Probate Lawyer in Daniel Island, SC

About The CDH Law Firm Difference

As seasoned probate lawyers in South Carolina, we understand that Estate Administration often involves sensitive family dynamics as much as it does the legal minutia involved in probate law. After all, a person's estate not only affects their generation but the generations that follow.

But when your loved one passes, their assets must be managed and distributed correctly. When mismanaged, disputes often arise between parties like the Beneficiaries, Trustees, Heirs, or Executors of a Will. Even when everything is managed the right way, arguments and misunderstandings can still occur, and even evolve into bitter legal battles necessitating probate litigation.

It stands to reason, then, that you should hire a probate lawyer in Daniel Island, SC to help. But the truth is, many attorneys don't have vast experience with probate and trust work. If they do, they aren't usually seasoned trial attorneys. That's what separates probate attorneys at CHSA Law, LLC from others - we have the ability to help plan your Estate and litigate estate disputes if they arise.

We are keenly familiar with local probate judges, courtroom staff members, and the related procedures involved with South Carolina probate law. Our intimate knowledge and experience help us successfully navigate the probate process to complete our client's cases quickly and efficiently.

But that's just one aspect that sets CDH apart from other firms. Understanding the importance of personalized attention, we also make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship. We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values.

Moreover, trust is one of the most important aspects of the attorney-client relationship. We work to create an open, friendly environment in which you can feel comfortable. After years of experience, we boast the skill and experience necessary to earn that trust - and that's a priceless commodity when it comes to probate cases in South Carolina.

Understanding The Probate Process in South Carolina

When a loved one passes away, it's natural to go through a time of emotional adjustment. However, it's crucial for the family of the loved one to face the financial realities of their estate. That reality includes the probate process, which involves distributing assets and settling the estate. A probate attorney in Daniel Island, SC is often recommended to assist during this time. This process isn't just recommended - it's often a legal responsibility in South Carolina.

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Steps to the Probate Process in South Carolina

01

Delivery of Will Upon Death: During probate, the first step involves having a will delivered to an Estate Administrator or to the probate court. The deadline to accomplish this task is 30 days.

02

A Personal Representative is Assigned: This individual is often named in a Will and should be appointed officially by the court.

03

A Notice is Sent to Intestate Heirs: If these heirs feel that they should inherit, they have a right to challenge this step.

04

The Estate is Inventoried and Appraised: This process must occur within 90 days of opening an estate. In some estates with valuables like jewelry, art, and property, professional appraisers may be needed.

05

Settling Accounts: During this step, the estate must pay any applicable taxes, ongoing expenses, or outstanding debts. Should the estate not have enough money to pay these debts, creditors must be paid according to South Carolina code.

06

Distributions: If there is money in the estate after debts are paid, those funds are given to heirs of the estate, according to the Will or the State.

07

Discharge: As soon as any claims are paid, the personal representative of the estate will file documents to close the estate. To make this official, the court will issue a Certificate of Discharge.

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Avoiding Probate in South Carolina

Though most estates in South Carolina must go through probate, it is possible to avoid. This happens when a decedent's assets are placed in a Living Trust prior to their death. In this scenario, beneficiaries must be designated in order to inherit the estate. Suppose there are funds that have been promised to beneficiaries via life insurance policies or bank accounts with "payable upon death" designations. In that case, those funds do not have to go through probate.

Assets subject to probate in South Carolina include:

  • Interest in an LLC, Partnership, or Corporation
  • Real Estate Held as a Tenant in Common
  • Property Held in Only the Deceased's Name
 Probate Attorney Daniel Island, SC
Probate Lawyer Daniel Island, SC

Assets that are not subject to probate in South Carolina include:

  • Assets Placed in a Trust
  • Assets Which Are Already Tied to a Beneficiary
  • Pension Plan Assets
  • Insurance Policies with Beneficiaries
  • Beneficiaries of Retirement Funds
  • Real Estate or Property with Right of Survivorship
  • Real Estate or Property with Joint Tenancy
  • Accounts That Are Transferable or Payable Upon Death
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Avoiding Probate: Yes or No?

