Termite Lawyer in Lockhart, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Lockhart, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Lockhart, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Lockhart, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Lockhart, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Lockhart, SC

Latest News in Lockhart, SC

Genesis Digital Assets Expands Bitcoin Mining Activity in ‘Pro-Innovation’ South Carolina

Genesis Digital Assets (GDA), is expanding its U.S. operations, having announced the opening of three new Bitcoin mining data centers in South Carolina.One of GDA's new data centers is located near Anderson, and another two are found between the towns of Union and Lockhart. The three sites all began operations this year and have...

Genesis Digital Assets (GDA), is expanding its U.S. operations, having announced the opening of three new Bitcoin mining data centers in South Carolina.

One of GDA's new data centers is located near Anderson, and another two are found between the towns of Union and Lockhart. The three sites all began operations this year and have a combined total capacity of 33 megawatts (MW).

Additionally, last year GDA broke ground on a 40-megawatt (mw) mining data center in Texas.

One of the world's largest Bitcoin miners, GDA operates mines across Europe, Asia, and North America, and reportedly accounts for about 2% of the Bitcoin network's total hash rate.

Asked about GDA's strategic interest in the state, CEO and Founder Andrey Kim told Decrypt, "Given its abundance of clean electricity from hydro and nuclear energy sources, we consider South Carolina one of the country's most exciting states." He added that it's among the most "pro-innovation states."

New Texas Senate Bill Seeks to Slash Bitcoin Mining Incentives

GDA employed 150 local workers to construct its three new data centers.

“We were impressed to see how these local communities welcomed us so warmly as an opportunity for their economy,” Ankit Joshi, GDA's Head of North America said.

As opposed to the state's neighbor to the north, where a county-wide Bitcoin moratorium was enacted this year, interest in the sector appears to be growing in South Carolina.

Last year a South Carolina delegation, including State Treasurer Curtis Loftis and members of the South Carolina Emerging Tech Association Inc., took an exploratory trip to El Salvador to learn about the country's adoption of Bitcoin.

One of GDA's newest mining sites, the Pacolet data center, is located very close to a Lockhart Power hydroelectric plant.

Kim told Decrypt that GDA strives "to place our data centers near sources of clean energy to ensure our operations run on the most environmentally friendly energy possible."

SC State Guard called in after tornado heavily damages North Central High School in Kershaw County

KERSHAW COUNTY, S.C. — A tornado touched down Saturday night in Kershaw County and damaged a high school, football stadium, and buses, but no one was injured.The tornado touched down Saturday night according to the National Weather Service and struck North Central High School's property.The weather team is still evaluating the track but have determined it was a high end EF-2 Tornado. Richard Okulski, Meteorologist in Charge at the National Weather Service Columbia office, said the preliminary estimate for wind speeds is a...

KERSHAW COUNTY, S.C. — A tornado touched down Saturday night in Kershaw County and damaged a high school, football stadium, and buses, but no one was injured.

The tornado touched down Saturday night according to the National Weather Service and struck North Central High School's property.

The weather team is still evaluating the track but have determined it was a high end EF-2 Tornado. Richard Okulski, Meteorologist in Charge at the National Weather Service Columbia office, said the preliminary estimate for wind speeds is around 130 miles per hour.

The tornado began near the intersection of Lockhart road and Keys Lane according to the National Weather Service.

The impact on the school is immediately evident and is extensive. The roof was blown off of part of the building and damage was done to multiple classrooms. The stands in the football stadium were torn up and a goal post was bent over. In the bus barn nearby, several school buses had heavy damage. Trees near the track were snapped. Concrete stadium bleachers were collapsed along with the press box.

The tornado continued along across the gym lifting all the HVAC units off the roof. The tornado lifted the roof off most of the main building and an older auditorium, then collapsed an exterior wall along a portion of the west side of the building.

