Termite Lawyer in Sullivan's Island, SC

Ask Us Anything

When you choose CDH for a termite damage attorney in Sullivan's Island, SC, you can rest easy knowing you're in confident, capable hands. Clients trust our law firm for termite damage cases because we have:

  • A Demonstrated Playbook of Strategies
  • A Proven Track Record of Successful Termite Cases
  • Substantial Termite Evidence Lockers with Experts and Depositions
  • Experience Handling Cases Across the Southeast United States
  • Manuals for Many Major Termite Control Companies

Unlike some termite damage law firms, our lawyers study the practices and policies of large termite control and home inspection companies. We use creative strategies to avoid unfair arbitration clauses and have devoted real resources to solving our client's claims.

Simply put, you can trust our termite damage attorneys with your case because we genuinely care about you as our client.

Whether you're a homeowner, commercial property owner, or a homeowner's association, know that you're not alone. If termites are causing damage to your property, don't let giant pest control chains or home inspection franchises take advantage of you. The cost of repairs should fall where it should - on the shoulders of the home inspection company, pest control company, or their insurers.

What Are the Signs of Termite Damage?

It's not always easy to spot the signs of termite damage, especially if you're an average person without much knowledge of the termite species. Plus, termites often wreak havoc in unseen areas like drywall, siding, and the framing of your house, so seeing damage isn't always easy. Despite those challenges, there are some common signs and areas for you to consider.

Some common signs of termite damage include:

  • Termite Swarms in Your Home
  • Discarded Termite Wings in Crawlspaces, Attics, or Other Areas
  • Small Holes or Pin Pricks in Walls
  • Mud Tunnels Running Along the Outer Walls of Your House
  • Dirt Falling Out of Cracks, Power Outlets, or Holes in Walls
  • Warped Doors and Windows

Some of the most common areas where termites do damage include:

  • In and Around Chimneys
  • Around the Bases of Outside Walls
  • In the Floors or Walls of Your Attic
  • In Your Crawlspace
  • Laundry, Bath, and Utility Rooms
  • The Floors and Sinks of Your Kitchen or Bathroom
  • Hollowed Out Wooden Areas Around Your Home

What Should I Do if I Find Termite Damage?

If you find termite damage in your home, it's best not to try and fix it yourself. Why? First, repairing damage from termites is a complicated, painstaking endeavor that requires a skilled, tedious approach. Spotting termite damage and knowing how to fix it requires a deep knowledge of how termites behave and live to get rid of them. Second, and perhaps most importantly, taking a DIY approach to termite damage may ruin your termite lawsuit.

That's true even if you have the skills and experience to do so. You might inadvertently destroy important evidence that is key to your case, which may ruin your chances of compensation for damages and poor work. Instead of trying to repair damage on your own, get a second opinion from a trusted inspector. Once your concerns are verified, it's time to call CDH Law Firm. Our experienced termite damage attorneys will dig into your case and discover if you're one of the thousands of people with grounds for filing a termite lawsuit.

Who Is at Fault for Termite Damage?

We get this question often at CDH Law Firm, though the answer is sometimes unclear. What we do know is that if you're looking for the max amount of compensation, we'll need to discover who was at fault. In some cases, it's easy to determine fault. For example, if you're a new homeowner, and a termite inspector or seller didn't inform you of an infestation, you may have grounds to sue.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Sullivan's Island, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

10 Common Excuses for Avoiding Termite Damage Liability

If you have trusted your home with a pest control company and encounter a termite issue, you might not get the help you expect, even if your claim is legitimate. With years of experience fighting big pest control companies and their insurers, we've heard just about every excuse in the book. If you're dealing with a termite problem, be wary if you hear any of the following excuses.

  • 01.The contract you signed releases our company of any liability.
  • 02.We can't help unless you sign a brand-new contract.
  • 03.There's moisture around the damaged areas of your home. We aren't responsible.
  • 04.We're under no obligation to discover hidden termite damage.
  • 05.We won't review your bond unless your property is re-treated.
  • 06.We don't have to pay because you have a re-treat-only contract.
  • 07.You need to pay for re-treatment because our chemicals or pesticides have worn off.
  • 08.You dug up our chemical barrier. Your infestation is not our fault.
  • 09.Our insurance company won't pay you. If you have a complaint, take it up with them.
  • 10.We'll cover the cost of fixing damage, but we won't open walls to see if more damage is present.