Though it's not always possible, some families go out of their way to avoid the probate process in South Carolina. Doing so can help save money in the long run and also expedite the distribution of funds to heirs. By avoiding probate, you're also keeping personal matters private.

Because every person has different estate and probate complexities, it's hard to say whether avoiding probate is good or bad. Whether or not you should avoid probate depends on your unique situation. As a general rule, it's always best to consult with a probate lawyer in Daniel Island, SC, for honest feedback and probate assistance.

Typically, having a Living Trust or a Will in place will make transferring assets easier. A little prep ahead of time will make a world of difference when your loved one passes away. After all, nobody is ever prepared for a relative or family friend's death, but a compassionate, trustworthy probate attorney can make the process easier.

FAQsSouth Carolina Probate FAQs

For many families, "Probate" is a dirty term that involves heartbreak and headaches. And while the probate process in South Carolina can be complex and stressful, having answers to some of the most common probate questions can help put your mind at ease.

Q.

My family member recently passed away, and we're considering their estate. How long will the probate process take?

A.

The time it takes an estate to go through probate in South Carolina varies depending on a number of questions, including:

  • Does the deceased have a valid will?
  • Is the Estate complex or large?
  • Is the Will contested?
  • Have any lawsuits been filed?
  • Is the personal representative of the estate efficient?

When conditions are good, a small or simple estate usually takes about a year to close. More complicated estates may take longer.


Q.

My loved one mentioned opening a Trust to protect my assets. What is a Trust, and what Trusts should I consider?

A.

As is the case with most probate decisions, opening a Trust should be based on your unique situation and guidance from your probate attorney in Daniel Island, SC. With that said, a Trust is meant to hold property for your loved one's benefit. When a Trust is created, assets are transferred into the said Trust and managed accordingly. Though there is a common misconception that Trusts are reserved for the wealthy, just about any family can benefit from opening a Trust.

The most common types of Trusts used in probate include:

  • Living Trust: These trusts are opened and controlled by you while you're still living. When you pass away, the assets in the trust are distributed to the beneficiaries you choose. Typically, these trusts do not go through the probate process.
  • Testamentary Trust: These trusts are usually established after you pass away and are included in your will. These trusts must go through the probate process in South Carolina, though they allow for the distribution of property within a certain time frame.
  • Special Needs Trust: This type of trust gives financial support to your loved one if they are disabled.

When conditions are good, a small or simple estate usually takes about a year to close. More complicated estates may take longer.


Q.

What happens when somebody dies without a will in South Carolina?

A.

When a person passes away without a Will in South Carolina, the state decides who gets their decedent's assets. This is also called passing intestate. When this happens, usually only spouses, blood relatives, or registered domestic partners can inherit property according to intestate succession laws.

Relatives who receive the probate property of the deceased are usually chosen in the following order:

  • Living Spouse
  • Children or Grandchildren
  • Parents
  • Brothers or Sisters
  • Grandparents
  • Uncles and Aunts
  • Extended Family

If you're in need of a veteran probate lawyer in South Carolina, look no further than CDH Law Firm. With years of experience in Estate Administration and probate cases, our team is ready to serve you with excellence and protect your interests. Have additional questions? We're here to help. Contact our office today to learn more about Estate Administration in South Carolina.

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Law is complicate matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

A Caring, Confident Approach to Probate in South Carolina

Planning your estate is the first step to take if you want to protect your family, your assets, your well-being, and the fruits of your hard work.

At CHSA Law, LLC, our team of experienced probate lawyers in Daniel Island, SC, can help you navigate the entire Estate Administration process. Through creative legal strategies and a clear understanding of your goals and desires, we work together to make your asset and estate visions a reality. It's never too early to get your estate in order. In fact, estate planning is important for everyone, whether you're single or married, young or old, with or without children. If you're ready to protect your assets and be prepared for probate, contact CHSA Law, LLC, today.

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Latest News in Daniel Island, SC

Popular Charleston eatery bringing smashburgers and more to Daniel Island this summer

DANIEL ISLAND — When John and Brenda Haire first moved to South Carolina in 2009, they lived on Daniel Island. Fifteen years later, the couple will open a restaurant in this part of Charleston, one of the fastest growing in the area.Taking over the space that for the last 22 years housed ...

