Termite Lawyer in Piedmont, SC

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When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Piedmont, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Piedmont, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Piedmont, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Piedmont, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Piedmont, SC

Latest News in Piedmont, SC

Piedmont Natural Gas debuts consumer-friendly carbon-reducing program for South Carolina and Tennessee customers

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Residential and commercial Piedmont Natural Gas customers in South Carolina and Tennessee now can reduce the impact of their own natural gas usage by participating in GreenEdge – a voluntary program that offers customers the opportunity to purchase green “blocks” from Piedmont and then claim the associated environmental benefits.Piedmont Natural Gas customers can subscribe to one block for $3 a month. Each block funds carbon offset projects that help protect forests and wetlands as well as ren...

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Residential and commercial Piedmont Natural Gas customers in South Carolina and Tennessee now can reduce the impact of their own natural gas usage by participating in GreenEdge – a voluntary program that offers customers the opportunity to purchase green “blocks” from Piedmont and then claim the associated environmental benefits.

Piedmont Natural Gas customers can subscribe to one block for $3 a month. Each block funds carbon offset projects that help protect forests and wetlands as well as renewable natural gas projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

“The GreenEdge program was designed based on customer feedback to provide access to tools and programs for customers to pursue their own carbon-reduction goals,” said Sasha Weintraub, senior vice president and president of Piedmont Natural Gas. “We consider it an important part of Piedmont’s own clean energy transformation, as well. We’re excited to now make GreenEdge available to our South Carolina and Tennessee customers.”

Piedmont made the GreenEdge program available to its North Carolina customers last summer. By the end of 2022, enrolled customers offset 367 metric tons of carbon emissions, or the equivalent of greenhouse emissions created by driving an average gasoline-powered car for 940,822 miles.

Each $3 block is equivalent to 12.5 therms of natural gas usage. Just one block is equal to 25% of an average household’s monthly natural gas usage, meaning customers who purchase four blocks could claim associated environmental benefits for approximately 100% of their monthly household natural gas usage.

Carbon offsets and renewable natural gas environmental attributes are defined as:

When a customer purchases a block, Piedmont will add the associated charges to that customer’s bill. There is no limit on how many blocks a customer can purchase. Participating customers will receive an annual report highlighting their contributions and their overall effect on GreenEdge, which is a self-funding program.

Piedmont received approval for GreenEdge from the South Carolina Public Service Commission in April 2023 and from the Tennessee Public Utility Commission in March 2023.

For more information or to enroll in GreenEdge, visit Piedmont’s GreenEdge webpage.

Piedmont Natural Gas, a subsidiary of Duke Energy, distributes natural gas to more than 1.1 million residential, commercial, industrial and power generation customers in North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. Piedmont Natural Gas earned the No. 1 spot in customer satisfaction with residential natural gas service in the South among large utilities, according to the J.D. Power 2022 U.S. Gas Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction Study, and has been named by Cogent Reports as one of the most trusted utility brands in the U.S. More information: piedmontng.com. Follow Piedmont Natural Gas: Twitter, Facebook.

Duke Energy (NYSE: DUK), a Fortune 150 company headquartered in Charlotte, N.C., is one of America’s largest energy holding companies. Its electric utilities serve 8.2 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Indiana, Ohio and Kentucky, and collectively own 50,000 megawatts of energy capacity. Its natural gas unit serves 1.6 million customers in North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio and Kentucky. The company employs 28,000 people.

Duke Energy is executing an aggressive clean energy transition to achieve its goals of net-zero methane emissions from its natural gas business by 2030 and net-zero carbon emissions from electricity generation by 2050. The company has interim carbon emission targets of at least 50% reduction from electric generation by 2030, 50% for Scope 2 and certain Scope 3 upstream and downstream emissions by 2035, and 80% from electric generation by 2040. In addition, the company is investing in major electric grid enhancements and energy storage, and exploring zero-emission power generation technologies such as hydrogen and advanced nuclear.