It moved four school buses and resulted in broken windows and other damages to the 25-30 school buses parked there. Two large light stands near the baseball field were damaged.

The tornado's path was about a half a mile and about 150 yards wide.

Kershaw County Schools spokesperson Mary Anne Byrd said the State Department of Education is assisting with bus replacements and will be sending students from North Central to an older vocational school about ten minutes away that wasn't being used to send students in light of the damage to the school.

Drone Video shows damage at Kershaw County School

Students in the district were scheduled to be off on Monday and Tuesday due to teacher planning purposes.

Byrd said that the entrance to the school was damaged, along with significant damage to the football stadium, concrete bleachers, and the bus fleet located on the campus. From visual inspections, all of the buses on site except for three had some form of damage to them.

Storm damages Kershaw County school

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Kershaw County: North Central HS

"Fortunately, no one was here on campus so all the damage is physical," said Byrd, "It's buildings, it's buses, it can be replaced."

No word yet on a damage estimate.

Lara Broughton, an English teacher at the school, was shocked to see the damage Sunday afternoon, saying "the pictures on social media do not do it justice. And then, when you get here and you really see how bad it is, it is completely devastating."

School officials caution that NO GofundMe sites or any other fundraising has been set or or being done.

The South Carolina State Guard was called in to help secure the site and will be stationed at the school for the next 48 hours, according to LTC Scott Malyerck. Guard members are trained law enforcement officers, says Malyerck, and will be working with local law enforcement agencies and emergency services to make sure the area is safe.

Lockhart Power To Build Industrial Spec Building

Image: A rendering of Midway Green Industrial Park.On April 26, Lockhart Power Company and Union County broke ground on the Midway Green Industrial Spec Building – a new industrial building designed for a manufacturing company. The building will be located in Midway Green Industrial Park, a 142-acre, South Carolina Certified Park adjacent to SC Highway 49 in Union. Midway Green is owned by Pacolet Milliken Enterprises...

Image: A rendering of Midway Green Industrial Park.

On April 26, Lockhart Power Company and Union County broke ground on the Midway Green Industrial Spec Building – a new industrial building designed for a manufacturing company. The building will be located in Midway Green Industrial Park, a 142-acre, South Carolina Certified Park adjacent to SC Highway 49 in Union. Midway Green is owned by Pacolet Milliken Enterprises, the parent company of Lockhart Power.

Lockhart Power Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, Midway Green Development, LLC, and Union County’s Union County Facilities Corporation, a nonprofit organization, have joined forces to construct Midway Green Industrial Spec Building. The project will include a 100,000 square foot building plus a 100,000 square foot building pad for expansion on 24 acres of land. The building will be one of only a handful of its size and quality in the state. The utility infrastructure within Midway Green Industrial Park includes several million gallons per day of excess water and sewer capacity, more than 30 megawatts of electric power capacity provided by Lockhart Power, and natural gas.

This will be the fourth spec building built in Union County. Others are currently occupied by Haemonetics, Gestamp and Timken Industrial Bearings. The Midway Green building will be the only available building for manufacturing in Union County.

The two organizations have partnered on several large infrastructure projects which have positioned Union County as a viable and competitive option for industrial development.

“We are very excited about this project and the impact it will have on our community,” said Frank Hart, Union County supervisor. “We believe that this type of public-private partnership will be a model for economic development in rural S.C. counties going forward.”

“Lockhart Power, its parent company Pacolet Milliken Enterprises, and the extended Milliken family continuously strives to make a real difference in Union,” said Bryan Stone, chief operating officer at Lockhart Power. “Our significant investment in this speculative manufacturing building is one way in which we are doing so, and we couldn’t be more excited to meet the next world-class company who will call Union its home.”

Engineering for the spec building was completed by DePaul Engineering, Inc. Upstate firm McMillan Pazdan Smith has been selected as the project architect and THS Constructors, based in Greenville, will be the general contractor for the project.