DANIEL ISLAND — When John and Brenda Haire first moved to South Carolina in 2009, they lived on Daniel Island. Fifteen years later, the couple will open a restaurant in this part of Charleston, one of the fastest growing in the area.

Taking over the space that for the last 22 years housed Laura Alberts Tasteful Options, Heavy’s Barburger will open this summer, John Haire told The Post and Courier. The Haires finalized the purchase of the building at 891 Island Park Drive just three days after Laura Alberts permanently closed on March 15.

“Our friend base is still centered here on Daniel Island,” John Haire said. “I think it’s ready for something like us.”

Heavy’s original location opened in 2022 in the 1137 Morrison Drive space previously occupied by The Tattooed Moose. It’s named after John Haire’s grandfather, who was fondly referred to as "Heavy" by family members and friends in his hometown in Florida.

Heavy’s menu features chicken wings, a chili dog, crinkle-cut french fries and the restaurant’s namesake burger featuring two smashed patties, American cheese, sliced tomato, red onion, lettuce, pickles and “Heavy’s sauce.” The Daniel Island menu will mirror that of the original with a few new additions, Haire said.

A restaurant that opened with an Indian menu of tandoori masala-spiced quail and country captain tikka has changed its culinary tune under new executive chef Damian Sandoval.

Born in Mexico and raised in Chicago, the former Xiao Bao Biscuit and Obstinate Daughter chef’s recently launched offering is billed as “modern American.”

Like many of the country’s top restaurants claiming that same style, Coterie now relies on a mashup of global cuisines at 17 Warren St., where Italian restaurant Pan e Vino previously served.

There are pork-filled wontons charged by a spicy soy glaze, and scallop ceviche with serrano chiles, lime, orange, radish, tarragon and a heavy hit of fennel. Mashed potatoes — served underneath jaggery- and tamari-sauced steak — are infused with kimchi Sandoval makes in-house.

Paired with owner Jeremy Buck’s inventive cocktail menu, Coterie 2.0 is all over the map. In this case, that’s the intended approach.

When Buck and his wife, Jital Vaghela, first opened Coterie, they teamed up with Viraj Borkar to create a menu that bridged Indian and Southern cuisine. The one-time Rasika culinary director developed recipes for appam, paratha and other Indian-inspired plates that multiple Coterie chefs executed over three years at the Charleston restaurant.

Issues with the menu didn’t lead to the recent change, Buck said. It was Sandoval, who Buck and Vaghela invited into Coterie to prepare a few dishes one day last summer.

During the restaurant’s version of a job interview, Sandoval riffed on three Coterie classics, showcasing the finesse of a chef who cooked in prestigious Chicago kitchens like North Pond before coming to the Holy City. The two Mexican street food bites he served gave the Coterie owners a glimpse at Sandoval’s culinary perspective.

“We basically decided right there,” Buck said.

The couple didn’t just give Sandoval the job; they offered him the freedom to build his own menu, which the restaurant unveiled in January.

With shareable small and large plates, sides and desserts, Coterie specializes in options like rice noodles with five spice caramel sauce and a baby kale, radish and turnip salad, placed on bread like a souped-up avocado toast. Smoked feta lends creamy, earthy notes to the sourdough toast, which shares the crumbled Mediterranean cheese with another colorful Coterie plate.

Huaraches — prevalent in Mexico but rarely served at Mexican restaurants in the U.S. — consist of flat, oval-shaped masa and a layer of toppings. The shape is meant to mimic the sole of a Mexican sandal, or huarache.

Sandoval makes his own, mixing heirloom corn flour with salt and a blend of oils to make the huarache base, which rests for 30 minutes before being rolled into the sandal shape.

He trades the traditional topping of beans, meat and salsa for a combination of smoked feta, crispy rice noodles and chicken that’s shredded and paired with chipotles to make what’s called tinga. It’s served with sambal, crafted with the same Fresno chiles that add a bright pop of color as a garnish topping the mildly spiced fork-and-knife dish.

The flight from Mexico to Asia is a short one at Coterie, where curry — a staple of not just Indian food but also Jamaican, Sri Lankan, Pakistani, Malaysian and other global cuisines — still finds its way onto the menu.