Duke Energy was named to Fortune’s 2022 “World’s Most Admired Companies” list and Forbes’ “World’s Best Employers” list. More information is available at duke-energy.com. The Duke Energy News Center contains news releases, fact sheets, photos and videos. Duke Energy’s illumination features stories about people, innovations, community topics and environmental issues. Follow Duke Energy on Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and Facebook.

Ramen noodle company bringing 300+ jobs to Greenville Co.

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - Nissin Foods is expanding its U.S. footprint by establishing new operations in Greenville County. The company, known for producing popular instant ramen products, has announced a planned $228 million investment that will create over 300 new jobs.“Nissin Foods has seen sustained sales growth year-over-year, especially over the last five years, driven by unprecedented demand for our products,” said Nissin Foods President and CEO Michael Price. “As we developed the company’s expan...

GREENVILLE, S.C. (FOX Carolina) - Nissin Foods is expanding its U.S. footprint by establishing new operations in Greenville County. The company, known for producing popular instant ramen products, has announced a planned $228 million investment that will create over 300 new jobs.

“Nissin Foods has seen sustained sales growth year-over-year, especially over the last five years, driven by unprecedented demand for our products,” said Nissin Foods President and CEO Michael Price. “As we developed the company’s expansion plans, we determined early on that Greenville, South Carolina was the ideal location for our newest manufacturing facility.”

Nissin plans to purchase a 640,640-square-foot building located at 1170 Bracken Road in Piedmont for its new Greenville County manufacturing facility; and also has existing manufacturing facilities in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and Gardena, California.

“Greenville is among the fastest growing manufacturing cities in the country, and many other top brands are produced there,” added Price. “In addition to being a significant milestone in Nissin’s history, this investment will allow us to optimize production capabilities, grow the organization, bring jobs to the community and continue to fortify our innovation pipeline.”

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved job development credits related to this project. The council also awarded a $250,000 Set-Aside grant to Greenville County to assist with the cost of building improvements. The new Greenville County operation is expected to help the company enhance continued product development and innovation while meeting the surging consumer demand.

“Congratulations to Nissin Foods and Greenville County on bringing over 300 new jobs to South Carolina,” said South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. “This collaboration provides additional opportunities for Nissin Foods to serve its worldwide customer base while contributing to the Greenville community.”

Operations are expected to be online in August 2025. Individuals interested in joining the Nissin Foods team should visit the company’s careers page.

MORE NEWS: Instant ramen Cup Noodles will be microwaveable, changing from foam to paper cup

Copyright 2023 WHNS. All rights reserved.

Here's how 3 Upstate SC parks and recreation areas will spend $1.3M in federal grants

Thirteen recreation projects across South Carolina will see upgrades and improvements on park grounds, boating docks and more as a total of $4.2 million in federal Land and Water Conservation Funds (LWCF) were awarded throughout the state at the end of January.Three of those thirteen projects will enhance Upstate based parks as Piedmont Riverfront Park (Anderson), Duncan Park (Spartanburg), and Gower Park (Greenville) will see a total of $1.3 million of LWCF dollars applied to their enrichment plans.These federal funds come in ...

Thirteen recreation projects across South Carolina will see upgrades and improvements on park grounds, boating docks and more as a total of $4.2 million in federal Land and Water Conservation Funds (LWCF) were awarded throughout the state at the end of January.

Three of those thirteen projects will enhance Upstate based parks as Piedmont Riverfront Park (Anderson), Duncan Park (Spartanburg), and Gower Park (Greenville) will see a total of $1.3 million of LWCF dollars applied to their enrichment plans.

These federal funds come in response to increased activity at local parks amid the COVID-19 pandemic, said Samantha Queen, director of communications at S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism.

In 2020 outdoor recreation increased as people looked for safe, socially distanced activities. The influx of visitors put a larger demand on parks across the state, Queen said.

In addition, the expansion of Paris Mountain alongside Mountain Bridge Wilderness Area will provide more acreage to two of the more popular state parks, which are intended to provide more access points to greenspaces into northern Greenville County, she added.