Divided decision produces united Union County school

The anger in Jonesville and Lockhart over the loss of their high schools has faded with time, but the sense of loss still lingers.“Friday night football was the main event up there,” Lockhart business owner Bernice Canupp said.Games were major social gatherings, with residents in both towns coming out to cheer on the Wildcats and Red Devils. School events were supported by the whole community.But that ended 10 years ago, when the high schools in Jonesville and Lockhart were combined with Union ...

The anger in Jonesville and Lockhart over the loss of their high schools has faded with time, but the sense of loss still lingers.

“Friday night football was the main event up there,” Lockhart business owner Bernice Canupp said.

Games were major social gatherings, with residents in both towns coming out to cheer on the Wildcats and Red Devils. School events were supported by the whole community.

But that ended 10 years ago, when the high schools in Jonesville and Lockhart were combined with Union High School to form Union County High.

The decision to consolidate was a divisive one. Many residents of the two communities argued the move would hurt their towns and rob them of a piece of their identity.

The two high schools were estimated to need somewhere in the range of $13 million in repairs. Consolidating the three high schools would save about $1 million annually, the Union County School District estimated.

In the end, economics prevailed, and most residents came to accept the change. But many still miss the institutions that helped bring everyone together.

'A tough decision'

The vote came in March 2007.

“It goes without saying that there was a feeling of loss in the Jonesville community as well as the Lockhart community. Those schools were an important part of the fabric of Union County,” said David Eubanks, who served as Union County's interim superintendent about a month after the vote. “It was a tough decision and it was an emotional decision.”

Consolidation came down to money, he said. Renovating the two high schools would have been costly, and enrollment was declining at all three of the county’s high schools.

“The school board did make that decision, in my opinion, just months before they probably would have had to make it because of the economic downturn,” Eubanks said.

After the 2006-07 school year, 364 Jonesville High students and 117 Lockhart High students became part of the consolidated Union County High School, according to S.C. Department of Education records.

Elementary and middle school students continue to use the Lockhart High building. Even before consolidation, all grade levels shared one facility, but because the lower grades don't require as much technology and lab space as the high school would have needed, the district has been able to focus funds on maintenance.

Jonesville High now houses the town's municipal complex, but still bears banners and logos with the school's old colors and Wildcat mascot.

Current Union County Superintendent Bill Roach said while the decision has come to be accepted by many, it remains an "open wound" for some residents.

“What happened then was, you’re shutting a page of history for a lot of those folks,” he said.

Small town voices

Bernice Canupp owns Lockhart Cafe?, one of only a handful of businesses operating in the town limits.

“I hated it,” Canupp said of the consolidation effort.

Lockhart Cafe? is surrounded by old mill houses that have outlived the mill that was once the heart of the community.

In 1994, Milliken & Co., the town’s major employer, pulled out. Since then, new development has come slowly.

Recently, a Dollar General — referred to by some as “mini Walmart” — was built on the outskirts of town. Rounding out the local businesses are Bailey’s Cafe?, another small restaurant, and two gas stations.

A grocery store, pharmacy or doctor’s office are at least a 20-minute drive away in either Union or Chester County.

In front of the old mill pond, a painted red wall reads, “Welcome to the Beautiful Town of Lockhart.”

“Now, there’s really nothing here,” said Lockhart resident Ronnie Swanger as he passed a recent afternoon fishing at the pond. “It’s just a little forgotten mill village now.”

Swanger, a 1965 Lockhart High graduate, has lived in the town all his life.

“We had our own school, our own teachers," he said. "When I graduated, we only had about 17 seniors."

A 15-minute drive down Highway 9 from Lockhart is Jonesville, a larger and less centralized town.

Jonesville has more residents and businesses than Lockhart, but shared its feelings about consolidation.

Kolby Gage, a lifelong Jonesville resident, was in the school’s final graduating class in 2007. He said he didn’t think much about consolidation at the time. A decade later, he said he’s proud to have been part of history.