However, things get more complex if you rent a home or bought a residence many years ago and have been using a pest control company for termite infestation. You could have grounds for a case against the pest control company, your landlord, or a different third party, depending on the circumstances of your case. That's why working with a termite attorney in Sullivan's Island, SC is so important - so they can investigate the details and damages associated with your infestation and determine who is accountable.

Negligence

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Negligence?

If your home inspector did not uphold their duties and obligations to you as the home buyer, you could most certainly sue a home inspector.

Unless your termite infestation was new when your home was inspected, it would be hard for a home inspector to miss it. If you just bought a house and you have discovered damage or signs of a termite infestation, contact CHSA Law today. Our team of termite damage attorneys may be able to prove that your inspector failed at spotting and reporting termite issues in your new home.

However, proving negligence is easier said than done without a lawyer by your side. Termite inspectors aren't always expected to find every bit of termite damage, and they're often not the final say in whether your home is damage-free. That's why, with CDH Law Firm as your advocate, we'll ask the hard-hitting questions needed to discover if your inspector missed termite damage for legitimate reasons or if they were careless and negligent. We'll help facilitate a second inspection if needed and will work tirelessly to earn you the compensation you deserve.

Breach

Can I Sue a Home Inspector for Breach of Contract?

You should know that even if your home inspector is legally negligent for missing termite damage or infestations, their liability will often be limited due to the language in their contract.

If your lawsuit doesn't have the proper foundation to prove negligence, your termite damage lawyer in Sullivan's Island, SC may be able to win compensation via breach of contract. In many circumstances, this is the best route to take if it's easier to prove that an inspector violated a contract. For example, suppose the home inspection contract you signed called for a whole-home inspection, and the inspector failed to survey your crawlspace or attic. In that case, you may have a viable claim in court.

At CDH Law Firm, we understand that every termite damage case situation is different. As such, we approach every case with a nuanced, multi-faceted strategy crafted with your best interests in mind.

Cobb, Dill, & Hammett Is Here When You Need Us Most

When a termite prevention company or home inspector is negligent and causes damage to your home, it's time to act fast. You need a trustworthy termite attorney in cityname, state by your side to take the proper steps toward getting compensation.

When you depend on CHSA Law, LLC, you'll receive personalized attention and proactive representation. That's because we make an intentional decision to limit our law firm's overall caseload. This allows us to better focus on our individual clients, many of whom remain with us for generations. We do not pass off cases to paralegals or junior associates but rather prioritize the attorney-client relationship.

We value compassion and integrity, and our practice reflects those values. If you're ready to take a stand, call our office today. Our termite damage lawyers will help create a better future for you, your family, or your business.

Don't hesitate to ask

Law is complicated matter. It can cause you a big problem if you ignore it. Let us help you!

 Law Firm Sullivan's Island, SC

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Charleston businesses cleaning up after winds, flooding cause damage

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - From West Ashley to Sullivan’s Island, businesses spent the day recuperating after heavy rains and strong winds caused them to temporarily lock their doors.Many of the exterior windows at Hay Tire Pros, off Savannah Highway, shattered, and a large part of their ceiling collapsed on the inside.Vice President Bill Sekula said that they have always expected severe storms to come through with being in Charleston, but that they have never had this much damage before.“I guess it was like a...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - From West Ashley to Sullivan’s Island, businesses spent the day recuperating after heavy rains and strong winds caused them to temporarily lock their doors.

Many of the exterior windows at Hay Tire Pros, off Savannah Highway, shattered, and a large part of their ceiling collapsed on the inside.

Vice President Bill Sekula said that they have always expected severe storms to come through with being in Charleston, but that they have never had this much damage before.

“I guess it was like a microburst or something to that effect, but apparently it was raining harder than usual and then the windows started to buckle and snapped over. These windows on the side just kind of came apart and came out of the building,” Sekula said.

Sekula said glass from the windows was even in the back part of their building which is almost 30 yards away. They had to close the business for the day and return all of their customers’ vehicles. He said the incident happened during hours of operation as employees notified him at around 8 a.m.

The next-door business, Etto Leisure Cars, a golf cart dealer, also saw significant damage. Will Harton, chief executive officer, said that part of their awning was ripped off and hit their power box causing them to lose power.

“I said ‘Oh my goodness.’ You know, you live in Charleston long enough, you know a storm is going to happen. Usually, it’s a hurricane. It’s not a microburst like this, but we will be fine and we will move on from here,” Harton said.