Those who dine inside or, better yet, on Coterie’s outdoor oasis of a patio might find themselves with a forkful of palak lamb one moment and a pile of Thai-influenced pork belly yellow curry the next. The latter had us scooping up spoonful after spoonful of soft white rice, cooked so that each grain holds its form while soaking up the fragrant coconut milk-fattened sauce.

Food

When Coterie opened in 2021, Buck said the restaurant’s name — defined as a small group of people with shared interests — would drive the concept. He wanted the space, which operates as pop-up coffee shop Idle Hands during the day, to constantly evolve and “have a lot of influences in one place,” he told me after the opening.

With Mexican, Korean, Indian, Thai, Latin American and other cuisines dotting the menu, that ethos holds true today, one of the reasons Buck did not feel the need to change the restaurant’s name when Sandoval took over.

Some diners might expect to find traditional steaks, pastas and potatoes when they see that Coterie is a “modern American” restaurant; not ribs with chamoy, Chinese broccoli and cardamom vanilla cake. But this melting pot of flavors is American to Sandoval, an immigrant chef who grew up in a large, diverse U.S. city.

“It’s nice to just have that diversity on the same table,” said Sandoval, who has worked in restaurants since he was 17. “I think it’s fun for people.”

Coterie opens for dinner at 5 p.m. daily. For more information, visit coteriechs.com.

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Daniel Island students use their voices to bring change to their school

DANIEL ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Berkeley County Council allocated $100,000 to Daniel Island School and it’s all thanks to a group of students advocating for their classmates.When eighth-grader Emily Hughes was elected as student council president, she knew she wanted to make a difference at her school. She said in years past, student council members were not able to turn their ideas into a reality, but she wanted to change that.“This year I think we can actually get something and get it done,” Hughes said....

DANIEL ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Berkeley County Council allocated $100,000 to Daniel Island School and it’s all thanks to a group of students advocating for their classmates.

When eighth-grader Emily Hughes was elected as student council president, she knew she wanted to make a difference at her school. She said in years past, student council members were not able to turn their ideas into a reality, but she wanted to change that.

“This year I think we can actually get something and get it done,” Hughes said.

With the help of sixth-grade vice president Keegan McGivern and fifth-grade members Sara Whitley and Olive Abney, they were able to do just that. The student council got together and jotted down ideas that they wanted to implicate. Hughes said that Abney noticed a classmate who was unable to use the playground equipment at recess due to a physical disability, so he spent his recess reading inside. Hughes said it saddened her that recess was not something he enjoyed in the same way she was able to.

“It was upsetting because we could all use it. I loved playgrounds, like my whole life. And whenever other students can’t enjoy it the same way, we just want them to be included too,” she said.

Together, the student council decided that they wanted to create an inclusive playground. They knew this would be an expensive endeavor, so they first teamed up with their school’s Beta Club members to host a Valentine’s Day-themed fundraiser. Through that, they were able to raise $588, but these students were ambitious. They wanted to take it a step further.

The students got together again to propose a letter to Berkeley County Council. Less than a week after the letter was submitted, the council invited the students to speak at Monday’s council meeting.

“It all happened really fast,” Hughes said.

Hughes took to the podium to share their ideas with the council members. She told them how they didn’t want any students to be left out at recess anymore. District 2 Councilman and Finance Committee Chair Josh Whitley made a motion to allocate $100,000 to the school to get this new, accessible equipment. The motion passed unanimously, and the students received high praise from Berkeley County Supervisor Johnny Cribb for their efforts.

“We were all so amazed and excited. It was really exciting and fun,” Hughes said with a grin on her face.

The students’ principals and staff could not have been prouder. The actions of these students hit home for Assistant Principal Jay Burnsworth.

“The biggest thing for me is, and it makes me really emotional in a lot of ways, is that my own son has special needs. And at the end of the day, these kids are doing it for everyone, for the community - not just Daniel Island School, but everyone,” Burnsworth said. “As a father, as an administrator, friend, dad, everybody, I’m just really proud of these kids.”