“There’s never another class coming from that building,” he said. “It’s part of the culture, even still today.”

Losing an identity

A lingering sore spot for Jonesville and Lockhart residents is how the consolidation plan was executed.

When the high schools were combined, school trustees decided to keep Union High's Yellow Jackets mascot at Union County High. That upset residents who had supported a plan proposed by a group of students, teachers and community members that would have created a new mascot, the Wolfpack, and new school colors to go with the new name.

But school trustees said redoing the signs at the school and elsewhere in the county would cost too much.

“I was disappointed in the way they did that,” lifelong Lockhart resident Gerald Gregory said.

Gage agreed.

“If they were going to combine the schools, they should’ve had a new mascot,” he said. “They shut down Jonesville, they shut down Lockhart, and just made Union bigger.”

Coming together

Some efforts were made to honor the connection the two last high school classes in the Jonesville and Lockhart buildings felt to their old schools.

The Jonesville and Lockhart high classes of 2008 and 2009 were allowed to be academically ranked with both Union County High students and with the Jonesville and Lockhart high groups, respectively. For two years, three high school valedictorians were recognized in Union County.

Students also could choose a transcript bearing the name of Union County, Jonesville or Lockhart high school.

“When it was all said and done, people wanted it to work,” Eubanks said. “And, over time, those people are the reason it worked.”

Eubanks understands why residents were upset. He said he told district staff to be ready to listen to people's concerns.

“We had to have empathy for those folks who had a sense of loss. A sense of healing had to be there,” he said. “The administration, the school board, everyone had to be a good listener. You weren’t going to talk anyone into understanding or accepting the schools were closed.”

A Cowpens High School graduate, Eubanks is no stranger to consolidation. He became principal of Broome High School one year after Spartanburg School District 3 merged Cowpens and Pacolet high schools.

Community members more readily accepted that consolidation because the new school was a fresh start with a new name and mascot, Eubanks said.

“I didn’t disagree with them. I tried to approach it like, ‘I know exactly what you’re talking about. I know those schools are a big part of your community,’” he said. “I think the greatest concern I heard was, ‘We will lose our identity.’ I said, ‘Try to help develop a new identity with that Union County High School.’ I feel there has been an attempt to do that, and just by virtue of the fact I didn’t hear anyone say the consolidation was a problem the last time I was down there, I think a lot of people did that.”

Acceptance

Even though the high school is gone, Gregory said he remains proud of Lockhart schools.

“We all still love and support that school and try to go to about everything they have,” Gregory said.

Students from Lockhart have benefited from going to Union County High, and have more opportunities there now than they would have had at the old school, Swanger said.

“I really didn’t like it to start with, but I really think it’s a good thing now,” he said.

There was also no way the district could've sustained three high schools in the long run, given the declining enrollment, aging facilities and small tax base, Eubanks said.

Roach said in the decade since consolidation, the district has worked hard for its students and its residents. The district has increased the programs offered at Union County High to accommodate students from across the county.

Gregory said while he thinks the process should’ve been handled differently, the bitterness many once felt has long since disappeared.

“You’ve got some with grudges from the start, but it has been good for the kids,” he said.

Eubanks said that sentiment is what has ultimately prevailed.

“There are a lot of people who still have a lot of value for those two schools in their soul, and that’s not going away,” Eubanks said. “I think everyone has come to accept, to a great degree, that it was in the best interest of the students in Union County so they could be better provided for academically.”

WEDDING: Thatcher – Chadwick

Grace Ellis Chadwick and John Zachary Thatcher, both of Aiken, SC, were married Nov. 23, 2019 at St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church. The Reverend Grant B. Wiseman officiated. Claytor Lockhart, cousin of the bride, of Columbia, SC, served as Acolyte.The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Robert Chadwick of Aiken, SC. She is a maternal granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. Rivers Claytor, Jr. of Salem, VA. She is a paternal granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. John David Chadwick of Bristow, VA.The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Russ...

