run them but also understand the customer support side.”

This has led TICO to become the second-largest provider in the industry in a relatively short time, said Pindar. The majority of TICO’s annual production volume is sold through its growing North American dealer network, with the balance of production being National Fleet Accounts and TICO’s internal port operations.

“Our dealer networks are critically important,” said Pindar.

Like electricity, the company isn’t sitting still. “While we are second at the moment, we have a world domination scheme,” he said with a smile.

That includes the introduction of an electric version of their tractors. TICO teamed up with Volvo-Penta to create a new model, the TICO Pro-Spotter Electric.

The Pro-Spotter Electric is an emission-free electric vehicle (EV), powered by Volvo Penta’s electric driveline, according to company promotional documents. “Full battery capacity can be reached in 40 minutes with a 150-kW charger. The design delivers faster acceleration, instant torque, improved efficiency and optimized utilization of energy. Additionally, the Pro-Spotter Electric was designed with the operator in mind for enhanced comfort and a better driving experience.”

“TICO is pairing customers with approved charger vendors so the technology does not restrict the end-user to a proprietary charging solution (unlike some of our competition), rather uses the CCS-1 standard charging protocol for the US,” said Pindar.

Booker added, “Our success in the market validates and drives the capital investments we are committing to future growth. Our team is gearing up to embark on full production of electric trucks in the next successful chapter of TICO Manufacturing.”

The new electric vehicle was showcased on Feb. 27 in Orlando, Florida, at the Transportation and Technology Exhibition. Orders are now being taken.

Daryl Berryman, senior director of engineering, research & development, and quality said, “The demand for electrification is in all the markets and applications we support. It’s the natural evolution of transportation and goods movement. With our partner, Volvo Penta, we’ve developed the best and most efficient EV solution for our customers. The new product has the benefits of eliminated fuel costs, reduced maintenance, and improved uptime.”

Pindar said the move to electric vehicles is four-fold. “First, there is a lot of regulatory pressure and some states are taxing industries to reduce their emissions. Second, some of our customers are leading the charge for sustainability and having a cleaner fleet. Third, there are subsidies being offered to purchase electric vehicles. And fourth, diesel engines are increasingly more complicated and costly to build. If our customers can get great funding and less operating costs, then this an obvious ‘win-win’.”

TICO leadership didn’t want to rush into a new product. “We wanted to hold out for the best solution,” said Pindar. They didn’t want to create a product that was put together piecemeal. They wanted something special that would combine ''TICO’s tractor design with the electric Volvo electrobility technology and driveline.''

The real spark was in 2020 when TICO met with Volvo Penta. Volvo was founded in 1907 and is headquartered in Goteborg, Sweden. Volvo acquired Penta in 1935 and Volvo Penta has been part of the Volvo Group since then. It provides complete power systems to the marine industry, power-generating equipment, and similar industrial applications.

In 2021, TICO and Volvo Penta formed a full partnership. “It has been a transformational partnership,” said Pindar.

“Volvo Penta has a vision to be a leader in sustainable power solutions, and TICO is a very important part of this transformational journey,” said Darren Tasker, vice president of industrial at Volvo Penta North America.

“Partnering with TICO on our project to introduce an emission-free, electric terminal tractor leverages Volvo Group technology and Volvo Penta’s experience and full-system approach to the electric driveline — from development to installation — and TICO’s manufacturing capabilities and extensive customer service and support. We are growing and innovating together to secure market position and achieve a technologically advanced powertrain portfolio.”

“Volvo has proven technology,” said Pindar. “We use all Volvo components plus the support.”

“It is important to know that our trucks are not just being redesigned. This is a proven driveline solution,” said Pindar.

Locally, the new product line is having an impact. “We have beefed up our engineering resources. We’ve had to staff up to build the prototype vehicles. We will have changes in our assembly line – tooling and staff training.”

The expansion of the facility is being determined. “This facility will build about two times as many vehicles in near future as we did this past year,” said Pindar. “We are doubling our production.”

“The high-voltage components will be installed by select, highly-trained employees,” said Pindar.

Currently, there are about 300 employees working at the Ridgeland facility.

“TICO has invested in the people of our region, providing great job opportunities while manufacturing a state-of-the-art vehicle,” said Kay Maxwell, Vice President of SouthernCarolina Alliance, the regional economic development organization representing Jasper County and six other counties. “We are proud of the role that TICO plays in their industry sector, and now we have even more to tout in Jasper County as TICO has brought more innovation to the table in the EV market.”

Jim Grooms, chief operating officer, said, “TICO Manufacturing is excited about adding an Electric Terminal Tractor to our existing lineup of industry-leading products. EV benefits are far-reaching, benefiting the environment and customer operations. Our workforce is energized by the new challenge of building an electric vehicle and to be a part of providing such an important capability to the marketplace.”

"The change has been complex but we are getting there as a team,” said Pindar.

“It’s an exciting time to be on our TICO teams,” he said. “TICO has something special going on. Growth is off the charts. We are a force to be reckoned with in the terminal trucking industry.”

Laura J. McKenzie is a Volunteer In Service To America (VISTA) volunteer with SouthernCarolina Alliance, a 7-county regional development alliance in South Carolina.

