Termite Lawyer in Lyman, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Lyman, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Lyman, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Lyman, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Lyman, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Lyman, SC

Latest News in Lyman, SC

Emma Brooke Alley reflects on The Voice. Here's what's next for the singer from Lyman.

What Emma Brooke Alley thought was a telemarketer call ended up being a producer from The Voice. That call led to a chance for her to appear on the popular NBC music reality show.Alley, a 19-year-old from Lyman, said the producer saw her singing on a social media post. The call would eventually help Alley - her stage name is Emma Brooke - to compete on The Voice this season. She made it to the top 36 before getti...

What Emma Brooke Alley thought was a telemarketer call ended up being a producer from The Voice. That call led to a chance for her to appear on the popular NBC music reality show.

Alley, a 19-year-old from Lyman, said the producer saw her singing on a social media post. The call would eventually help Alley - her stage name is Emma Brooke - to compete on The Voice this season. She made it to the top 36 before getting eliminated on Oct. 31.

She secured a spot on The Voice with a cover of "California Dreamin," by The Mamas & The Papas. Two judges, Gwen Stephani and John Legend turned their chairs for the Spartanburg County native and she went with Team Legend.

"I got two chairs turned, and I was grateful to even have one," she said. "They were the two people that I wanted, John Legend and Gwen Stephani. I thought I was going to go with Gwen, just because she was my top pick of all time, but it was the way that John was speaking to me. He said 'I see this perfection about you in your contemporary music, and I want to take down those walls that you've built and rough up your style and sound.' It immediately caught my attention, he knows what I want on this show."

Emma Brooke Alley competes on The Voice

One obstacle Alley faced on the show was becoming comfortable with diverse music genres. She typically worked with the genres indie, alternative-rock and blues. Alley's battle with Nia Skyfer gave her the opportunity to expand her musical growth.

"I won my battle round with Nia Skyer, we sang 'She's All I Wanna Be,' by Tate McRae, which was a song completely out of my wheelhouse," she said. "It was very pop-rock, Olivia Rodrigo type stuff. When they gave me a pop-rock song I was like 'Oh Lord, this is gonna be fun.' I made it a mission that no matter what song they would give me, I'm going to show them that my voice is flexible and capable."

Skyfer said that competing with Alley was a fun, learning experience.

"Her being so young and yet so skilled with her craft is something I highly admire," Skyfer said in an email. "It never really felt like we were battling each other. I think it felt more like a duet between two friends. Overall, it was a great experience and I'm glad they paired us together."

Alley said the best advice she received came from singer and songwriter Jazmine Sullivan during a coaching segment.

"The advice was to really 'sell my story.' When you're brought up and trained in classical music, it's sometimes hard to really find that connection with that song," Brooke said. "Jazmine taught me this trick about really selling a look with just my eyes. If somebody looks in my eyes and can feel that emotion, it's the strongest way I can convey how I'm feeling. I felt like being there gave me the confidence and gave me the time to work with John (Legend) and myself on how I'm going to take this song and myself to the next level."

The Voice 2022Easley's Ansley Burns reflects on experience working with Blake Shelton

What is next for Emma Brooke Alley's musical career?

Alley said she will appear Nov. 21 at the Spinning Jenny in Greer. She will sing original songs for the Brent Ensley Showcase.

She is currently studying Contemporary Music with Media Applications at Converse University. Alley, who began taking voice lessons at 6 years old at Converse's Lawson Academy of the Arts, plans to complete her four-year degree in 2025 before pursuing a career as a singer-songwriter.

Alley graduated high school from South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities, in May 2021.

She appreciates all of the support from her friends, family and community.

"The night that my blind audition aired, we had a blind audition party at my church, 4 Points Church in Greer," she said. "Just to see the turnout of everyone that came, and they wanted to watch that episode alongside me and support me. Everyone was so full of love."

How Emma Brooke Alley's musical career began

Alley said she remembers singing Disney songs and her voice caught the attention of her parents.

"I was running around the house, singing things like Disney princess songs, Hannah Montana and all the stuff little girls would sing around the house."

"My parents heard a little vibrato sound, and thought 'maybe she can do something with this?' They enrolled me in the Lawson Academy of the Arts and I started taking voice lessons with Dr. Valerie MacPhail, and have been taking lessons with her ever since."

MacPhail, associate professor of Voice and assistant director of the Petrie School of Music at Converse, said that Alley was always an amazing student who worked hard.

"Emma Brooke started studying voice with me when she was 8- years-old. She had a true vocal gift, with a voice that was beautiful and mature beyond her years," MacPhail said. "I truly believe her talents would allow her to be successful in any genre of music, and I feel privileged to be part of her journey as she figures out where she wants to go."