He added that he’s glad that all of his employees are safe and that the building and golf carts can be fixed.

First Alert Chief Meteorologist Bill Walsh said the damage could have been from a potential microburst or straight-line wind, but the National Weather Service has not yet confirmed that.

The Co-Op Frosé and Eatery on Sullivan’s Island had around two feet of water inside their restaurant. Their staff members spent the day using buckets to help get rid of the water. They said they have had flooding in the past, but never anything over a foot, so this is the worst they’ve seen.

“This morning, we lifted everything off the floor because we were expecting rain and heavy floods, but we didn’t know it was going to get this bad. So, as we were lifting things off the floor, it started coming in through the back door. Next thing you know there is water all over the place and we started getting buckets and mops and throwing water out. We’ve been throwing water out for the past three and a half hours,” employee Havannah Malan said.

She said that they have had to get their floors redone three times, and she expects the business will have to get them redone a fourth time after Saturday’s flood.

The businesses said they hope to repair the damages quickly, so they can return to normal operation as soon as possible.

Copyright 2024 WCSC. All rights reserved.

For St. Patrick's Day, explore the story of early Lowcountry settler Florence O'Sullivan

While Irish culture might be celebrated this weekend in the form of green beer, Celtic music and a raucous good time, there are certainly many other ways the Emerald Isle has made its mark on Charleston.In fact, it goes all the way back to one of the first settlers of South Carolina, for whom a nearby beloved island and popular beach town is named.Florence O'Sullivan, who was an Irishman of the 1600s working for the British crown, is a notable fellow for quite a few reasons, at least from what we know of him via few surviving d...

While Irish culture might be celebrated this weekend in the form of green beer, Celtic music and a raucous good time, there are certainly many other ways the Emerald Isle has made its mark on Charleston.

In fact, it goes all the way back to one of the first settlers of South Carolina, for whom a nearby beloved island and popular beach town is named.

Florence O'Sullivan, who was an Irishman of the 1600s working for the British crown, is a notable fellow for quite a few reasons, at least from what we know of him via few surviving documents and an 1897 text called The Shaftesbury Papers that looks back on the founding of South Carolina as a proprietary colony.

Sullivan's Island is named after him, assumingly because he manned a cannon in the area where Fort Moultrie now sits that was directed at any approaching enemy ships during the earliest days of the colony. He was one of the first nonindigenous people to survey and settle in the Lowcountry, docking at Charles Towne Landing in 1670. But he actually never owned land on Sullivan's Island.

Local Charleston County Public Library historian and the voice behind the Charleston Time Machine podcast, Dr. Nic Butler, has done some extensive research on O'Sullivan, prompted by his own Irish heritage and a fascination for learning about South Carolina's past.

Sullivan's Islanders, also hungry for knowledge of their home's origins, have turned to Butler to shine a light on this enigmatic figure of local (and beyond) historical significance.

An Irishman under the British crown?

The colonization of a land already inhabited by Native Americans, who were then decimated by Europeans through war and disease, is part of Charleston's (and the United States') complicated history. But by looking at this past, Butler and other historians can better paint a true picture of how our state, and nation, came to be and how it has informed our modern-day society and culture.

When O'Sullivan comes into play, there are some interesting politics involved that speak to one particular point of tension: the Irish and British. The fact he was an Irishman working for the British crown is a fascinating and rare occasion of the times, Butler told The Post and Courier.

It is perhaps because of his status as an Irishman that he is portrayed so negatively by his peers in the documentation we do have.

"He was depicted as this weird guy… a very one-dimensional bad character," said Butler. "He was appointed surveyor general, deemed completely incompetent, and historians write him off, that he was an idiot, and an Irish idiot on top of that."

"Some of that may be true, but many South Carolina historians are looking at South Carolina from a very English perspective, and that makes sense because this was an English colony. But most Americans are not aware of the really intricate, subtle and meaningful distinctions between Ireland and England at that moment."

Ireland was a part of the British Isles and treated repressively by England. Not only were there religious differences (English Protestants very openly despised and subdued Irish Catholics — and that goes way back to the English Reformation in the 1500s), but there was a general mistrust due to English slave traders capturing Irish people and shipping them away to work in the British Empire being established at the time alongside enslaved Africans.

Indentured servants also worked for the British, receiving passage to these new lands and some payment in return; O'Sullivan helped the British recruit some such servants when he contracted with the Lord's Proprietors of Carolina to establish where we now live.

