Termite Lawyer in Moore, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Moore, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Moore, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Moore, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Moore, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Moore, SC

Latest News in Moore, SC

Dr. Kim Moore named as new Richland Two Superintendent

Moore had previously been serving in the Pasco County, FL school district.COLUMBIA, S.C. — Richland School District Two has hired Dr. Kim Moore to be its new superintendent after a months long search.The school board announced their decision Tuesday night, voting 6-1 in favor of her nomination, with Board Chair Linda Agostini being the only no vote. Agostini objected to some of the process in making the selection, not against Moore herself.Moo...

Moore had previously been serving in the Pasco County, FL school district.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Richland School District Two has hired Dr. Kim Moore to be its new superintendent after a months long search.

The school board announced their decision Tuesday night, voting 6-1 in favor of her nomination, with Board Chair Linda Agostini being the only no vote. Agostini objected to some of the process in making the selection, not against Moore herself.

Moore had previously been serving as Assistant Superintendent of Career and Innovative Programs in the Pasco County School District of Florida.

"I walk the talk that I talk," Moore said in comments shortly after the announcement was made. "We are committed to one thing and one thing only: and that is to provide the best educational experience to each and every child that we have the privilege to educate.

Dr. Moore and two others--Dr. Nia Campbell and Dr. Benjamin Henry--were named as finalists earlier this month. They were in town this week for interviews with administrators, teachers, parents, students, and community members.

Officials said the national search resulted in 39 applicants from 20 states aspiring to lead the fifth-largest school district in South Carolina.

Moore takes over for a district that has been without a superintendent since January, when former superintendent Dr. Baron Davis and the school board agreed to part ways. Nancy Gregory has been serving as the interim since then.

Here's biographical information about Moore provided by the district:

Dr. Kim Moore

Dr. Kim Moore is the Assistant Superintendent of Career and Innovative Programs in the Pasco County School District of Florida, leading their workforce development programs, PreK-12 STEM/STEAM schools, and technical college.

Moore is a retired U.S. Army Chemical Corps Officer, Adjunct Faculty Member for Nova Southeastern University, and Executive Director for Maxwell Leadership.

Moore says she is passionate about leadership and education, and her philosophy is to lead by example.

During Moore’s military career, she served in numerous leadership positions, specializing in Nuclear, Biological, Chemical (NBC) Weapons, and Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). Her last assignment was at The Pentagon as Assistant for Negotiations, Office of the Secretary of Defense, Department of the Army.

Supreme Court hears tax case on ‘income’: It may ‘have the biggest fiscal policy effects of any court decision,’ expert says

People exit the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, June 27, 2023.Minh Connors | The Washington Post | Getty ImagesThe Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday on a case that could affect broad swaths of the U.S. tax code and federal revenue.The closely watched case, ...

People exit the Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, June 27, 2023.

Minh Connors | The Washington Post | Getty Images

The Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday on a case that could affect broad swaths of the U.S. tax code and federal revenue.

The closely watched case, Moore v. United States, involves a Washington couple, Charles and Kathleen Moore. They own a controlling interest in a profitable foreign company affected by a tax enacted via former President Donald Trump’s 2017 tax overhaul.

The Moores are fighting a levy on company earnings that weren’t distributed to them — which challenges the definition of income — and could have sweeping effects on the U.S. tax code, according to experts.

“This could have the biggest fiscal policy effects of any court decision in the modern era,” said Matt Gardner, a senior fellow at the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy, who co-authored a report on the case.

More from Personal Finance:FAFSA: The new college financial aid application will open by Dec. 31More states require students to take a personal finance courseHere’s where to invest your cash to save on taxes in 2024

The case challenges a levy, known as “deemed repatriation,” enacted via the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Designed as a transition tax, the legislation required a one-time levy on earnings and profits accumulated in foreign entities after 1986.

While the 16th Amendment outlines the legal definition of income, the Moore case questions whether individuals must “realize” or receive profits before incurring taxes. It’s an issue that has been raised during past federal “billionaire tax” debates and could affect future proposals, including wealth taxes.

Former House Speaker Paul Ryan, who helped draft the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, said at a Brookings Institution event in September that the goal was to “finance a conversion from one system to another, and it wasn’t to justify a wealth tax.”

Ryan, who doesn’t support a wealth tax, said using the Moores’ argument to block one would require getting rid of “a third of the tax code.”

Pass-through businesses could be affected

Depending on how the court decides this case, there could be either small ripples or a major effect on the tax code, according to Daniel Bunn, president and CEO of the Tax Foundation, who has written about the topic.

If the court decides the Moores incurred a tax on unrealized income and says the levy is unconstitutional, it could affect the future taxation of so-called pass-through entities, such as partnerships, limited liability corporations and S corporations, he said.

