Termite Lawyer in Gramling, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Gramling, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Gramling, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Gramling, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Gramling, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Gramling, SC

Latest News in Gramling, SC

South Carolina Football’s GOAT Series: Top-12 greatest quarterbacks of all-time

South Carolina football will never be mistaken for one of the nation’s top producers of quarterback talent. However, there have still been a number of impressive signal callers who have donned the block C on their helmets. Scramblers, pocket passers, and guys who could do both have taken snaps under center for the Gamecocks. In 2023, Spencer Rattler hopes to build off the end of his 2022 season and add his name to this list.Honorable MentionsBobby Fuller: Had he spent more time i...

South Carolina football will never be mistaken for one of the nation’s top producers of quarterback talent. However, there have still been a number of impressive signal callers who have donned the block C on their helmets. Scramblers, pocket passers, and guys who could do both have taken snaps under center for the Gamecocks. In 2023, Spencer Rattler hopes to build off the end of his 2022 season and add his name to this list.

Honorable Mentions

Bobby Fuller: Had he spent more time in Columbia, Bobby Fuller (1990-1991) certainly would be higher on this list. Fuller transferred to South Carolina from Appalachian State when Sparky Woods became the head coach. On an offense loaded with talent, he threw for almost 5000 yards but led two unremarkable seasons in which the Gamecocks only won 7 FBS games despite only playing 5 ranked opponents.

Garry Harper: Garry Harper (1978-1980) had one job in garnet and black: hand the ball to King George. He did that job well and rode on George Rogers’ back to 20 wins, the same as Gamecock greats Stephen Garcia and Steve Taneyhill. Harper did just enough to give South Carolina a chance to win most weeks, and he had no problem deferring to Rogers and Johnnie Wright.

Dan Reeves: One of the best athletes to play quarterback for the Gamecocks, Dan Reeves (1962-1964) was one of the few bright spots on some bad Carolina teams. Among the all-time quarterback rushers at South Carolina, Reeves went on to a long NFL career as a running back and slot receiver before becoming a great NFL head coach.

Ron Bass: Ron Bass (1973-1977) was a popular quarterback despite following the great Jeff Grantz. Bass was one of the best running quarterbacks in school history and was part of a fun backfield with Clarence Williams and Kevin Long. Immortalized as “Sunshine” in the movie Remember the Titans, Bass had his best performance against rival North Carolina when, filling in for an injured Grantz, he rushed for over 200 yards and two touchdowns in the win.

Allen Mitchell: The starter during most of the “Black Magic” season of 1984, Mitchell split time at quarterback much of his career. He struggled statistically and wasn’t as talented as many other South Carolina quarterbacks. However, Mitchell was a good leader who won way more games than his natural abilities would indicate possible. His toughness was well-respected during his playing career.

Syvelle Newton: Syvelle Newton (2003-2006) was a football player. One of the best athletes to play for the Gamecocks regardless of position, Newton bounced around from position to position but spent two seasons as the leader under center for Lou Holtz and Steve Spurrier. Newton is one of only four players in the history of college football to amass over 600 yards passing, 600 yards rushing, and 600 yards receiving. He also spent time on defense and was a threat offensively, no matter where he was lined up at the snap.

Johnny Gramling: Playing in an era when freshmen were not allowed on the team, Johnny Gramling (1951-1953) started for three seasons and never had a losing season despite the Gamecocks having three losing seasons in a row prior to Gramling getting the job. He was a two-time all-conference player and led South Carolina to two shutout victories over rival Clemson, something that hasn’t happened since Gramling graduated.

South Carolina Football’s No. 12 Greatest Quarterback of All-Time: Mike Hold

Mike Hold (1984-1985) only spent one year as the starter in garnet and black, but it is not the season with which he is most often associated. As a senior, Hold had a decent 1985 season that saw the Gamecocks take a step back from the “Black Magic” of 1984. The previous year, operating primarily as Allen Mitchell’s backup, Hold played in every game and orchestrated two come-from-behind victories.