The 2022 LWCF grant recipients were selected based upon plans and their history of maintaining their parks and administering grants.

Park project upgrades are not expected to begin until summer or fall of 2023 and could expand well into 2024 depending upon the remaining funding needed to complete the upgrades.

Here are the parks that received federal grant funding in the Upstate and will see a major overhaul in upcoming years.

Gower Park Renovation, City of Greenville

? Federal Grant Total: $500,000 ? Total Project Cost: $1,400,000

The spider-web cracks seen on the basketball and tennis grounds are soon to disappear as Gower Park's ball courts will be reupholstered with a resurfaced asphalt for safer hoops and racket-based activities.

Gower Park will also add eight new pickleball courts to the property with an additional renovation headed to the parking lot, which is slated to begin later in 2023, said Jeff Waters, senior capital projects manager at the city of Greenville.

"We want to improve the assets we have to make sure it's safe, attractive and user friendly," Waters said. "We're excited about the new look and making our parks more enjoyable."

Waters anticipates the remaining $900,000 dollars to come from a neighborhood improvement bond package fund, and shortly after those funds are secured, the construction portion of the project will go out to bid.

Duncan Park, City of Spartanburg

? Federal Grant Total: $300,000 ? Total Project Cost: $600,000

In collaboration with PAL Spartanburg, the city of Spartanburg will upgrade the Mary Black Foundation Rail Trail with just over a mile worth of asphalt upgrades that will expand out across Union Street.

The project will also address the invasive plant species that are beginning to take over the biosystem as Privet, Wisteria, and Eleganus flowers are growing up alongside the trees and choking out the native plants.

"We want to enrich that area naturally," said Ned Barrett trail development manager of PAL Spartanburg. "Duncan Park is a really great property in the middle of the city. The lake is not used, and the woods don't see the same activity as the baseball stadium or tennis courts. We want to activate that entire property to make it available for more people to use."

The final park upgrade will see the reconstruction of a 40-foot wooden bridge and be rebuilt with aluminum materials for easier maintenance and upkeep, Barrett said.

The city of Spartanburg will contribute the remaining $300,000 dollars to the overall project with a timeline of early 2024 for its full completion.

Piedmont Riverfront Park Phase One, Anderson County

? Federal Grant Awarded: $500,000 ? Total Project Cost: $1,210,065

An expansion of the Saluda River Rally and Rhythm on the River are on the horizon as phase one of the 48-mile river corridor development project will introduce additional ADA-compliant kayaking docks for safe launch and takeouts to-and-from the river.

Phase one is the beginning of a six-section project which will eventually connect Powdersville to Ware Sholas via the Saluda River, and additionally promote fishing, walking, experiencing wildlife and duck hunting as a shoreline trail will come with the project upgrade.

"It will fit in neatly with our plans of the Saluda River Blue Trail," said Rusty Burns, Anderson County Administrator. "There will be plenty of room for everyone to enjoy the camp trail, getting back to nature and even concerts by the river.

Anderson County has a favorable notice to secure the remaining funds for phase one of the project, yet the source of where it will come from is unknown at the time, said Matt Schell, parks manager for Anderson County.

There is anticipation of the project to conclude near the end of fall 2023.

– A.J. Jackson covers the food & dining scene, along with arts, entertainment and more for The Greenville News and Anderson Independent Mail. Contact him by email at ajackson@gannett.com, and follow him on Twitter @ajhappened.

Developers move forward with Piedmont riverfront community

This story first appeared in the Feb. 21 print edition of GSA Business Report.Developers of a green townhouse community on the banks of a Saluda River mill dam plan to break ground this spring after a two-year pause.In 2019, Red Oak Developers went public with plans to create a hydro-powered residential development within the bones of 1876-era Piedmont Mill One.Only a smokestack stands from the original mil...

This story first appeared in the Feb. 21 print edition of GSA Business Report.

Developers of a green townhouse community on the banks of a Saluda River mill dam plan to break ground this spring after a two-year pause.