Getting into and out of a mess

Butler suggested that O'Sullivan was possibly born between 1630 and 1640 in Barbados or born in County Cork in Ireland and quickly moved to Barbados, perhaps ousted during the Irish Confederate Wars of 1640 and British Reconquest of Ireland, 1649-53.

He likely had poor Irish parents and spoke the native Gaeilge language, Butler said, and plausibly had no choice other than to use the British crown to advance his own life with the possibility of property and prosperity, despite its maltreatment of the Irish people.

"He was probably too poor to cling to the luxuries of principles," said Butler. "O’Sullivan likely held his tongue, took the king’s shilling to fight under the English flag and pushed against adversity to escape a bad situation."

The first records of him are in 1666 in Barbados, when he was a captain of an infantry unit seeking to recapture the English portion of St. Kitts from the French. He was shipwrecked during a hurricane and had to battle with French soldiers in the jungle for survival; he was then captured and spent nearly an entire year as a prisoner of war.

Somehow he paid a ransom for his release and was transported to England; in 1668, he was unemployed, penniless and in danger of being imprisoned for debt in London.

He submitted a petition to King Charles II asking for financial assistance, citing his imprisonment as a sacrifice for the crown; it was granted, along with a small catch that he must return to Barbados.

Then the Lord's Proprietors of Carolina appeared as a beacon of hope, recruiting for a new settlement in the wilderness of what would be known as Carolina. In the position of surveyor general, O'Sullivan would receive free passage and promise of land ownership in the new territory.

Charleston Scene

Settling Carolina

This is where the bad talk about O'Sullivan enters from his peers, as he begins surveying in the new settlement.

“O’Sullivan doth act very strangely and was a very dissentious troublesome young man in all particulars," one source shared.

Another complained that O’Sullivan “doth by his absurd language abuse the governor, counsel and country and by his rash and based dealings he hath caused everyone in the country almost to be his enemy.”

This "absurd language" might have been him speaking in the native Irish tongue, countered Butler. And perhaps he didn't get along with anyone because he wanted to scout out his land and then be left alone, finally escaping the British dominion that had almost entirely consumed his life and career.

Columbia

A few years later, O'Sullivan was replaced as survey general and commissioned as a captain in the nascent militia, where he likely made raids against neighboring Native tribes.

It was 1680 before he officially was granted parcels of land totaling 2,460 acres. The largest tract stretched from the northwest of Shem Creek to the southeast of McCants Drive and Rifle Range Road to Haddrell's Point northward to the vicinity of Venning Road. Another spanned Charleston Harbor to Home Farm Road in Mount Pleasant. And the smallest covered some of the Old Village.

Surprisingly, unlike his peers of the time, O'Sullivan sold most of this land to neighbors while others were expanding their territories.

“Florence O’Sullivan’s downsizing in the 1680s provides yet another example of his divergence from the contemporary norms," said Butler. "Perhaps he scorned the use of enslaved labor and cultivated far less acreage than his more affluent neighbors.”

While there is no record of a wife, O'Sullivan did have a daughter, Catherine, and withdrew to a more private life East of the Cooper, while likely manning a cannon as lookout on Sullivan's Island.

Irish resiliency

"While he might’ve just been a cantankerous, belligerent man, we can at least entertain the possibility that he was something far more interesting and sympathetic: a refugee from a broken country, a poor migrant searching for a home," said Butler. "Rather than seeking riches and possessions in the Carolina colony, perhaps he simply wanted to be left alone, free to express his own beliefs and opinions in the language of his ancestors."

This idea of Irish resiliency is one that Butler paints through O'Sullivan in an episode of his podcast on the subject.

Perhaps by considering O’Sullivan as a stoic Irishman struggling within an Anglo-centric framework, we might lift the veil shrouding his enigmatic story, he offered.

Joseph P. Kelly, director of Irish and Irish American Studies at the College of Charleston, notes that while O'Sullivan's story is a lesser-known one, there have been many Irish people since in the Lowcountry who have made a significant impact on society.

Take Simon Felix Gallagher, the first Irish Catholic professor at the College of Charleston, and one of the first we might associate with our modern definition of who the Irish are, said Kelly, like those behind the St. Patrick's Day parade.

The list goes on, but two organizations in particular stand out.

Today, we can look to the Hibernian Society as a melding of the Catholic and Protestant Irish. At its beginnings in 1801, it was truly a symbol for freedom of religion, a promise that had been made in the New World but not truly upheld.