Fish kill on the Middle Tyger River, DNR investigating

LYMAN, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - You may notice dead fish along the shore of the Middle Tyger River.The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is investigating a fish kill.A fish kill is a sudden death of a large number of fish, over a short time, within a certain area. And that area, specifically, is behind the Middle Tyger Library.Brad Kiser knew something was fishy, as he frequents the river often.“We come here and fish, occasionally. It’s usually just small fish,” Kiser said....

LYMAN, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - You may notice dead fish along the shore of the Middle Tyger River.

The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources is investigating a fish kill.

A fish kill is a sudden death of a large number of fish, over a short time, within a certain area. And that area, specifically, is behind the Middle Tyger Library.

Brad Kiser knew something was fishy, as he frequents the river often.

“We come here and fish, occasionally. It’s usually just small fish,” Kiser said.

The fish weren’t biting that day. When Kiser looked down, he quickly figured out why.

“There were dead fish everywhere,” Kiser continues, “This is the first time I’ve seen something like this.”

Kiser snapped a few photos and reported to the DNR. The department nor the Tyger River Foundation were aware of what happened until Saturday, Sep. 17.

Greg Lucas, with the SCDNR, says he understands why residents are alarmed. His team found crappie, largemouth bass, and other assorted species floating by.

“Fish kills are kind of upsetting, just like any time you see a lot of species that die off,” said Lucas.

Lucas explains that fish kills can happen naturally, such as during the Summer when fish get trapped in areas with low oxygen levels, or environmentally.

“It could be pollution,” Lucas said, “It could be an accidental release of, let’s say, fluid from a water treatment plant. It just kind of runs the gamut.”

Lucas says fish kills happen from time-time on lakes and such, but they’re uncommon on a body of water such as the Tyger River. The DNR collected fish to determine the cause of the kill and if any fines are necessary.

Kiser’s main concern is whether this will affect the Lyman community.

“Drinking water is upstream from here,” said Kiser, “So, we kind of wanted to know what exactly is in it.”

Lucas says it depends on what their investigation finds. For now, he suggests visitors stay away.

“Luckily, these things are pretty short-lived,” said Lucas, “If some release of some sort of chemical is causing that, that’s usually caught pretty quickly.”

DHEC’s role is to determine the cause of the fish kill. And if any fines are necessary, DHEC would issues them. SCDNR’s roles is to determine the value of the resource, in monetary terms, and report to DHEC. DNR is still working on its fish kill report.

The number of dead fish is undetermined, but we will follow up once DHEC’s findings are released.

Copyright 2022 WHNS. All rights reserved.

SC student made it through the first round on ‘The Voice.’ Whose team did she pick?

A Converse University student made it through blind auditions on The Voice this week and chose to work with John Legend.Emma Brooke, whose real name is Emma Brooke Alley, was chosen by Gwen Stefani and Legend after singing the Mamas and Papas hit “California Dream.’”She is 19 and from Lyman, South Carolina. She’s trained in classical music but told the judges she wanted to branch out into contemporary music. She is ...

A Converse University student made it through blind auditions on The Voice this week and chose to work with John Legend.

Emma Brooke, whose real name is Emma Brooke Alley, was chosen by Gwen Stefani and Legend after singing the Mamas and Papas hit “California Dream.’”

She is 19 and from Lyman, South Carolina. She’s trained in classical music but told the judges she wanted to branch out into contemporary music. She is a graduate of the Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities in Greenville.

Legend told her he wanted to work with her to help her “unlearn some of the structure that’s been put around” her.

On her Instagram page, she said “I’m so happy that everyone finally got to see what I’ve been working on over the summer! Thank you all so much for all of the love and support! I can’t wait to share this journey with you!”

The Voice tweeted to her: “You’ll fit right in on Team Legend.”

She started taking voice lessons when she was 6 years old.

Her first single “Feelin’ Good” was released in January.

She’s also a member of a blues, indie rock band called The Blue Executive.

“As a singer, musician and performer, I want my music and spirit to fill others’ hearts and souls with music that makes them feel good,” she said on her website. “I sing and perform to use the talent that God has blessed me with to touch and inspire everyone in the room and beyond.”

The Voice is on NBC Mondays and Tuesdays at 8 p.m. and next day on Peacock.

This story was originally published September 28, 2022, 10:08 AM.