Also the reserve punter, Hold finished his career with just under 3000 passing yards and over 500 yards on the ground. Arguably his most iconic moment came on the last play of Carolina’s win over Clemson in 1984. In the victory formation, Hold took the snap, killed some clock, and took an unnecessary hit from William “The Refrigerator” Perry. As the whistle blew, Hold took a step back and dropped the ball at Perry’s feet, and allegedly said, “Hold that, Tiger!”

Campobello-Gramling School named South Carolina’s Best Reading School

For the second consecutive year, the top three finalists for the South Carolina International Reading Association’s Exemplary Reading Schools Award were schools from Spartanburg School District One.Campobello-Gramling School was named the SCIRA Exemplary Reading School for 2013. Holly Springs Motlow School was named an honor/ first runner-up school.District One Schools is extraordinarily proud of this accomplishment and it serves to validate that our schools are at the forefront of the best in literacy instruction across ...

For the second consecutive year, the top three finalists for the South Carolina International Reading Association’s Exemplary Reading Schools Award were schools from Spartanburg School District One.

Campobello-Gramling School was named the SCIRA Exemplary Reading School for 2013. Holly Springs Motlow School was named an honor/ first runner-up school.

District One Schools is extraordinarily proud of this accomplishment and it serves to validate that our schools are at the forefront of the best in literacy instruction across the state. When making the announcement of the winning school, the Chairman of the Awards Committee stated that all three schools from District One could have been the winner but the International Reading Association recognizes only one school from each state.

Each school was required to submit an extensive paper application that describes the literacy and reading program and covers these areas: the reading program is consistent with sound theory, research and practice; the reading program facilitates student learning; students have access to a wide variety of reading materials; students demonstrate success in reading; comprehension strategies are taught and applied across the curriculum; listening, speaking, viewing and writing are integrated into and support the reading program; administrators and teachers provide leadership and vision for the building and/or district reading program; the school and/or district offer support services to the program; literacy activities occur outside of school; and the community, including parents, is involved in the reading program.

Spartanburg School District One had several teams of teachers present at the conference to present workshops on our strategies for successful reading schools. Fourteen presentations were given from teachers from Spartanburg District One, including the three Exemplary Reading finalist schools.

Campobello Gramling serves about 765 students in K4-eighth grade.

John Hodge, principal at Campobello Gramling School, said he is extremely proud of the school’s accomplishments.

“Our students, our teachers, and our community worked extremely hard to get to the place where we could receive this award and we will continue to work hard. I am honored to be the principal of one of the three schools in District One who were finalists — what an accomplishment.”

Dr. Ron Garner, Superintendent of District One Schools, Spartanburg, said Campobello Gramling School is to be commended for receiving this honor.

“This recognition only validates what occurs every day in the school and is reflected in the success of the students at Campobello Gramling,” he said. “This is just another example of our district mission to provide a ‘quality, student-centered education. We are just as proud of our other schools that were honored by SCIRA and in our minds, they are all winners for the children we serve.”

– article submitted by Paula Brooks

Top Spartanburg-area girls basketball players to watch going into the 2022-23 season

With the fall sports season winding down, it's time to look forward to the basketball season. Here's a look at some of the top girls basketball players from the Spartanburg area to watch in the 2022-23 season.Note: Stats were submitted by coaches or found on MaxPreps or Hudl. Players are listed in alphabetical order.SPARTANBURG PLAYERS TO WATCH:...

With the fall sports season winding down, it's time to look forward to the basketball season. Here's a look at some of the top girls basketball players from the Spartanburg area to watch in the 2022-23 season.

Note: Stats were submitted by coaches or found on MaxPreps or Hudl. Players are listed in alphabetical order.

SPARTANBURG PLAYERS TO WATCH:Top Spartanburg-area boys basketball players to watch going into the 2022-23 season

FOOTBALL PREDICTIONS:Predicting winners of every South Carolina high school football playoff game

GREENVILLE PLAYERS TO WATCH:Top Greenville County boys basketball players to watch going into the 2022-23 season

KaDerrah Beason, Forward

High Point, Sr.