Grace Ellis Chadwick and John Zachary Thatcher, both of Aiken, SC, were married Nov. 23, 2019 at St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church. The Reverend Grant B. Wiseman officiated. Claytor Lockhart, cousin of the bride, of Columbia, SC, served as Acolyte.

The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Robert Chadwick of Aiken, SC. She is a maternal granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. Rivers Claytor, Jr. of Salem, VA. She is a paternal granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. John David Chadwick of Bristow, VA.

The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Russell Thatcher, Jr. of Aiken, SC. He is a maternal grandson of Mrs. Connie Wheeler and the late Mr. Bobby Wheeler of Alma, GA. He is a paternal grandson of Mrs. Judy Thatcher and the late Mr. John Russell Thatcher, Sr. of Charlotte, NC.

Catherine Chadwick, sister of the bride, of Aiken, SC, and Merritt Rowe, cousin of the bride, of Holly Springs, NC, were the maids of honor. Emily Rowe, cousin of the bride, of Charlotte, NC; Sarah Tesikova, sister of the groom, of Roznov, Czech Republic; Riley Kunstel, cousin of the bride, of Gainesville, VA; and Sarah Beth Moore, friend of the bride, of Lexington, SC, all served as bridesmaids. Junior bridesmaid was Mary Lee Lockhart, cousin of the bride, of Columbia, SC.

Best man was Austin Dove, friend of the groom, of Warrenton, VA. Groomsmen were Matthew Travis, friend of the groom, of Aiken, SC; Kevin Crawford, friend of the groom, of Abington, MD; Steve Ernst, friend of the groom, of Rosedale, MD; Nick Keel, friend of the groom, of Greenville, SC; and Rivers Chadwick, brother of the bride, of Aiken, SC. John and Robert Burton, cousins of the groom, of Charlotte, NC, served as ushers.

Flower girls were Zoe and Sadie Tipping, of Columbia, SC. Toby Tipping, of Columbia, SC, and Charles and Victor Walsh, of Lexington, SC, were the page boys.

Special music was provided by Don Dupee, Director of Music, St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church, and a great aunt of the bride, Lori Chadwick Auten, of Charlotte, NC.

Godparents of the bride, Scott and Liz Lewis, of Bristow, VA; aunt of the bride, Beth Kunstel, of Gainesville, VA; uncle of the bride, Jason Lockhart, of Columbia, SC; and uncle of the groom, Larry Burton, of Charlotte, NC were readers.

Scott and Liz Lewis, aforementioned, alongside their children, Caroline and Colin Lewis, also of Bristow, VA, were greeters.

Family friend, Betsy Moore, of Lexington, SC, was the wedding director. Betsy, alongside her daughters, Sarah Beth Moore, aforementioned, and Kathryn Moore, hosted a kitchen shower for the bride.

A dinner and dance reception was held at Woodside Plantation Country Club. Aunts of the bride, Catherine Lockhart, of Columbia, SC, and Sarah Rowe, of Holly Springs, NC, held a farewell breakfast for the couple at Rose Hill before the couple returned to Spartanburg, SC where they will reside.

The bride is a 2019 graduate of USC-Columbia with a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in Public Health. Grace is employed with the FBI-Charlotte Division, working for the Crimes against Children and Human Trafficking program. Maid of honor, Merritt Rowe, hosted Grace and friends in Sunset Beach, NC for a bachelorette weekend.

The groom is a 2019 graduate of USC-Columbia with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Biology. Zach is a first-year medical student at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine-Carolinas. Zach’s bachelor weekend was spent in New Orleans, LA.

The groom's family hosted the rehearsal dinner at The Willcox.

In lieu of wedding favors, the couple made a donation to USC-Dance Marathon, an organization near and dear to their hearts. To learn more about USCDM, please visit USCDM.org.

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