Once the playground is open, it will be open to the entire community, not just the students of the school.

Burnsworth was not the only one beaming with pride for these four kids. Principal Laura Blanchard shared her praises.

“We just thought it was great that our students recognized that need and wanted all of their friends to be able to play alongside them to the point that they would take action in the way that they did,” she said.

Blanchard and Burnsworth think that the playground will be an incredible physical reminder to the children, for many years to come, that they were able to make a difference.

“It’s really neat to see them empowered in that way. And it’s such a good and positive way,” Blanchard said.

She shared that this was a wonderful learning experience for these kids.

“They learned from the adults in their community that they have a voice. And that we are going to come alongside them and help put feet to their dreams,” Blanchard said.

Blanchard and Burnsworth said that they are already working on initiating the process. They emphasized that they want the students to be fully involved every step of the way. While they are working on the design process, they plan to take the students to different accessible playgrounds in the area so that they can get some ideas. Blanchard said that this is the children’s space, and she wants it to be representative of them, so they should be the ones to decide what is needed.

Hughes expressed some ideas she already had. She said that she would love to have rubber flooring to make wheelchair access easier. She would also love to have wheelchair-accessible swings put in. They also plan to add a sensory garden to the community garden that already exists.

Hughes said she is excited about the next steps.

“We all thought there was space to grow in this area,” she said. “This is something important that needs to happen. So, it was worth it.”

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Clements Ferry projects move through TRC

This week there are several developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as results, if any, from the prior week’s items specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.UPCOMING: CITY OF CHARLESTON TECHNICAL REVIEW COMMITTEEJan. 18: TOWNE AT COOPER RIVER PHASE II (ROAD AND INFRASTRUCTURE) – Three items: Development plan and road improvement to Enterprise ...

This week there are several developments coming before the various City of Charleston boards and committees. Below are those items as well as results, if any, from the prior week’s items specific to Daniel Island and the Cainhoy area. More detailed agendas and results can be found at charleston-sc.gov/agendacenter.

UPCOMING: CITY OF CHARLESTON TECHNICAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

Jan. 18: TOWNE AT COOPER RIVER PHASE II (ROAD AND INFRASTRUCTURE) – Three items: Development plan and road improvement to Enterprise Blvd., Beresford Run, and Clements Ferry Rd. and preliminary plat for infrastructure to serve Towne at Cooper River Master Development on 30 acres at 2620 Clements Ferry Road. TMS: B2710001035. Owner: Cato Holdings LLC. Applicant: Seamon, Whiteside & Associates, Inc. Contact: Spencer Plowden, splowden@seamonwhiteside.com

Jan 18: WOODFIELD COOPER RIVER FARMS 2 – Site plan for a 71-unit multifamily development on 2.7 acres at 700 Silo Acres Dr. TMS: B2710001035. Owner: Woodfield Acquistions LLC. Applicant: Seamon, Whiteside & Associates, Inc. Contact: Malcolm Glenn, mglenn@seamonwhi teside.com.

Jan 18: #7. WOODFIELD POINT HOPE 3 MIXED USE – Site plan for 336 multifamily units, 12 townhome units, 18,000 sf. of retail buildings and 4,000 sf leasing office on 44.6 acres at 1000 Waterline St. TMS: B2620000028. Owner: Thomas Webster, Woodfield Development. Applicant: Seamon, Whiteside & Associates, Inc. Contact: Malcolm Glenn, mglenn@seamon whiteside.com.

RESULTS: CITY OF CHARLESTON TECHNICAL REVIEW COMMITTEE

Jan. 11: Tuxbury Farm Tract (4th review) – Concept plan for 83 mixed-use lots at 2682 Hwy 41 & 698 Tuxbury Farm Road for 58 townhomes and 25 single-family lots on 15.10 acres. TMS: 2630004006. Owner: Tuxbury Equestrian Center. Applicant: Toll Brothers. Contact: Mark Fields, mfields1@tollbrothers.com. Results: Open pending delivery of Stormwater comments.