Beason led High Point in scoring with 17.7 points a game, while adding 6.4 rebounds and a berth to the Upper State championship game. With guard Adiyah Owens graduating, Beason will most likely continue to carry the scoring load for the Grizzlies and could add a layer to her game as a playmaker for new coach Jamaal Brown.

Savannah Brown, Center

Landrum, Jr.

Brown led Landrum with 11 points, 4.5 rebounds, and two assists per game and was the driving force behind a young Cardinals team making a run to the AA Upper State championship game. Brown's handle, size and scoring ability from anywhere on the court is what makes her a special player.

Sadie Burnette, Guard

Woodruff, So.

As a freshman, Burnette led the wolverines in scoring averaging 11.8 points a game, while adding 4.6 rebounds and 3.2 steals. With Burnette leading the way, Woodruff also brings back four of its top five scorers and should lean on her scoring but will also force defenses to stay honest when playing the Wolverines.

Te'Ericka Dowling, Guard

Byrnes, So.

The all-region team selection returns to Byrnes for her Sophomore season after averaging 12.3 points, 5.7 rebound, 2.2 assists and 2.3 steals a game. Dowling should have more opportunity to be the primary offensive weapon for Byrnes as scoring leader Savannah Porterfield has graduated.

Dasia Ferguson, Forward

Dorman, Sr.

Ferguson is the top returning scorer and rebounder from a great 2020-21 Dorman team, averaging 11.4 points, 7.5 rebound and 3.2 steals for the Cavaliers. Ferguson is a defensive stopper, constantly causing turnovers and crashing the defensive boards to end possessions, but this season with both of Dorman's leading scorers graduating, she'll need to increase her production on the offensive end for new coach Ashlen Dewart Dorn.

Annabella Foster, Forward

Blacksburg, Jr.

Foster was a force for Blacksburg in the middle of its offensive and defensive structures as a sophomore last year, averaging 7.4 points, 10.2 rebound and 3.3 steals. With scoring leader Tyty Tate graduating, there is a clear void on the offensive end for the Wildcats that Foster has the ability to fill.

Clara Gramling, Forward

Chapman, Sr.

Gramling averaged 15.8 points, 3.1 rebounds and 2.3 steals last season for a Chapman team that returns most of its roster. Expect Gramling to help lead an improved Panthers team with her scoring and experience.

Leah Page, Forward

Gaffney, Sr.

Page is a versatile big guard/forward that can put the ball in the basket and find her teammates, she averaged 13.5 points, 7.5 rebounds and 4.2 assists for a Gaffney team that finished 2nd in the region, and should be favored to win the region this season.

Shyrique Parker

Gaffney, Jr.

Along with Page, Parker was another big reason for Gaffney's success last season, averaging 16 points, 7.9 rebounds and 3.2 steals -- leading the team in scoring and rebounding.

Olivia Martin, Center

High Point, Sr.

Martin returns to High Point as one of the top interior players in the area, the senior averaged a double-double last season, 11.8 points and 10.3 rebounds a game. The front-court combo of Beason and Martin will be one the deadliest in the area and in all of the 1-A classification.

Krislyn Wilder, Guard

Chapman, So.

Wilder lead Chapman as a freshman in scoring, assists and steals with 16.6 points, 4.8 assists, and 2.4 steals a game while adding 6.8 rebounds.

Josie Workman, Forward

Byrnes, Sr.

The North Greenville commit and all-region selection, Workman averaged 12.3 points, 7 rebounds, 2 blocks and 1.9 steals last season for Byrnes. Along with Dowling, Workman should be one of the go-to scorers and leaders for the Rebels team this season.

Half a degree stole the climate spotlight in 2018

The grim reality of climate change grabbed center stage in 2018.This is the year we learned that the 2015 Paris Agreement on global warming won’t be enough to forestall significant impacts of climate change. And a new field of research explicitly attributed some extreme weather events to human-caused climate change. This one-two punch made it clear that climate change isn’t just something to worry about in the coming decades. It’s already here.This looming problem was apparent three years ago when nearly all o...