Critics slam filthy, crowded Jasper animal shelter as county seeks outside help

National and local animal advocates agreed this week to work with a Jasper County animal rescue group to improve its operations after months of community complaints about overcrowding and poor conditions at the organization’s Ridgeland center.The advocates convened at the Jasper Animal Rescue Mission on Monday afternoon, walking through the county-owned building and suggesting fixes for a safer, more sanitary facility for the 300-plus animals, volunteers and employees. The meeting was organized by Jasper County officials....

National and local animal advocates agreed this week to work with a Jasper County animal rescue group to improve its operations after months of community complaints about overcrowding and poor conditions at the organization’s Ridgeland center.

The advocates convened at the Jasper Animal Rescue Mission on Monday afternoon, walking through the county-owned building and suggesting fixes for a safer, more sanitary facility for the 300-plus animals, volunteers and employees. The meeting was organized by Jasper County officials.

For months, volunteers and former rescue mission board members pushed Jasper County to address concerns about the shelter. Volunteers and former board members told the Island Packet and Beaufort Gazette that dogs and cats are left in their own feces, cages are stacked three-to-four high, water bowls are full of algae, and soiled laundry is piled feet-high. They describe the building as “unsafe” for workers and animals, with a rat infestation.

During a July Jasper County Council meeting, Jeanne Francisco — speaking on behalf of the group pushing for change at the rescue mission — presented photos of the group’s facility to council members and detailed what the group says is the building’s unsanitary conditions.

“Safety is our No. 1 priority,” Francisco told council members. “Right now, the safety of the staff, the volunteers, potential adopters, visitors inside and outside this county is in jeopardy.”

She asked the council for help to address the facility’s problems. The mission leases the county-owned building for $1 annually.

Rose Dobson-Elliot, the county’s director of engineering services, said Monday she hoped shelter staff takes advantage of the resources offered. Dobson-Elliot was tasked with handling complaints about the rescue mission.

Among those assessing the mission on Monday was Steve Carriere, Florida State Animal Response Coalition manager. He said the issues identified could be remedied, and he offered temporary volunteer help, suggestions for sanitation and sick animal isolation, and training for the mission’s staff.

Officials of the Hilton Head Humane Association and Beaufort County Animal Services provided advice on tackling the overcrowding that the rescue mission’s executive director, Caitlyn Schake, said has been unavoidable because she cannot turn away cats and dogs brought in by county animal control officers.

“It’s time to fix this before it gets worse,” Carriere said.

On Monday afternoon, over 100 dogs were housed in wire cages or crates outside or in the back of the building, and smaller dogs’ crates were stacked atop each other. Boxes of scooped feces sat outside several of the larger cages. A few of the dogs darted inside a fenced area that was strewn with toys and debris.

An estimated 150-200 cats were spread across the property and facility. Some lounged in beds, others freely walked outside or leapt onto roofs, and dozens were inside the building, with some sectioned off into smaller rooms.

Toward the front of the building — its hallway lined with filled dog crates — food bags, blankets and other donations were piled high. In the back, soiled laundry was heaped near the washer and dryer.

Schake, who’s been at the helm for nine years, said a shortage of staff and resources makes it difficult to keep up with the bursting population while also consistently deep-cleaning parts of the building and creating barriers between sick and well animals. A rescue mission worker estimated seven staff members are at work on a normal day.

On a typical day, the mission will get between two and 15 animals, Schake said. Anywhere from zero to eight animals leave the facility in a day. Currently there is no set animal capacity for the mission.

“How many volunteers would you need?” Carriere asked Schake. She estimated five, and Carriere said it was possible to provide her with that temporary help.

In October, six of the mission’s board members resigned, according to a former board member.

Robin Artz, a former vice president of the board who left during the summer, said in a resignation email that the board was not holding themselves “accountable to the animals.” Artz described conditions that included water leaking through the floor and ceiling, mold, and rats. Further, Artz detailed animals in crates upon crates upon crates — “they need space to run and not sit in a 4x2 crate up on another crate,” she wrote.

“Conditions of the shelter are horrendous to say the least,” Artz’s July email read. “There are volunteers, mostly elderly individuals who are putting their health at risk by giving of their time. Most importantly, we are putting our own employees and animals at risk for disease, illness or worse. WE [sic] owe the humans that help us and the animals more.”

Along with a shortage of staff, Schake said Monday the mission’s financial resources were less than its Beaufort County counterpart. According to its most recent 990 tax form, the mission’s revenue was $457,000 in 2022, with expenses at $460,000. Dobson-Elliot said the county contributed $185,000 that year. The nearly half-million in funds is meager compared to the Hilton Head Humane Association, which raked in over $3 million in 2021, according to its most recent 990 tax form.

Beaufort County, with 191,748 people, is also much larger than Jasper, which has 30,324 residents, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

To increase funding, Carriere advised accepting any donation large or small and applying for grant funding. Local animal advocates suggested pushing for support at county council meetings and holding fundraisers to better engage the community.

Dobson-Elliot said she would work with county animal control to ensure the mission had “breathing room” to work to keep its animal population down.

While she could not provide an immediate timeline for when to re-assess the mission’s conditions and the steps to take from there, Carriere said if the shelter staff embraces his suggestions and accepts the temporary volunteer help, changes are typically seen within three to four weeks.

This story was originally published November 15, 2023, 9:30 AM.

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