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“You’ve got to pay attention to the way the rules are going to impact your business, especially if you’re doing things in a cross-border context,” Bunn said.

There’s also the potential for a “substantial impact” on federal revenue, which could influence future tax policy, Bunn said. If deemed repatriation were fully struck down for corporate and noncorporate taxpayers, the Tax Foundation estimates federal revenue would be reduced by $346 billion over the next decade.

However, with a decision not expected until 2024, it’s difficult to predict how the Supreme Court may rule on this case. “There’s a lot of uncertainty about the scope of this thing,” Gardner added.

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The women’s scoring record belongs to Pearl Moore. Caitlin Clark is unlikely to reach it this year

FLORENCE, S.C. (AP) — Long before Iowa star Caitlin Clark hit her first long-range three or signed her first autograph, Pearl Moore set a scoring standard for women’s basketball that has stood for 45 years.The soft-spoken woman from South Carolina led her team at Francis Marion to the postseason four years in a row, averaging more than 30 points every season. The 5-foot-7 guard once s...

FLORENCE, S.C. (AP) — Long before Iowa star Caitlin Clark hit her first long-range three or signed her first autograph, Pearl Moore set a scoring standard for women’s basketball that has stood for 45 years.

The soft-spoken woman from South Carolina led her team at Francis Marion to the postseason four years in a row, averaging more than 30 points every season. The 5-foot-7 guard once scored 60 points in a game.

She did it all under the radar in many ways, playing at a tiny school from 1975-79 when the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) oversaw the sport. Her career points total — a staggering 4,061 — still stands as the overall record in women’s hoops and is unlikely to fall this season even if Clark and the Hawkeyes make another deep NCAA Tournament run.

The 66-year-old Moore is retired now, living in her hometown of Florence about a 90-minute drive from Columbia and the home of the top-ranked South Carolina program many believe will win the national championship this season. Iowa, which lost in the title game last season, is also among the favorites.

AP AUDIO: The women’s scoring record belongs to Pearl Moore. Caitlin Clark is unlikely to reach it this year.

AP Washington correspondent Sagar Meghani reports Iowa’s Caitlin Clark is close to becoming the NCAA’s all-time women’s basketball scoring leader -- but she’s far off the all-time women’s mark.

Moore will be watching. She has enjoyed following Clark’s run at the NCAA scoring record, amazed at her skill along with her composure in handling the demands of packed arenas and constant attention.

“She can lead her team, she can pass and she can score,” Moore said. “Those are three key components to being a great player.”

Moore’s journey to becoming the greatest scorer in the women’s game began in an era when women were not generally encouraged to play sports. But as part of a family of 11 children, there was always a game to join and she said she took to basketball because “there was something about that ball going through the hoop.”

And she could do that in bunches.

“I wanted to win and to do that, you had to score points, so I scored points,” Moore said during an interview courtside at the Pearl Moore Center in Florence.

Moore remembers getting just a couple of inquiries about playing college ball from schools in the AIAW, which at one point had more than 1,000 member schools.

She began her college career at Anderson Junior College, where she scored 177 points in eight games. Always a homebody, Moore came back to the Florence area to play for Francis Marion, now part of NCAA Division II. In those days, women’s basketball was largely the purview of the AIAW, which lasted until 1982, but Francis Marion was among the smaller schools by any measure.

Moore played for Sylvia Hatchell, who went on to win an NCAA championship with North Carolina. Hatchell wold marvel at Moore’s ability to get off shots. Hatchell said Moore would often wait for a defender to get close enough for contact before shooting and come away with the extra foul shots.

“She always said that,” Moore acknowledged. “But I just knew we had to get as many points as we could.”

Moore played professionally after college for the New York and St. Louis franchises of the old Women’s Professional Basketball League. She won a league title with the New York Stars her rookie season, playing sparsely attended games at the Felt Forum at Madison Square Garden.

Moore played a season overseas in Venezuela after the WPBL folded and won that league’s championship as well. She did not understand much of the language, except about her main objective.

“They kept yelling, ‘Lonza,’” Moore recalled, which means “ready for battle” and she interpreted as keep shooting.

After that season in 1982, Moore wanted to return to her hometown where she would hold youth basketball camps and work for the Postal Service. She was enshrined in the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 2011 and the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame 10 years later, with Hatchell as her presenter.

While Moore holds the overall record, former Kansas star Lynette Woodard holds the women’s major college basketball record with 3,649 points from 1978-81. Kelsey Plum set the women’s NCAA record after her four-year career at Washington (2013-17) and that total is the one Clark is set to pass this week to draw closer to Woodard and Moore.