The grim reality of climate change grabbed center stage in 2018.

This is the year we learned that the 2015 Paris Agreement on global warming won’t be enough to forestall significant impacts of climate change. And a new field of research explicitly attributed some extreme weather events to human-caused climate change. This one-two punch made it clear that climate change isn’t just something to worry about in the coming decades. It’s already here.

This looming problem was apparent three years ago when nearly all of the world’s nations agreed to cut greenhouse gas emissions to limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius over preindustrial times by 2100 (SN: 1/9/16, p. 6). That pact was hard-won, but even then, some scientists sounded a note of caution: That target wouldn’t be stringent enough to prevent major changes.

So the United Nations took an unprecedented step. It commissioned the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to examine how the world might fare if global warming were limited to 1.5 degrees instead of 2 degrees. That report, released in October, confirmed that half a degree can indeed make a world of difference (SN: 10/27/18, p. 7). A half degree less warming means less sea level rise, fewer species lost due to vanished habitats and fewer life-threatening heat, drought and precipitation extremes (SN: 6/9/18, p. 6).

There’s little time to reverse course. The IPCC report notes that the planet’s average temperature has already increased by nearly 1 degree since preindustrial times, and that rise is contributing to extinctions, lower crop yields and more frequent wildfires. At the end of 2017, three attribution studies for the first time determined that certain extreme events, including an extended marine heat wave in the Pacific Ocean known as “the Blob,” would not have happened without human-induced climate change (SN: 1/20/18, p. 6).

This year, researchers reported that the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season got a boost from warm waters in the tropical Atlantic, fueled by climate change (SN Online: 9/28/18). And a team of scientists determined that climate change was the engine behind September’s intense rainfall from Hurricane Florence in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States (SN Online: 9/13/18).

A report released November 23 by hundreds of U.S. climate scientists from 13 federal agencies put a price tag on many of the effects for the United States (SN Online: 11/28/18). The report predicts the country’s economy will shrink by as much as 10 percent by 2100 if global warming continues on its current trajectory.

Climate simulations suggest that Earth will reach the 1.5 degree threshold within a decade. And even if countries were to agree to limit warming to that level, the planet would almost certainly surpass it before the warming reversed, due to the realities of how quickly emissions can be reduced. Passing that target will probably lead to some irreversible changes, such as melted glaciers and species losses. To overshoot the mark by only a small amount, or not at all, requires reducing emissions by about 45 percent relative to 2010 levels by the year 2030. The planet would then be able to reach net zero, when the amount of carbon released to the atmosphere is balanced by the amount removed, by around 2050, the IPCC report notes.

To bring warming back down below the 1.5 degree target by the end of the century, the world will need negative emissions technologies to remove large amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Such technologies that limit or even reverse warming are less pie-in-the-sky than they sound, says Stephen Pacala, an ecologist at Princeton University. “Although there is a lot of doom and gloom available on the progress of humanity, there isn’t on the technological side.” Pacala chaired a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine committee that released a report in October that analyzed the viability of current and emerging negative emissions technologies as well as encouraged large-scale investments in them.

Some simple negative emissions practices already in use include planting forests to soak up atmospheric carbon, or growing plants for biofuels and then storing underground the CO2 from the burning of those fuels. But current efforts have drawbacks. Planting sufficient forests or biofuel crops “would have a large land footprint,” says economist and IPCC coauthor Sabine Fuss of the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change in Berlin. And that could impact future food availability and biodiversity.

Other negative emissions technologies in development could become game changers, Pacala says. Direct air capture, in which CO2 is removed directly from the atmosphere and converted into synthetic fuel, is a proven technology. But so far, the high cost of direct air capture remains a barrier to commercial-scale development. The National Academies report says that nations should subsidize start-ups to drive competition in this area — after all, that’s what worked for wind and solar power, Pacala notes. Other proposed negative emissions technologies, such as converting atmospheric CO2 into a stable mineral form (SN: 9/15/18, p. 9), show some promise but require large-scale financial investment in their basic science to make them viable, the report states.