Opinion

That, of course, changed with the separation of church and state in 1776, and the Hibernian Society sought to bring together Irish culture in its diverse forms that had since developed from the early days of the Carolinas.

The Ancient Order of the Hibernians, an entirely Catholic organization that had a presence in Charleston in the 1860s, sought to rebel against years of prejudice against Irish Catholics, fighting stereotyping and discrimination.

Both are still going strong today in Charleston, as local Irish culture lives on in its many forms. Perhaps we have O'Sullivan to thank for a small piece of that, a figure who defied norms, ruffled some feathers along the way and had a whole island named after him that he didn't even own.

There's something to think about next time you're walking the beach at Sullivan's Island. You might end up at Dunleavy's Pub for a Guinness and Reuben after.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last minute tickets and little-known experiences hand-selected by our newsroom in your inbox each Thursday.

Historic Sullivan's Island Residence Sells For $9 Million

Jimmy Dye, founding partner and broker-in-charge of The Cassina Group, successfully represented the owners on the sale of 1702 Ion Avenue, a significant transaction for Sullivan's Island. The property, a stunning 5-bedroom, 3.5-bath, 7,344 square foot home, was sold for $9,000,000, marking a notable milestone for the island's real estate market., successfully represented the owners on the sale of 1702 Ion Avenue, a significant transaction for Sullivan's Island. The property, a stunning 5-bedroom, 3.5-bath, 7,344 square foot home, was ...

Jimmy Dye, founding partner and broker-in-charge of The Cassina Group, successfully represented the owners on the sale of 1702 Ion Avenue, a significant transaction for Sullivan's Island. The property, a stunning 5-bedroom, 3.5-bath, 7,344 square foot home, was sold for $9,000,000, marking a notable milestone for the island's real estate market.

, successfully represented the owners on the sale of 1702 Ion Avenue, a significant transaction for Sullivan's Island. The property, a stunning 5-bedroom, 3.5-bath, 7,344 square foot home, was sold for $9,000,000, marking a notable milestone for the island's real estate market.

Originally constructed as the Base Commandant's Quarters, this exquisitely preserved historic home holds a unique place in history as the largest and most elaborate surviving structure of offices at Fort Moultrie. Its significance was further accentuated during World War II when it became the residence of the chief of staff, George C. Marshall.

"I am thrilled to have had the opportunity to represent the sellers on this extraordinary property," said Jimmy Dye. "Its rich history and timeless elegance make it a truly one-of-a-kind home, and I am proud to have been involved in the sale."

The property's distinctive features include expansive wraparound porches, tin printed ceilings, multiple fireplaces, gracious rooms, 9-foot ceilings throughout, a renovated kitchen, and a private pool, among others. Its charm and historical significance were a draw for buyers, leading to the property going under contract a mere 7 days after being listed with Dye.

This sale not only underscores the enduring appeal of Sullivan's Island but also highlights Jimmy Dye's exceptional ability to navigate high-value transactions in the luxury real estate market. The Cassina Group has a dominant presence on Sullivan's Island, closing 2023 as the #1 firm for sales on the island.

For more information on The Cassina Group, please visit TheCassinaGroup.com.

About The Cassina Group

The Cassina Group is a boutique real estate brokerage with offices in Mount Pleasant, SC and Charleston, SC. The firm is managed by founding partners and brokers-in-charge, Jimmy Dye and Robertson Allen, and Owen Tyler, partner and managing broker. Recent awards include top honors from Charleston Magazine, Inc. 5000, T3 Sixty and SC Biz News. For more information, visit TheCassinaGroup.com or call 843-628-0008.

Media Contact

Simon Ashton, SIMS Agency, 1 8433219292, simon@simsagency.com

SOURCE The Cassina Group

Visitors and residents recall coyote encounters, attacks on Sullivan’s Island

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Several Sullivan’s Island dog walkers and regulars are speaking up about their personal experiences with coyotes.This comes a day after town officials reported five coyote-led attacks involving dogs within the month of August.They say the wild animals has been approaching people, dogs and roaming open areas of the beach more often than usual.The Jourdan family says they experienced a too-close encounter with a coyote over the weekend.“They were out halfway to the ...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Several Sullivan’s Island dog walkers and regulars are speaking up about their personal experiences with coyotes.

This comes a day after town officials reported five coyote-led attacks involving dogs within the month of August.