Jan. 11: Cainhoy Del Webb Phase 2 (4th review) – Preliminary plat and road construction plans for 233 single-family residences on 129.9 acres in Cainhoy. TMS: B2620000028. Owner: Pulte Home Company. Applicant: Thomas & Hutton Engineering. Contact: Steven Roach, roach.s@tandh.com. Results: Open pending delivery of Stormwater comments.

Jan. 11: Foundation Place at Point Hope Phase 1(1st review) – Site plan for 8,487 sq. ft. commercial building on 4.35 acres at 846 Foundation St., Cainhoy. TMS: B26200000063. Owner: Vulcan Property Group. Applicant: Barrier Island SC, LLC. Contact: Andrew Bajoczky, andy@barrieris landng.com. Results: Revise and return.

Jan. 11: Daniel Island Drive Hotel (3rd review) - Site plan for 38-room hotel, event space, and hotel restaurant on 1.55 acres at 1996 Daniel Island Drive. TMS: B2750000080. Owner: JT Industries LLC. Applicant: Seamon, Whiteside & Associates, Inc. Contact: Malcolm Glenn, mglenn@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Revise and return.

Jan. 11: Kings Cross Church (pre-app) - Site plan for building addition with parking at 2011 Clements Ferry Road. TMS: B2680000120. Owner: Kings Cross Church. Applicant: Sitecast, LLC. Contact: Jacob Cordray, jcordray@sitecastsc.com. Results: Revise and return.

Jan. 11: MARSHES AT DANIEL ISLAND PHASE 2 (3rd review) - Preliminary plat and road construction plans 26 single-family lots on 4.9 acres at 146 UT Fairbanks Drive. TMS: B2710000010. Owner: Marla DeCriscio | Stanley Martin Homes, LLC. Applicant: Seamon, Whiteside & Associates, Inc. Contact: Zachary Wortman, zwortman@seamonwhiteside.com. Results: Revise and return.

RESULTS: CITY OF CHARLESTON DESIGN REVIEW BOARD

Jan. 16: 211 Seven Farms Dr. – Conceptual approval for a new three-story mixed-use building over parking at 211 Seven Farms. Dr. TMS: 301-00-00-805. Owner: SLS Development. Applicant: The Middleton Group. Results: Not available at press time.

REULTS: CITY OF CHARLESTON PLANNING COMMISION

Jan. 17: Tuxbury Farm Tract – Subdivision approval for 83 mixed-use lots at 2682 Hwy 41 & 698 Tuxbury Farm Rd for 58 townhomes and 25 single-family lots on 15.10 acres. TMS: 2630004006, 007, 042, 046 & 053. Owner: Rumph Auto Service, et al., J. Ray Waits, & Tuxbury Equestrian Center. Applicant: Toll Brothers. Results: Deferred.

Editorial: A promising park project takes shape in southern Berkeley County

The actions of no fewer than three arms of state and local governments seem to be jelling nicely to turn prime riverfront real estate on Daniel Island's western edge into an exciting new public space. It's still early, and success is not guaranteed, so all involved, particularly Berkeley County and the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, need to get the details right as they look to create what could be the region's premier riverfront park of the early 21st century.Last summer, Berkeley County Council voted to buy severa...

The actions of no fewer than three arms of state and local governments seem to be jelling nicely to turn prime riverfront real estate on Daniel Island's western edge into an exciting new public space. It's still early, and success is not guaranteed, so all involved, particularly Berkeley County and the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism, need to get the details right as they look to create what could be the region's premier riverfront park of the early 21st century.

Last summer, Berkeley County Council voted to buy several parcels commonly known as North Island from the State Ports Authority, which has been looking to rid itself of landholdings that it no longer expects to need for port operations. The state agency acquired substantial tracts on Daniel Island two decades ago in an unsuccessful effort to build a new container terminal there, and it has moved slowly since to sell off that land.

County Council should finish its due diligence period and close on the property soon. The sale was made possible in part by Berkeley voters agreeing to a sales tax referendum that dedicated a small slice of funding for greenbelt projects, such as land conservation and parks. North Island would be the county's first greenbelt purchase using those funds, and it would come before the county actually has established a plan or an advisory board.

Even though the master plan has not been completed — which is not ideal — the purchase still looks like a wise strategic move, one that should help the county show voters that their money is being used effectively and efficiently on meaningful projects.