Reducing demand for resource-intensive products will also be important to reach the 1.5 degree target, Fuss says. Cities need to move away from fossil fuels, and individuals can do their part by, for example, traveling less (SN: 6/9/18, p. 5), eating less meat (SN: 7/7/18, p. 10) and installing more energy-efficient appliances. Data show that, given the right incentives, people are willing to make such lifestyle changes, says IPCC report coauthor Linda Steg, an environmental psychologist at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. And those incentives aren’t necessarily financial or based on self-interest, she adds. “People are also motivated by protecting the interests of others, or by the quality of the environment.”

Holding warming to 1.5 degrees “is not impossible,” says Natalie Mahowald, a climate scientist at Cornell University and an IPCC report coauthor. But “it really requires ambitious efforts, and the sooner the better. We have to start cutting emissions now.”

Political will to act varies country by country, but scientists have done what they can to convey the urgency and the scope of the climate change problem, says IPCC report coauthor Heleen de Coninck, an environmental scientist at Radboud University in Nijmegen, Netherlands. Nations “have it in their hands, and they know what they are working with,” de Coninck says. “Now it’s up to them.”

9/11 'Never Forget' Museum open this weekend at Patriot's Point

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — A little bit of history rolled into town Friday.The 9/11 'Never Forget' Mobile Museum is stationed in Mount Pleasant this weekend. Its purpose - to make sure no one forgets the thousands of lives lost nearly 15 years ago."When everything was attacked I was in high school," Mount Pleasant firefighter Mike Olson said. "Specifically, in band class."Olson was one of several local firefighters to help set up the mobile museum on the grounds of Patriot's Point.&quo...

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCIV) — A little bit of history rolled into town Friday.

The 9/11 'Never Forget' Mobile Museum is stationed in Mount Pleasant this weekend. Its purpose - to make sure no one forgets the thousands of lives lost nearly 15 years ago.

"When everything was attacked I was in high school," Mount Pleasant firefighter Mike Olson said. "Specifically, in band class."

Olson was one of several local firefighters to help set up the mobile museum on the grounds of Patriot's Point.

"Our mission every day at Patriot's Point - it fits in perfect here," Public Information Officer Chris Hauff of Patriot's Point said. "It's a central location for people to come and go. It's a free exhibit and it's no cost to anybody except for a parking fee."

First responders got a first look at the museum Friday night before it officially opens to the public Saturday at 10 a.m.

"Just extreme pride - extreme emotion about this," Olson said. "This is an emotional day that happened to our country so I'm just extremely, just proud to be a part of this."

"At the end of the day the fire department as a whole is a brotherhood, a family," said Mount Pleasant Fire Captain Edward Gramling.

Gramling served in the Fairfax County fire department September 11th, 2001. He may not have been a part of the rescue efforts at the Pentagon or World Trade Center, but understands the impact.

"If someone in another part of the nation, as a firefighter, hurts, it's a collective hurt among the ranks," he said.

The brotherhood stood together Friday to educate.

"I think it's so important to remember what happened to us as a country, as a city, because we did forget what happened to us in the '93 bombing," retired New York City Fire Commander Jack Oehm said.

"I was a battalion chief at the time," he said. "I lost three out of my nine units - never came back home. So twenty of my men never came back home."

Now, Oehm gives a heartfelt tour through the mobile museum every chance he gets.

"Feeling mad and angry and upset about what happened to us as a country."

He said it's how he keeps more than three thousand memories alive for the next generation of high school kids, who could one day also serve this country.

"I'll never forget it," Olson said. "Didn't really understand the impact of it until I got a little older and now being a firefighter, I now understand how important that event was and the pride I feel just being a part of this today."

The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. It is free to enter. Donations will go to the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation to help build injured Veterans 'smart homes' once then return from combat.

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