Termite Lawyer in Fingerville, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Fingerville, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Fingerville, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Fingerville, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Fingerville, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Fingerville, SC

Latest News in Fingerville, SC

Man Said ‘Witches’ Told Him to Throw ‘Pitbull-type Canine’ Off of a Bridge in South Carolina, Authorities Say

A dog is alive but “clearly” shaken up after a man allegedly threw the canine off a bridge to fall dozens of feet — twice.Authorities in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, identified the defendant as Shannon Lee Cantrell, 43, and allege that he committed the offense in plain view.“On Monday, October 3, 2022, Spartanburg County Environmental Enforcement Officers responded to a call of someone tossing a dog from a bridge located on Highway 11 in the Fingerville area of Spartanburg County,...

A dog is alive but “clearly” shaken up after a man allegedly threw the canine off a bridge to fall dozens of feet — twice.

Authorities in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, identified the defendant as Shannon Lee Cantrell, 43, and allege that he committed the offense in plain view.

“On Monday, October 3, 2022, Spartanburg County Environmental Enforcement Officers responded to a call of someone tossing a dog from a bridge located on Highway 11 in the Fingerville area of Spartanburg County,” the county wrote.

Officers said they spoke with a witness at the site and searched the area below the bridge. They claimed to find Cantrell putting the dog in a chokehold.

“Officers removed the male, brown-and-white pitbull-type canine,” authorities said. “Cantrell stated that ‘witches’ told him to throw the dog from the bridge. The dog was thrown twice. Cantrell told officers that he was the owner of the canine and released ownership to Spartanburg County.”

Officers said they measured the distance from the bridge to the ground. It was 34 feet, authorities said.

The 1-year-old dog was wet from being in the water below, but did not have any visible injuries, police said.

“However, the canine was clearly shaken by the incident and was transported to Greenville County Animal Care for assessment,” authorities said.

The county said Environmental Enforcement got an arrest warrant under the law for ill treatment of animals — state statute 47-1-40 (B):

(B) A person who tortures, torments, needlessly mutilates, cruelly kills, or inflicts excessive or repeated unnecessary pain or suffering upon an animal or by omission or commission causes these acts to be done, is guilty of a felony and, upon conviction, must be punished by imprisonment of not less than one hundred eighty days and not to exceed five years and by a fine of five thousand dollars.

Cantrell was taken to the Spartanburg County Detention Center, where he remains locked up under a $5,000 bond. He faces a count of animal cruelty.

[Images via Spartanburg County]

Have a tip we should know? tips@lawandcrime.com

Here's what was found in seven Spartanburg area public drinking water systems

The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, issued its 2021 Tap Water Database that shows what contaminants are commonly detected in trace amounts in public drinking water sources nationwide and in South Carolina.Here is a brief look at each of the seven water systems in Spartanburg County and what Environmental Working Group found from April 2019 to March 2021. A link is available explaining...

The Environmental Working Group (EWG), a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit, issued its 2021 Tap Water Database that shows what contaminants are commonly detected in trace amounts in public drinking water sources nationwide and in South Carolina.

Here is a brief look at each of the seven water systems in Spartanburg County and what Environmental Working Group found from April 2019 to March 2021. A link is available explaining the contaminants for each system.

? Inman Campobello, Inman, serves: 33,176; no violations; 19 contaminants detected; 16 at trace levels with no federal standard. Three below legal limits were Haloacetic acids (HAA5), 29.8 ppb, legal limit, 60 ppb; Total Trihalomethanes, 39.8 ppb, legal limit, 80 ppb; Chromium, 0.226 ppb, legal limit 100 ppb.

From April 2019 to March 2021, Inman Campobello WD complied with health-based drinking water standards. No violations.

See report: Inman Campobello WD

? LCF Water District (Liberty-Chesnee-Fingerville), Chesnee, serves: 16,971; 19 contaminants detected, 14 at trace levels with no federal standard. Five below legal limits were Haloacetic acids (HAA5), 20 ppb, legal limit 60 ppb; Total trihalomethanes, 22.1 ppb, 80 ppb legal limit; Chromium (total), 0.313 ppb, legal limit 100 ppb; Fluoride, 0.695 ppm, legal limit, 4 ppm., Nitrate, 0.0265 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm.

From April 2019 to March 2021, LCF Water District complied with health-based drinking water standards. No violations.