South Carolina assistant coach Jolette Law grew up in Florence and played at the same high school as Moore, Wilson High. Law remembers how Moore played hard and was practically unguardable against women and men alike.

Moore coached Law at youth clinics and at high school practices, helping her get recruited to Iowa under C. Vivian Stringer. Law considers Moore a mentor and inspiration.

“To have someone like that help me learn the game was very special,” said Law, who was honored by her hometown when the court at the Pearl Moore Center was named for her.

Moore brushed off the notion of where she might rank into today’s game. Many of her shots, Francis Marion’s longtime media relations and marketing director affirmed, came beyond the 3-point line distance of 22 feet, 1 3/4 inches.

“I’m not the only one that affects,” she said. “Players like Lynette Woodard and Carol Blazejowski would’ve had bigger totals as well because of how we played.”

Blazejowski played at Montclair State in the mid-70s and finished with 3,199 points.

Moore said she is grateful for her accomplishments, content with her place in the game and she is happy for Clark.

“Just tell those (TV) analysts to make sure they call it right” as the NCAA scoring record, she quipped.

___

AP women’s college basketball: https://apnews.com/hub/ap-top-25-womens-college-basketball-poll and https://apnews.com/hub/womens-college-basketball

Rohit Verma selected as new Moore School dean

Rohit Verma has been selected as dean of the Darla Moore School of Business, effective August 1.Verma joins the Moore School from VinUniversity in Hanoi, Vietnam, where he serves as the founding provost of Vietnam’s first private, not-for-profit university based on international standards. Verma is also a professor of operations, technology and information management at Cornell University’s SC Johnson College of Business. Prior to his role at VinUniversity, which was established in strategic collaboration with Cornell and ...

Rohit Verma has been selected as dean of the Darla Moore School of Business, effective August 1.

Verma joins the Moore School from VinUniversity in Hanoi, Vietnam, where he serves as the founding provost of Vietnam’s first private, not-for-profit university based on international standards. Verma is also a professor of operations, technology and information management at Cornell University’s SC Johnson College of Business. Prior to his role at VinUniversity, which was established in strategic collaboration with Cornell and the University of Pennsylvania, Verma served as dean of external affairs at Cornell’s SC Johnson College of Business.

Verma’s leadership experience at Cornell also includes serving as the executive director for the Center for Hospitality Research and as the founding executive director for the Institute for Healthy Futures. While on leave from Cornell since 2019, Verma has served in several concurrent leadership positions at VinUniversity, where he won the Excellent Leader Award in 2021.

“Dr. Verma is an award-winning teacher, a successful researcher, and an innovative leader, and we are pleased to welcome him to the Carolina family,” USC President Michael Amiridis said. “His excellent academic record and his international perspective will be great complements to the leading-edge work of the Darla Moore School of Business.”

As a founding member of an international university, Verma was in a unique position to shape the school’s standard of excellence through innovative and decisive leadership. During his time with VinUniversity, Verma has been able to recruit highly accomplished and diverse academic leaders and faculty from over 10 countries, establish a fully integrated campus life system, and develop curriculum programs for all degree programs based on active learning and experiential learning. He is eager to apply the lessons he has learned to the Darla Moore School of Business.

“Dr. Verma is a world-class leader whose experience and success at both Cornell University and VinUniversity have prepared him to add tremendous value to the Moore School,” said Donna Arnett, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs. “I look forward to working with Dr. Verma to uphold and enhance the Moore School’s outstanding international reputation, and to continue advancing the incredible contributions the school is making to the world of business.”

The Darla Moore School of Business is globally recognized for its international business program and boasts outstanding job placement rates, thanks to the robust education students receive in applied business analytics, experiential learning, and interpersonal and communications skills.

The school is also home to 12 research centers, which bolster the university’s research excellence through faculty members’ groundbreaking work and industry expertise. Verma looks forward to strengthening the school’s international reputation through expanded opportunities for impactful research, active and experiential learning, and meaningful engagement with industry thought leaders, corporations, and community members.

“From the very early stage in my academic career, I have taken a multi-disciplinary perspective and collaborated actively with colleagues from other fields,” said Verma. “I hope to collaborate with all colleagues at the Moore School in ensuring that the school’s core values are reflected and prioritized in all aspects of our work.”

Darla Moore School of Business

Darla Moore School of BusinessThe Darla Moore School of Business offers a remarkable array of program choices for careers in business. You will have the opportunity to receive an education that prepares you to be data proficient, analytically capable, and functionally grounded, ready for today and tomorrow’s business challenges. ...

Darla Moore School of Business

The Darla Moore School of Business offers a remarkable array of program choices for careers in business. You will have the opportunity to receive an education that prepares you to be data proficient, analytically capable, and functionally grounded, ready for today and tomorrow’s business challenges.

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