North Island offers a great location, between the terminus of Seven Farms Drive and the Cooper River, an area nearby residents have been advocating for a park for years. The site has no road access, but it could obtain that through an extension of Seven Farms. And this looks like a very good deal for taxpayers: The $4 million purchase price is about one-tenth of what the property is valued at for tax purposes.

Equally important, the county plans to pay only about half of the purchase price with its greenbelt money. The rest would come from a $1 million S.C. Conservation Bank contribution, and the county hopes to obtain another $1 million through grants, according to reporter David Wren. Such leveraging of the county's dollars is important and sets a solid precedent for future greenbelt deals, which also should attract outside money for conservation work.

The county's land deal is only a piece of what's going on here. Just to the south, the Ports Authority also has leased about 40 acres to the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism for public use. We urge this state and county to cooperate closely in the months to come. South of that potential park site, the Ports Authority also has worked since 2016 to create a saltwater wetlands mitigation bank; last month, it agreed to place 135 acres into a conservation easement with the Lord Berkeley Land Trust. Ultimately, those restored wetlands would complement any new park to the north.

Mark Messersmith, the SPA's environmental manager, told Mr. Wren that the three projects represent "a huge positive for the region," adding, "It's like 2½ miles of shoreline that would, in one form or another, be protected from large-scale development. ... It's almost unheard of to have that much protected land basically in an industrial part of a metropolitan area."

He's right. And while Berkeley looks to make a wise play on Daniel Island, it must ensure that, going forward, its new greenbelt program balances the interests across the county, from those in urbanizing areas such as Daniel Island, Hanahan and Goose Creek to those in rural areas that will need increased attention and protection, too.

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Bridge replacement project on time with no delays, say city officials

The Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project is proceeding on schedule with an anticipated completed date in April 2024, according to the city website and statements from city officials.Construction, which began on Aug. 15, 2023, was expected to take nine months to complete.An April completion date puts it within the nine-month construction timeframe, despite contractors encountering a couple of unexpected utility challenges.The most recent challenge involved the underground location of pre-existing water lines....

The Beresford Creek Bridge replacement project is proceeding on schedule with an anticipated completed date in April 2024, according to the city website and statements from city officials.

Construction, which began on Aug. 15, 2023, was expected to take nine months to complete.

An April completion date puts it within the nine-month construction timeframe, despite contractors encountering a couple of unexpected utility challenges.

The most recent challenge involved the underground location of pre-existing water lines.

During construction, the contractor discovered the line, which is buried beneath the creek bed, was not installed where the plans showed.

City Councilman Boyd Gregg explained that the project engineer, Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson (JMT), Inc., designed the bridge pilings to avoid the water line based on plans from when the line was installed, which he estimated to have been laid some 30 years ago.

Gregg said that despite the discrepancy between planned and actual, the contractor was able to drive the pilings and the project was not delayed.

Rob Williams, the city of Charleston Site Development Manager, confirmed there are no delays on the project.

Another previous utility issue arose in September when the gas main needed to be extended about 421 feet.

“This alteration is in response to a nearby commercial building expressing interest in accessing natural gas,” said Virginia Jones, senior project manager at Dominion Energy.

Neither the waterline nor gas line changes slowed the progress of the bridge replacement, according to city officials.

The bridge has been closed to pedestrian and vehicle traffic since Cape Romain Contractors began construction in August 2023. The closure leaves only the two I-526 ramps as options for access to the island by auto. The new bridge will feature two travel lanes along with a multi-use path on one side.

The project’s aim is to lessen traffic and provide a safer crossing for commuters.

According to the city’s January project update, significant milestones have been achieved since the last update in November.

Those milestones include the completion of all piles, the formation and setting of the rebar cage pile cap known as EB4, and the ongoing process of laying decking for Spans A and B.

“It was thought that a valve would need to be installed prior to driving the final piling for End Bent EB4,” Williams said. “However, the contractor was able to drive the pile without installing the valve and it all got worked out.”

Stay up to date with the bridge replacement project via the city of Charleston’s website at charleston-sc.gov/2637/Beresford-Creek-Bridge-Replacement.

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