See report: CF Water District, Chesnee

? Metro Subdistrict B, Spartanburg, serves 1,849; 18 contaminants detected, 13 at trace levels with no federal standard. Five below legal limit were Haloacetic acids (HAA5), 20.6 ppb, legal limit 60 ppb; Total trihalomethanes, 22.1 ppb, legal limit 80 ppb; Chromium (total), 0.0929 ppb, legal limit, 100 ppb; Fluoride, 0.695 ppm, legal limit, 4 ppm; Nitrate, 0.0265 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm.

From April 2019 to March 2021, Metro Subdistrict B complied with health-based drinking water standards. No violations.

See report: Metro Subdistrict B, Spartanburg

? SJWD Middle Tyger WTP, Lyman, serves 60,592; 16 contaminants detected, 11 at trace levels with no federal standard. Five below legal limit were Haloacetic acids (HAA5), 25.6 ppb, legal limit, 60 ppb; Nitrate, 0.298 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm; Total trihalomethanes, 43.9 ppb, legal limit, 80 ppb; Chromium (total), 0.166 ppb, legal limit, 100 ppb; Fluoride, 0.146 ppm, legal limit, 4 ppm.

From April 2019 to March 2021, SJWD Middle Tyger WTP complied with health-based drinking water standards. No violations.

See report: SJWD Middle Tyger WTP, Lyman

? Spartanburg Water System, Spartanburg, 142,671 people served; 18 contaminants detected, 14 at trace levels with no federal standard; four below legal limit, Haloacetic acids (HAA5), 22.1 ppb, legal limit, 60 ppb; Total trihalomethanes, 35.0 ppb, legal limit, 80 ppb; Chromium (total), 0.0929 ppb, legal limit, 100 ppb; Nitrate, 0.0265 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm.

From April 2019 to March 2021, Spartanburg Water System complied with health-based drinking water standards. One violation. In August 2020 there was one occasion when levels of pH in two different distribution sites fell slightly below the optimal range, as determined by the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control.

See report:Spartanburg Water System

? SWS-Landrum Water Treatment Plant, Spartanburg, serves 4,269; 12 contaminants detected, 7 at trace levels with no federal standard; Five below legal limit, Haloacetic acids, 26.3 ppb, legal limit, 60 ppb; Total trihalomethanes, 32.6 ppb, legal limit, 80 ppb; Ethylbenzene, 0.0474 ppb, legal limit, 700 ppb; Xylenes, 0.428 ppb, legal limit, 10,000 ppb; Nitrate, 0.0983 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm.

From April 2019 to March 2021, SWS-Landrum Water Treatment Plant complied with health-based drinking water standards. No violations.

See report:Sws-landrum Water Treatment Plant, Landrum

? Woodruff Roebuck WD, Woodruff, serves 25,923, 25 contaminants detected, 19 at trace levels with no federal standard; six below legal limit, Haloacetic acids (HAA5), 28.1 ppb, legal limit, 60 ppb; Nitrate, 0.613 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm; Nitrate and nitrite, 0.460 ppm, legal limit, 10 ppm; Total trihalomethanes, 56.4 ppb, legal limit, 80 ppb; Chromium, 0.161 ppb, legal limit, 100 ppb; Fluoride, 0.508 ppm, legal limit, 4 ppm.

From April 2019 to March 2021, Woodruff Roebuck WD complied with health-based drinking water standards.

See report:Woodruff Roebuck WD

Contact Bob Montgomery at bob.montgomery@shj.com

Landrum Wanderings: Remembering summer fun at Rainbow Lake

The days are sunny, the temperatures mild, it’s the time of year when I like to take a drive down some country roads. Today I’m headed down Rainbow Lake Road, leading out of Fingerville. I’ve learned that Rainbow Lake no longer exists, but I’m curious. I want to see if I can locate where this popular summer bathing and picnic spot once existed.I’ve done my research and learned that Rainbow Lake was created by the Spartanburg Water District and existed from 1929 until 1967. A trip to the ...

The days are sunny, the temperatures mild, it’s the time of year when I like to take a drive down some country roads. Today I’m headed down Rainbow Lake Road, leading out of Fingerville. I’ve learned that Rainbow Lake no longer exists, but I’m curious. I want to see if I can locate where this popular summer bathing and picnic spot once existed.