In 2019, Red Oak Developers went public with plans to create a hydro-powered residential development within the bones of 1876-era Piedmont Mill One.

Only a smokestack stands from the original mill itself following a 1983 fire, but at one point, according to the S.C. Historic Properties Record, Piedmont Manufacturing’s Henry Hammett built out the property to be one of the largest textile plants in the world in the 1800s.

The Saluda River dam, a footbridge across the river between two of the Piedmont mill sites and a soon-to-be renovated mercantile space remain, laying the groundwork for what Red Oak Developer’s Brad Skelton hopes will become a “cool urban living” space.

The area is “prime for the pickings,” he said, with Piedmont’s close proximity to Greenville and cheaper property than in most municipalities in the county. The historic structures and corresponding tax credits also sweeten the pot.

“I think it will be more of a millennial vibe maybe. In the town of Piedmont itself, which is contiguous, there are several developers who are already upfitting some of the old building there,” he said. “There’s already a co-work space in an old bank there.”

Plans for the refurbished mercantile space will also cater to the younger demographic: a coffee shop, taphouse, cafe and five art studios committed to lease the space several years ago, according to developer KDS Commercial Properties.

Skelton aims to build out 90 to 105 three-level townhomes in Piedmont Village, as well as 25,000-square-feet of commercial space set to house the Saluda Falls Brewery. An eight-foot pedestrian bridge will be reconstructed on the Anderson County side of the Saluda River, which will be dotted with kayak put-ins and accompanied by a trail network once the community is complete.

“We’ve got a builder — we’re probably 90 to 120 days before we start moving dirt down there,” he said, adding that he couldn’t share his contractor yet. “We’ve got all of our due diligence down, we bought the property, we own it.”

The CEO and owner of Red Oak Development is less sure today that the community’s reliance on the Piedmont Hydro Electric Project for power will come through — “there’s still an outside chance that could happen,” he said — but the village will still center around green building practices and designers will pursue LEED certification.

Semi-underground waste and recycling containers distributed by Greenville-based Sutera will be installed across the property, limiting leakage and pollution into the river.

“You don’t have to build an enclosure, you don’t have to have a dumpster, you don’t have all that juice coming out,” Skelton said. “Everything stays in the container: it’s a much more environmentally sound unit.”

Coldwell Banker Caine signed on in 2019 as the community’s real estate partner.

Former mill village Piedmont becoming a center of affordable new home activity

It’s not an incorporated town, but a census-designated area along the Saluda River best known for once being home to one of the largest textile mills in the world. The mill that birthed the place known as Piedmont burned down in the 1980s, and today only a lone smokestack remains. But it’s being discovered once again, because it’s home to one of the scarcest assets in metro Greenville—affordable housing.Once a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Greenville and Anderson counties meet, Piedmont is becoming more and...

It’s not an incorporated town, but a census-designated area along the Saluda River best known for once being home to one of the largest textile mills in the world. The mill that birthed the place known as Piedmont burned down in the 1980s, and today only a lone smokestack remains. But it’s being discovered once again, because it’s home to one of the scarcest assets in metro Greenville—affordable housing.

Once a quiet, out-of-the-way place where Greenville and Anderson counties meet, Piedmont is becoming more and more a destination for both prospective homebuyers and real estate agents searching for lower-priced homes in a market where such things have become very difficult to find. Half a dozen new home communities have sprung up around Piedmont, which features an official population of just 5,400, but average home prices which can be $50,000 less than those in the city of Greenville itself.

“Piedmont has seen tremendous growth in recent years from a residential perspective, and a new construction perspective at that, because builders are able to offer more affordable options than they would in nearby areas such as Mauldin and Simpsonville,” said Norell Mitchell Grissett, a Coldwell Banker Caine agent who’s active in the area. “Historically, land prices have been cheaper in Piedmont. And so in turn, the builders have the opportunity to offer lower prices on the homes that they would build in comparison to some more saturated areas of the Upstate.”