Environmental testing underway at abandoned mill site in Lyman

LYMAN, SC (WSPA) – Leaders in one Upstate community are working to bring new life to an abandoned mill site.Mills were once the cornerstone of many Upstate communities.Likewise, many mill properties have been redeveloped.Folks in Lyman hope it’s their turn.“It was such a good group of people,” Reba Bruce recalled.Bruce recently celebrated her 91st birthday. She still lives by the old mill off Pacific Street in Lyman where she once worked.“Oh it was very nice,” she ...

LYMAN, SC (WSPA) – Leaders in one Upstate community are working to bring new life to an abandoned mill site.

Mills were once the cornerstone of many Upstate communities.

Likewise, many mill properties have been redeveloped.

Folks in Lyman hope it’s their turn.

“It was such a good group of people,” Reba Bruce recalled.

Bruce recently celebrated her 91st birthday. She still lives by the old mill off Pacific Street in Lyman where she once worked.

“Oh it was very nice,” she said. “We just enjoyed working there and to see it like it is, it’s sad.”

Their piece of history is marked with graffiti and signs of condemnation.

The mill closed in 2005, and much of it was demolished years later.

“The mill was Lyman,” Mayor Larry Chappell said.

He said the property has become an eyesore and the Environmental Protection Agency is testing the site to see how it can be cleaned up.

“Trying to drill and get samples,” the mayor said, adding that the town met with the EPA, DHEC, the Appalachian Council of Governments, and property owners. “We had some people come in that had worked in the mill and gave them some ideas of what happened in the mill.”

He says some of the property is in Spartanburg County.

The EPA’s federal assistance will fund the environmental testing needed for redevelopment.

“After they get the asbestos and any hazardous material out there then I think it’ll be more likely that developers may come and say okay it’ll cost me $50k or $100k to tear all this down,” Chappell said. “Hopefully we see something over there – maybe storefronts or homes or whatever.”

Whatever it is, Bruce wants something their mill village can be proud to look at every day.

“I just hope they’ll do something nice with it,” Bruce said.

The mayor says they’ve already started phase one of the testing.

The town is working on the project with a Greenville-based company called SynTerra Corp., which plans to hold a public forum later this year.

Lyman job training center helps people with disabilities

zach.fox@shj.comA new facility is helping workers with disabilities in the Lyman area find employment more easily.The S.C. Vocational Rehabilitation Department's Bryant Center in Lyman, just down the street from Byrnes High School, recently opened a new job training center. The facility is designed to provide job training to people with disabilities looking to enter the workforce."It was truly about 20 years in the making," said Jennie Thomas, Vocational Rehab area administrator. "It is trul...

zach.fox@shj.com

A new facility is helping workers with disabilities in the Lyman area find employment more easily.

The S.C. Vocational Rehabilitation Department's Bryant Center in Lyman, just down the street from Byrnes High School, recently opened a new job training center. The facility is designed to provide job training to people with disabilities looking to enter the workforce.

"It was truly about 20 years in the making," said Jennie Thomas, Vocational Rehab area administrator. "It is truly the anchor piece of this whole facility."

The Bryant Center opened in 2010 with employment counseling and services. The training center opened in July, but next month, potential employers will be welcomed to the facility to learn more about the training it provides and the benefits workers there could have on business.

Thomas said the training center was the missing piece of the puzzle at the Bryant Center — giving workers with disabilities the chance to train in some of the jobs they'd likely get in the workforce.

"The problem (many businesses) have right now is people," said Jay Weisner, training center manager. "It's a win-win for us to help corporate partners. They bring a product in here and our people clock in and clock out, take breaks, so when they leave here, they already have the skills, the aptitude, to work. They're already training on-the-job to do the job."

The facility already has partnerships with Sloan Construction Co. and BPO American, a local call center.

Classes in heavy equipment operation, including an OSHA certification and simulator training, are available in the new facility. An on-site call center lets people field real, live calls from customers. Software and hardware similar to what's found in offices is in place to give those training the most hands-on experience possible, Thomas said.

The facility gets workers with disabilities ready to enter the workforce. Clients from age 15 up, some of whom come from Byrnes High, train there to get a better idea of how a workday typically goes what a typical businesses environment is like.

Weisner spent more than 30 years working in production for several private companies. He said his industry experience better enables the training center to mimic how business works.

"That is my background, with a master's degree and all that, but here, we recreate jobs at companies and industries in the area," he said. "We can benefit (trainees) in so many different ways. The things you see our clients doing are real jobs for real clients."

Friday morning, those trainees specially folded boxes that will be used to cover machinery pieces during transit and put together packages of plastic gloves used by workers in several fields.

The facility hit the ground running, welcoming 17 area businesses the day it opened this summer, Weisner said. Since, more than 100 businesses have signed on as partners.

"They get out of here and they get hired, that's the end goal," Weisner said.

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