I’ve done my research and learned that Rainbow Lake was created by the Spartanburg Water District and existed from 1929 until 1967. A trip to the Spartanburg Historical Society gave me background information. Ron Swain at the museum dug out a wonderful print by Mike Turnage entitled “Summer’s Call” depicting a busy day at the lake.

I drive out Route 11, turning right at the sign that reads “Rainbow Lake Road.” The first time I saw this sign I envisioned a pretty lake, perfect for fishing and small motorboats. I was saddened to learn that it had been drained. But if you are of a certain age, were a teenager in the late 50s or early 60s, you probably have some nostalgic memories of afternoons spent at Rainbow Lake.

When I Google Rainbow Lake on my computer, I discover videos, slide shows, and descriptions of fun times at the lake. In 2006, John Lane posted “I lived for the moment at the first of June when my mother finally said, ‘This weekend, Rainbow Lake is open.’ When that happened I knew I could stay out at the lake all day every Saturday and watch the teen boys do cannonballs and jackknives and suicide dives off the three-story concrete tower. The dive off the tower was a rite of passage I never achieved at Rainbow Lake. They closed the lake before it happened.”

The entry continues, “And if I didn’t want to swim or sit I could always eat French fries or drink a cherry Coke made with real syrup at the pavilion and wait 30 minutes and then go back in.”

A video shows teenage girls in two piece bathing suits, wading in the water, protecting their poufy hairdos from getting wet. The boys are showing off diving, a lifeguard patrols in a rowboat, sunbathers rub on sun tan lotion to help their skin absorb the sun, not block it. There’s a lot of smiling and splashing as the film plays out.

Most of the structures, bathhouses, rest rooms, pavilions, and rock walls were built by the CCC Camps of the 1920s. A video made in 2008, when some former Rainbow Lake regulars had an opportunity to revisit the grounds, shows these old stone structures along with the large field that was once a lake. I was hoping to locate this field on my drive and discover whether these structures still existed, but the location eluded me.

I pass Rainbow Lake Middle School and cross the bridge over the wide, rapidly flowing Pacolet River. I surmise that perhaps the river had been the water source for the lake. Heading back towards Fingerville, I turn off on a narrow road, crossing a creek. I’m surprised by some large candy canes leading to the entrance of a Christmas tree farm called Christmas Hill. I’ll tuck this place away for a possible story next Christmas. The signs along the road indicate it’s a popular place to find the perfect Christmas tree. The road dead ends so I retrace my route and head back to the main road.

Continuing my journey back on Route 11, I decide to stop for strawberries at Geary Jolley Farms fruit stand, The Peach Basket. I select a pint of red, luscious looking berries and proceed to the counter where Robert McKinney rings up the sale. I decide to probe a little and find out if Robert has memories of Rainbow Lake. He smiles, “Rainbow Lake was a part of growing up. They had a wading area for little kids. The bottom of the lake was all sand, the water was clear and not at all muddy. Beach music played all the time and you could buy hotdogs. It was a lot of fun.”

I inquire about the structures that I saw in the video and he describes a pavilion that is still in use. “They enclosed a pavilion and now you can rent it. My family rented it every Christmas. We’d put up a Christmas tree and have a feast there. It has a kitchen, tables and chairs, and a big gas burning fireplace. You rent it from Spartanburg Water and it’s used all the time for weddings, reunions, and family gatherings. We would call January 1 to reserve it for the next Christmas,” he laughs.

I read online about an effort in 2001 to revive the old lake. Shelia Bailey spearheaded a plan to redevelop Rainbow Lake. The entry online reads, “After listening to a friend reminisce about the old lake, she decided to drive to the property and have a look around. Bailey saw a grassy field, but she ‘could hear the kids playing and just felt this awesome place.’ Rainbow Lake became a mission for Bailey. Council members, however, were reluctant to bite.”

As I depart with my strawberries, music from an old Cowsills song, “Indian Lake,” written by Tony Romeo, plays in my mind. If I substitute the words, “Rainbow Lake,” I’m sure it describes this South Carolina, summer fun spot.

The air is fine with the sweet smelling pine

And the countryside’s pretty,

Indian Lake, is a scene you should make, with your little one,

Keep it in mind if you’re looking to find, a place in the summer sun,

Swim in the cove, have a snack in the grove,

Or you can rent a canoe

At Indian Lake

To quote John Lane again, “Losing Rainbow Lake was like losing a little of our soul. There’s something about swimming in lake water that’s never been replaced for me.”

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