According to the Western Upstate Association of Realtors, the median sales price in Piedmont in January was $291,450, a 48.8 percent jump from the $195,900 of the same month in 2020. But that remains a bargain compared to January average prices of $335,000 in Fountain Inn, $353,750 in Mauldin, $360,000 in the city of Greenville north of downtown, and $650,000 in central Greenville, according to the Greater Greenville Association of Realtors.

A surge of new-home communities

And although inventory shortages exist everywhere within the greater Greenville area, Piedmont’s available supply of less expensive, developable land means more new home communities with less sticker shock. Grissett, who works for Coldwell Banker Caine’s new home division, represents Great Southern Homes, an Irmo-based company that’s building Harvest Glen, a new community that will be comprised of around 200 homes with prices starting in the low $200,000s.

Harvest Glen is approaching 100 sales in just under a year since opening, so the demand is clearly there. And Great Southern Homes is hardly the only new home builder operating in Piedmont—Cambridge Walk and Bracken Woods by D.R. Horton are offering floor plans starting in the high $200,000s, Barrington Creek by Ryan Homes is offering homes from the mid-$200,00s, and Attenborough by Eastwood Homes is offering townhomes from the mid-$200,000s.

“I think the amount of new construction offerings in Piedmont has just increased within the last few years,” Grissett said. “And I think based off the market statistics that I’ve been seeing, that trend is only going to continue. I think there’s going to be an additional surge of new communities, builders and consumers that are drawn to this area. The need for affordable housing is not going anywhere. And Piedmont will continue to offer our market a solution to that problem for some time.”

Some Greenville real estate agents will readily admit that they had never even been to Piedmont before the pandemic-fueled buying frenzy that started in mid-2020 and continues today. The area’s claim to fame was once Piedmont Manufacturing Company, a textile mill that opened in 1874 and by the turn of the century was the largest in South Carolina. But by 1977, its textile-producing days were over, according to the National Park Service, and a 1983 fire burned down a facility that had been designated a National Historic Landmark.

Since then, Piedmont has existed mainly at the fringes of Greenville’s industrial and manufacturing rebirth. Even now, “you do feel like you’re tucked away,” Grissett said. “It has a little more rural, country feel to it. It’s a little quieter, a little more laid back. But it is so close to downtown Greenville. You have shopping off West Georgia and Fairview roads. And you have easy access to that corridor of shopping on Butler Road in Mauldin. So while you have the feeling of being pulled away a little bit, you do have access to things that are convenient.”

Retail and redevelopment hopes

And almost certainly, Piedmont’s surge of new home construction will bring more nearby conveniences along with it; “retail follows rooftops,” after all, is a real estate adage that’s stood the test of time. Michelin and Lockheed Martin are among the major employers nearby, and the area now has two grocery stores anchoring shopping plazas. And “there’s absolutely going to be a need” for more commercial retail developments, Grissett added, as more new homeowners move into the area. A local developer, Larry Webb, even aims to redevelop Piedmont’s former mill village itself. State money has been earmarked to build a new pedestrian bridge over the Saluda River, and a taproom and coffee shop are planned for an old mercantile building. The ultimate goal is a picturesque riverfront downtown, just like Greenville’s.

Meanwhile, the new home building boom in Piedmont shows no signs of letting up. As of last week, Grissett had only two available homes remaining in Harvest Glen’s current phase, with a an additional phase set to come online soon. If current building trends hold—always an uncertain proposition given the supply chain issues that have hamstrung builders throughout the Upstate—the Piedmont area could soon have hundreds more new homes and thousands more new residents than it did only a few years ago.

“It would not surprise me to see 1,000 new homes within a few years’ time here, because you do have some communities that are a little bit larger than Harvest Glen, so I think you have to account for them,” Grissett said. “Some of them have closed out just fairly recently, where they went into Piedmont a few years prior to Great Southern Homes entering that market. But because those communities did so well, they now have other areas that they’re selling out of. So I would not be surprised to see those numbers increase.”

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