They say the wild animals has been approaching people, dogs and roaming open areas of the beach more often than usual.

The Jourdan family says they experienced a too-close encounter with a coyote over the weekend.

“They were out halfway to the water, from the dune, so middle of the beach. And they were attacked by coyotes,” Jourdan said.

Five-year-old Willie Nelson, the Jourdan family dog, was taken by two coyotes early Saturday morning while on a walk with a babysitter.

Jourdan says it happened in broad daylight and in the middle of the beach.

He adds the family was devastated by the loss of their “wonder dog.”

“I was trying to get closure for my family’s sake, for Willie, because we weren’t even there. Which was frustrating. I crawled on my belly for over four miles between stations 26 and 28,” Jourdan said.

The attack occurred at Station 27, a part of the beach several residents have called a “breeding ground” for coyote packs.

Officials with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources say the breed has been approaching people, dogs and roaming open areas of the beach more often.

They add that mid-summer and fall are peak active times for these animals, meaning it is when coyotes migrate to new spaces, feed and have young.

SCDNR officials say another reason for the increased interactions could be from them being opportunistic feeders, meaning they will be quick and take anything they need.

Others say they have been chased by coyotes in the past but escaped.

“We were walking in June when a coyote came out of the dunes and started chasing,” Sullivan’s regular Shelly Carson said. “I was able to chase it away, and it ran down the beach to chase a golden retriever.”

Now, they avoid the area altogether or take proactive measures to be able to walk safely.

“I’ve always known there are coyotes here,” Carson said. “Never seen one until this year. Really, March was the first time I had my first sighting and started carrying pepper spray on the beach. In June I started carrying a birdie alarm. And now I carry a stick with me too.”

Visitors are asking for help from officials to curb the problem.

“It’s close to our hearts, but the coyote system is unfortunately not something that is new, declining or lessened. Rather the opposite,” Jourdan said.

They ask for coyote population control, area management and listening to residential concerns.

Town officials say they do have systems in place to manage the problem, which include education, tracking, hazing and lethal control.

They ask anyone who experiences an encounter or sighting to report the problem immediately.

If you run into a coyote, you’re advised to react loudly, throw small sticks or cans or spray the animal with water.

For more information on coyotes along Sullivan’s Island, click here.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston Water System responds to Sullivan’s Island Council decision amid contract dispute

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The future of water service on Sullivan’s Island remains uncertain amid a contractual dispute between the town and Charleston Water System.“The island has the ability to generate taxes and they need to figure it out because what they did in 2017 was, they just quit paying,” said Sullivan’s Island resident, Dave Spurgin.A 30-year water supply contract between CWS and the Town of Sullivan’s Island went into effect on July 19, 1994.Based on letters p...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – The future of water service on Sullivan’s Island remains uncertain amid a contractual dispute between the town and Charleston Water System.

“The island has the ability to generate taxes and they need to figure it out because what they did in 2017 was, they just quit paying,” said Sullivan’s Island resident, Dave Spurgin.

A 30-year water supply contract between CWS and the Town of Sullivan’s Island went into effect on July 19, 1994.

Based on letters provided by CWS, there has been a disagreement over the rates since 2017. The water system claims the town owes them $1,078,000 as of last month.

“Years ago, Charleston Water System decided to raise our rates as if our signed contract did not exist. The town disputed that rate increase and has continued to pay the undisputed amount owed in accordance with our longstanding signed agreement,” said Sullivan’s Island Town Councilman Justin Novak on Monday night during a special council meeting.

The statement was part of a longer motion read aloud before council voted to pay $227,361 to satisfy the disputed portion of the amount owed. Island leaders said the amount was calculated by a nationally recognized rate consultant.

CWS CEO Mark Cline released the following statement to News 2 on Tuesday.

“Charleston Water System does not agree with the Town of Sullivan’s Island’s viewpoint or its recollection of the historical facts. We fully intend to discontinue the Town’s water service July 20 unless their past due amount is fully paid and they have entered into a new contract that appropriately covers the costs of providing water service to their community. It’s not fair that our other customers have been subsidizing the Town’s service for years now, and that would continue under their terms.”

Spurgin, who has lived on Sullivan’s Island for nearly 30 years, said he is not concerned about the potential water shut-off.

“No, because we’re going to need our water. They’re not going to shut the water off. The town’s going to have to figure out, the town council is going to have to figure out how to come up with the money,” Spurgin told News 2.

The town has not responded for comment on Tuesday.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.